CollectionsCamp William Penn
IN THE NEWS

Camp William Penn

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | By Kate Campbell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Refurbished pillars and a gate hemming a private home in this section of Cheltenham are the only standing reminders of Camp William Penn, where the first black Union soldiers were trained during the Civil War. Yet stories and worn photographs have lingered, and locals here are proud of LaMott's rich African American history and such famed residents as abolitionist Lucretia Mott and her son-in-law Edward Davis, who helped create the Emancipation Proclamation....
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A bit of the past is about to be revealed. Cheltenham Township officials announced last week that they had received a $25,000 Community Development Block Grant through Montgomery County to restore the gateway of the military camp where thousands of black soldiers trained during the Civil War. The money will enable the township to refurbish and reinstall the original iron entrance gate at 7325 Sycamore Ave., remove blacktop to reveal the...
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Sixth United States Colored Infantry, largely recruited and wholly trained in our region, fought as free men for the Union, but at enormous personal cost. In his recent book, Strike the Blow for Freedom (White Mane Books, 1999), James M. Paradis of Abington tells the story of this unit, which suffered mass casualties to illness, battle and the emotional trauma of war. The book, which adds to a growing number of histories of black Civil War regiments, offers sound scholarship with a human face.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Jill Anna Greenberg
A historical marker was unveiled Saturday at the site of Camp William Penn, the site where black Union soldiers were trained during the Civil War. The site in LaMott was the nation's largest, and the state's only, training camp for black soldiers.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Not long after African Americans had won their freedom in 1863, a black Union soldier on sentry duty at Camp William Penn shot and killed a white man. The charge in The Commonwealth v. Charles Ridley was murder. Located in what is now the village of LaMott in Cheltenham Township, Camp William Penn had itself come into existence because of the Emancipation Proclamation issued by President Lincoln, which said that as of Jan. 1, 1863, all slaves shall "forever more be free. " Widespread recruitment of African Americans into the Union Army followed, and Camp William Penn was created as a segregated training base for black soldiers.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
To some people, Camp William Penn in the Poconos is 670 rolling acres of trees and grass dotted with cabins, a quiet lake and narrow dirt roads that snake through peaceful camp grounds. To Jewell Williams, it's much more. "I grew up in an African-American neighborhood," says the 34-year-old North Philadelphia community leader. "And for the first time (at Camp William Penn) I came in contact with whites and Hispanics. " Williams was a camper 22 years ago. His contact with other races that summer grew into friendships and a lasting impression.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | By Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
There is sacred ground at the end of North Broad Street, across Cheltenham Avenue in Cheltenham Township. Here, in an area now known as La Mott, soldiers of African descent trained to fight in the Civil War at Camp William Penn, established in 1863 as the nation's first training camp for black soldiers. But the area's role in history was not limited to the war years. Before the Civil War, it was a major station on the Underground Railroad, and such eminent abolitionists as Sojourner Truth and Frederick Douglass often met there.
NEWS
July 7, 2008 | By MICHAEL SHELTON
THE FIRST week of July was typically the start of Camp William Penn. But after two decades of trying to close the city-funded summer camp in the Poconos, the politicians mustered the will to make it happen. The timing of the camp's closing is ironic. In March, the National Parks and Recreation Association concluded that one of most pressing issues affecting young people in the U.S. is the challenge of getting them outdoors to play - they're simply losing touch with the natural world.
NEWS
August 8, 2010 | By John Bryer
The nation's sesquicentennial observances of the Civil War, starting next year, will be a good time to separate myth from fact and appreciate how people from our region shaped the conflict. Contrary to one popular belief, the war was not started to end slavery. It was fought to stop the spread of slavery to new states in the West. Only in late 1862 was the larger issue broached. President Abraham Lincoln had intentions to free slaves in states not under Union control but proper timing of the Emancipation Proclamation was essential.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tillman Valentine didn't know the hard times he'd face when he enlisted in the Army that morning of June 30, 1863. He was a black man in a country at war with itself over slavery and state's rights. Emotions were running high as Confederate forces invaded Pennsylvania, where a great battle - the bloodiest of the Civil War - was about to be fought at Gettysburg. Valentine bade an affectionate goodbye to his pregnant wife, Annie, and their three children in West Chester and headed to Camp William Penn, the first and largest federal training ground for black soldiers, just north of Philadelphia.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tillman Valentine didn't know the hard times he'd face when he enlisted in the Army that morning of June 30, 1863. He was a black man in a country at war with itself over slavery and state's rights. Emotions were running high as Confederate forces invaded Pennsylvania, where a great battle - the bloodiest of the Civil War - was about to be fought at Gettysburg. Valentine bade an affectionate goodbye to his pregnant wife, Annie, and their three children in West Chester and headed to Camp William Penn, the first and largest federal training ground for black soldiers, just north of Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 2, 2013
Honor proud legacy Camp William Penn in historic La Mott, Cheltenham Township, was the first and largest federal training camp for the U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War ("African Americans' historic regiments," Sept. 19). All that remains is the original gate, but the memory was alive and well last month at the 150th anniversary commemoration, with descendants of troops and reenactors keeping history alive. The camp's museum, mothballed for years due to lack of funds, was filled with amazing artifacts for the occasion, and had a room paying homage to local heroine Lucretia Mott, abolitionist and suffragette, for whom the community is named.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixth in an occasional series on the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg on July 1 to 3. A thick, misty fog embraced the blue columns of African American soldiers "like a mantle of death" as they marched through pre-dawn darkness toward the enemy earthworks outside Richmond, Va. Spotted by Confederate pickets, members of the Sixth U.S. Colored Troops (USCT) quickly ran into a torrent of musket and artillery fire that cut through their ranks and shredded the national and regimental colors, snapping the flagpoles in two. That chaotic moment - when Sgt. Maj. Thomas R. Hawkins, First Sgt. Alexander Kelly, and Lt. Nathan Edgerton rushed in to rescue the colors - has been captured for the Union League of Philadelphia in a newly commissioned oil painting by the renowned Civil War artist Don Troiani.
NEWS
August 8, 2010 | By John Bryer
The nation's sesquicentennial observances of the Civil War, starting next year, will be a good time to separate myth from fact and appreciate how people from our region shaped the conflict. Contrary to one popular belief, the war was not started to end slavery. It was fought to stop the spread of slavery to new states in the West. Only in late 1862 was the larger issue broached. President Abraham Lincoln had intentions to free slaves in states not under Union control but proper timing of the Emancipation Proclamation was essential.
NEWS
July 7, 2008 | By MICHAEL SHELTON
THE FIRST week of July was typically the start of Camp William Penn. But after two decades of trying to close the city-funded summer camp in the Poconos, the politicians mustered the will to make it happen. The timing of the camp's closing is ironic. In March, the National Parks and Recreation Association concluded that one of most pressing issues affecting young people in the U.S. is the challenge of getting them outdoors to play - they're simply losing touch with the natural world.
NEWS
June 18, 2008
THE NEWS that Camp William Penn is closing really upset me because I know that the children of the "inner city," as the newspaper put it, will never get to experience what I did as a 9-year-old girl. I'm now 52. We grew up poor and never went places or did things that other kids took for granted. A woman on our block (who may have been a committee person) sent out fliers about the city camp. My parents couldn't afford to send me, so this woman put up the money. Her name was Nellie Plegues.
NEWS
June 2, 2008
WHEN WE WERE KIDS, we loved our summer stays at overnight camps. To this day, the smell of wet vegetation after a summer rain takes us back to those days when we slept outside in tents, hiked in the woods and swam in the lake. So the news that Camp William Penn, the city-run, taxpayer-subsidized camp for underprivileged youth has closed after 56 years is a sad commentary on several fronts. City officials say the camp in the Poconos is run down, and enrollment had declined over the years.
NEWS
March 20, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Soldiers in Union garb fired three rounds over the resting place of Perry Triplett yesterday as a drummer boy tapped slowly and solemnly. "He would have liked that," said Joseph Tappe, 82, who worked for many years with Triplett on projects that would bring recognition to LaMott, a section of Cheltenham Township where they lived and where many African American soldiers were trained during the Civil War. Yesterday, at Calvary Presbyterian Church...
NEWS
March 19, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Perry Triplett, 77, of LaMott in Cheltenham Township, who for 35 years sought recognition of his hometown's contribution to the Civil War, died of acute respiratory distress syndrome Tuesday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Triplett was founder and director of Citizens for the Restoration of Historic LaMott. The organization had collected artifacts and was raising money to renovate a building that housed the United States Colored Troops Museum in LaMott. The museum is on the site of Camp William Penn, the first and largest federal facility to train black recruits during the Civil War. In 1969, Mr. Triplett and his uncle, Frank, founded the citizens group to preserve the heritage of the community.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | By Chris Gray and Nora Koch INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In the Civil War papers of his great-grandfather William Henry Beck, Benjamin Franklin Beck sees a little of himself. Both men fought in the controversial military struggles of their time, the Civil War and Vietnam. Both men sustained disabling injuries that affected their lives after leaving the service. Now in honor of his long-deceased relative, Benjamin Beck dons the blue wool uniform and slouchy "bummer" cap of the Third Regiment Infantry of the U.S. Colored Troops and teaches others about African American involvement in the Civil War, an often-overlooked facet of history.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|