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Camouflage

NEWS
November 23, 1990 | By Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
America's Persian Gulf troops saw their commander-in-chief at the front yesterday. But here's what they really wanted to see: beer, mail, spouses, pillows, fly swatters and a commitment to fight or pull out. Now! President Bush came to Saudi Arabia to give the troops a boost, to eat ham and shrimp creole and sweet potatoes for Thanksgiving with U.S. forces and to try to boost support at home for this desert mission. The President also warned that Iraq's progress in developing nuclear weapons gave the troops' mission a sense of urgency and that they may soon face combat - "some pain now to avoid even worse pain later.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
CAMOUFLAGE IS going from the battlefield to the streets. The military pattern is trending with stylish men and women who rock it alongside traditional jackets and pants for a fresh look.   Contact Reuben Harley at BIGRUBE@streetgazing.com , or follow on Twitter @BigRubeHarley. Read his blog at streetgazing.com.
NEWS
May 26, 2005 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Military camouflage, created during World War I to hide soldiers from spotter planes, has been co-opted by war protesters, adopted by fashion designers, and embraced by snowboarders. Now, with the war in Iraq, it has invaded the nursery. Infants are drooling on camo bibs, sleeping on camo sheets, and wearing diaper covers in the green, brown and black Woodland pattern that, when viewed through night-vision goggles, makes soldiers look like trees. Phil Galloway, owner of Hangar 18 Surplus in Bulverde, Texas, believes popular culture rediscovers camo every time the military tweaks it. How fast does camo travel from battlefield to boutique?
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is about 5 p.m. Tuesday, the beginning of an amazing night for two detectives from the Camden County Sheriff's Department. The two are headed for South Camden to arrest a man wanted in the stabbing of his girlfriend. But there will be a detour. In fact, there will be six detours. At Sixth Street and Ferry Avenue, Detective Duane Cherry and Sgt. Michael Barone spot a different suspect, Kassime Johnson. Johnson, 20, of the 1600 block of Louis Street, failed to show for a burglary trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Jack (Paul Meshejian) and Jill (Kathryn Petersen) meet, date, get married, divorce, meet again, consider doing the whole thing over. Along the way, they argue, squabble, wrangle, dispute, debate, contend. She needs to find herself; he needs to develop a spine. I need to go home. This is Jane Martin's Jack and Jill, being given its area premiere at the People's Light & Theatre Company in a fine production directed by Ken Marini. Performed on a Plexiglas platform, the two-character play unfolds in a series of brief scenes; their fluid segues are effected with the help of four silent, black-garbed "dressers" who assist the actors with costumes and props.
NEWS
July 26, 1988 | BY JERRY CARRIER
Fans of spy fiction are familiar with the "L-Pill. " That's a cyanide- filled glass capsule implanted in a secret agent's tooth. If he's caught, the agent - to avoid torture and giving away his fellow agents - bites his L- Pill and dies in seconds. To a politician of the 1980s, the equivalent of the L-Pill is the L-Word. To be called a liberal is instant death. Which is why last week's Democratic National Coronation in Atlanta was - as much as anything else - an exercise in camouflage.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY and ANN GERHART, Daily News Staff Writers
After yesterday's dedication at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, a man of about 40 who was dressed in battle fatigues and carrying a bottle of beer approached the section bearing the names of war dead beginning with the letter "T". He took a big swig from the bottle, wet the fingers of his right hand with the beer, and traced them over one of the names. Then he wept. About a minute later, as he began walking away, he noticed some people staring at him, and said: "This guy I knew was a good friend.
NEWS
April 7, 1999 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Hoping to avoid what might be a costly court judgment, the Borough Council agreed last night to an out-of-court settlement that will allow a long-disputed cellular tower to be built in historic downtown. Under terms of the deal, the borough will allow Omnipoint Communications Inc. to raise a 100-foot monopole in the northwest corner of Yardleyville Square parking lot. In return, the company will withdraw two federal lawsuits it has filed against the borough for rejecting its proposal last year.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1991 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Where do you get gas masks? What kind of shortwave radio do you need to bring in broadcasts from the Middle East? As Philadelphians turn their attention to the events in the Persian Gulf, shoppers are looking for those items and are even snapping up military fatigue outfits, retailers say. For other people, the safety of their savings is paramount, according to local bankers. They say that even before bombs hit Baghdad, they saw a move into insured investments by many customers.
SPORTS
October 12, 1988 | By Mike Bruton, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the aftermath of the Eagles' 23-21 loss to the Minnesota Vikings on Sept. 25, linebacker Seth Joyner philosophized that the Philadelphia defense would learn from its mistakes. But, based on the evidence of Monday night, that defense still has some growing up to do. The same kinds of mental lapses, mistakes and inconsistency that led to fourth-quarter collapses against the Vikings and, two weeks earlier, the Cincinnati Bengals occurred against the New York Giants. But this time, more by chance than by accomplishment, the Eagles' defense didn't relinquish a game-winning touchdown.
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