CollectionsCampbell Soup
IN THE NEWS

Campbell Soup

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 28, 1986 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Campbell Soup announced yesterday the company will spend $37 million in the next three years to modernize its Camden canned food plant to make it more competitive. James Moran, a Campbell spokesman, said the modernization is part of a $1 billion package the company plans during the next several years to upgrade its 75 domestic plants, mushroom farms and bakeries. Campbell Soup Co., which had $2.9 billion in revenue last year, has 90 plants worldwide. Moran said Campbell officials decided to upgrade the Camden plant, the company's oldest, after discussing two other options.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1991 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Campbell Soup Co. yesterday reported its fifth straight quarter of record earnings under David W. Johnson, the aggressive chief executive hired 22 months ago to pull the company out of the doldrums. Earnings for the first quarter of the company's fiscal year rose a healthy 23 percent, despite a 3 percent drop in sales. The company credited productivity gains and the sale of some unprofitable business lines for the earnings growth. Part of the sales decline resulted from the disposition of those businesses.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Sears building that has been vacant for years on Admiral Wilson Boulevard in Camden was sold Monday to Campbell Soup Co. for $3.5 million after years of litigation. The former department store will be razed to make room for a 13-acre office park, which Campbell spokesman Anthony Sanzio said would ideally house professional firms and new businesses in the financially struggling city. "It's a win for us, a win for the city, and hopefully a win" for former owner Ilan Zaken, Sanzio said.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1991 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time in four years, Campbell Soup Co. has announced a plan to buy back a substantial amount of its stock. The company's board of directors yesterday voted to repurchase as many as 3 million shares "from time to time. " The repurchase would amount to 2 percent of the company's 125.5 million outstanding shares. Leonard Griehs, director of investor relations for Campbell Soup, said the plan was a means of enhancing the company's stock value. "It's another way of rewarding shareholders," Griehs said.
NEWS
June 3, 2010
Camden activists desperate to save a former Sears building from destruction are calling for a boycott of Campbell Soup. About a dozen of them, from the group Camden United Inc., gathered Wednesday in the Sears parking lot to urge supporters to stop buying Campbell's soups and other products. Campbell, which wants to develop an office park around its headquarters, says developers are balking at working on the project as long as the 83-year-old Sears building is standing on it. The owner of the building, which has not had any businesses in it for several years, is pushing a plan to turn it into a restaurant-equipment distribution center and culinary school.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William E. Harwick of Radnor, a retired Campbell Soup Co. executive, died of heart failure Friday at his winter home in Vero Beach, Fla. Mr. Harwick retired from Campbell Soup Co. in Camden in 1983 as vice president of administrative services. He had been with the company for 32 years and previously worked for the Rohm & Haas Co. in Philadelphia. After retiring from Campbell Soup, he served for a number of years as acting administrator of the Corielle Institute in Camden, which raises funds for medical research.
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Philip Walburn Souder, 96, who worked his way up from chemist to president of research and development at Campbell Soup Co. before retiring in 1960, died Monday at his Moorestown home. Born in Lester Manor, Va., and raised in Camden, he completed three years at Camden High School before enlisting in the Army. A World War I veteran, he was assigned to Battery F of the 73d Coast Guard Regiment, which was stationed with railway guns behind the Metz front in France. After the military, Mr. Souder graduated from Millersville State Normal School in Millersville, Pa., in 1920.
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Albert A. Austin, 72, of Haverford, former vice president of Campbell Soup Co., died of an apparent heart attack Saturday at his summer home in Cotuit, Mass. Born in Ireland, Mr. Austin grew up in Milton, Mass., and served in the Navy during World War II. He was a graduate of Yale University and Harvard Business School. For more than 30 years, he was an executive at Container Corp. of America. In 1983, when he was a senior vice president, Mr. Austin left CCA and went to work at Campbell Soup, where he was vice president for containers and capital improvement from 1984 until he retired in 1989.
NEWS
December 5, 1998 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harold A. Shaub, 83, former president and chief executive officer of Campbell Soup Co., died of heart failure Sunday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. He lived in Bryn Mawr and had formerly lived in Gladwyne. In his 38 years at Campbell, Mr. Shaub rose from being a supervisor at the Camden plant to head the company. Under his leadership, Campbell's sales doubled. Mr. Shaub also oversaw the launching of Campbell's Labels for Education program. "Harold was a good man and a dear friend for more than 25 years," Joe Paterno, the football coach at Pennsylvania State University, said yesterday.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
William A. Schmidt, 64, retired vice president of engineering for Campbell Soup Co., died of pancreatic cancer Tuesday at his Moorestown home. Mr. Schmidt, an Army veteran and a graduate of Drexel University, rose through the ranks at Campbell from engineering trainee to corporate vice president. In 1981, the year he earned a master's in business administration from St. Joseph University, Mr. Schmidt was named executive vice president and then president of Pepperidge Farm Inc. Campbell's baked-goods subsidiary.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 31, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Campbell Soup Co. has shuffled top executives and said it would "proceed on a reorganization of Campbell's corporate functions to deliver agile and effective support to the business divisions, and on a major project to reexamine and redesign the company's cost structure. " In its announcement Thursday, the Camden company, whose gross profit margin has steadily eroded in recent years, provided no specifics on targets for cutting costs. The reorganization, not the first in Campbell's recent history, reduced the company's divisions to three from four.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George M. Dorrance III, 63, of Villanova, a Royal Bank of Canada wealth manager, died Tuesday, Jan. 27, of leukemia at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He had been diagnosed with the disease last March. A scion of the Campbell Soup Co. family, Mr. Dorrance was the son of G. Morris Dorrance Jr., former CoreStates chairman, who was eulogized at his death in 2011 as "a banker with a heart. " His grandfather was a prominent surgeon. Mr. Dorrance worked from an office at 6 Tower Bridge in Conshohocken as a wealth manager for RBC Dain Rauscher Corp., which provides banking services to corporate and governmental clients and investment advice and services to individual investors, according to a company profile.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Richard L. Baker was among more than 30 men who for years have attended a weekly Bible study class at the First Presbyterian Church in Moorestown. "He never missed it. He had a longing to know Scripture," the Rev. Jonathan Miller, the First Presbyterian pastor, said in a phone interview. Getting there took some effort, Miller said: The class was held each Wednesday, at 6:30 a.m. On Friday, Sept. 5, Mr. Baker, 89, who retired in 1990 as deputy general counsel for Campbell Soup Co., died of heart failure at his home in Moorestown.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Campbell Soup Co. officials told analysts Monday that the Camden food company aspires to reach $10 billion in annual revenue within the next five years. That is an aggressive target for Campbell, which has about $8 billion in annual revenue now. Achieving it is likely to require acquisitions, given that Campbell has been failing recently to match its goal of increasing revenue by percent to 4 percent a year, without the help of acquisitions. The purchase of three faster-growing companies in the last two years - Bolthouse Farms carrots and juices, cookie-maker Kelsen Group, and Plum Organics children's foods - has helped build momentum, said Anthony DiSilvestro, the company's chief financial officer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
"In the future, everyone will be famous for 15 minutes. " Andy Warhol's 15 has been the longest in the history of time, and his fame for his iconic Campbell Soup cans and multiple portraits of Marilyn lives on. The artist who defined the Pop Art movement is the subject of Andy: A Popera , the love child/brainchild of the Bearded Ladies and Opera Philadelphia. Their collaboration will culminate in a full production in March 2015, but meanwhile, this work-in-progress is presented as a cabaret in the Wilma Theater's lobby.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Because of weaker-than-expected sales in the first nine months of its fiscal year, Campbell Soup Co. reduced its outlook for full-year revenue growth Monday. The Camden company, whose brands include Chunky soups and Pepperidge Farm breads, said it now expects revenue from continuing operations to increase 3 percent, down from the previous range of 4 percent to 5 percent. Campbell's revenues for the three months ended April 27 were $1.97 billion, up slightly from $1.96 billion in the comparable period a year ago. Net income was $184 million, up 1.7 percent from $181 million the year before.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Campbell Soup Co. has weather issues on both sides of the country. In the East, there's the cold and the snow, which normally spur consumers to eat up the soup they have in their cupboards and then buy more. But that doesn't always work out. "We definitely acknowledge a benefit of cold temperatures, but we think it was offset by unfavorable weather conditions. We had plant closures for a while, retail store closures, and some lost business in the food-service sector," Denise Morrison, Campbell's president and chief executive, said Friday during a teleconference on the Camden company's second-quarter results.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony P. DiSilvestro will succeed B. Craig Owens as chief financial officer of Campbell Soup Co. in May, the Camden company said Friday. Owens, 59, who has been Campbell's CFO and chief administrative officer since 2008, plans to retire May 1. DiSilvestro, 55, has been a financial executive at Campbell since 1996, most recently as senior vice president of finance. He is also the top financial officer for Campbell North America, the company's largest division. In addition to soup, Campbell manufactures and sells Pepperidge Farm breads, cookies and crackers; V8 and Bolthouse Farm juices, and Plum Organics baby foods.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2013 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Camden-based Campbell Soup Co., said Tuesday that it eliminated 250 salaried positions as it tries to streamline operations and reverse a decline in sales. A company spokeswoman would not say how many of the jobs came from its headquarters. The company took a restructuring charge of $20 million to account for those positions. Through this and other measures, the company said, it expected annualized savings of $40 million. In reporting quarterly financial results, Campbell said its quarterly profit fell 30 percent as U.S. sales of soups and V8 beverage declined.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Who's laughing now, Hartford? Camden is. A fair portion of comedian Dave Chappelle's triumphant show at the Susquehanna Bank Center on Friday night was devoted to his infamous appearance last week in Hartford, where in the face of sustained, rowdy yelling from the audience, he walked off stage. But as he pointed out Friday in a bit about losing an argument with his wife, he's got "a creative outlet" as a performer. In other words, a guy who goes to work every night with a microphone will always get the last word.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|