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SPORTS
February 21, 1998 | by Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
Team Canada had it all covered. Months of meticulous preparation included even the smallest travel details. The roster carefully blended role players with stars. The Canadians had the leadership, the solid defensive system, the goaltending, the depth. But the gold-medal game will be played tomorrow at the Big Hat Arena between the Czech Republic and Russia, because there were two things Team Canada general manager Bob Clarke couldn't factor into his planning. Dominik Hasek and the Olympic format.
SPORTS
February 19, 2006 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talk about irony. Paul DiPietro, Canadian by birth and Italian by descent, plays for Switzerland's national hockey team because he married a Swiss woman and also plays for EV Zug in the Swiss League A. Yesterday, DiPietro scored two goals as the Swiss stunned Canada, 2-0, at Torino Esposizioni, giving the Swiss upsets of heavily favored Czech Republic and Canada in back-to-back games. "I am taking it all in right now," DiPietro said. "I'm enjoying the moment. I said I wanted to come in here and work as a team.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Just a bunch of cute Canadians in their 20s looking for love? Look again. Love and Human Remains unintentionally suggests that being single is a severe personality disorder. In this peculiar cross between Friends and a Freddy Krueger movie, we have seven characters in search of a situation - all menaced by a serial killer whose signature is ripping an earring through his prey's pierced lobe. Potential victims? The cynical waiter who used to be an actor (isn't it usually the reverse?
SPORTS
October 11, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Barely half the players in the NHL are born in Canada, the lowest total in league history. The number of U.S.-born players is 14.1 percent, a 17-year low. There were 375 Canadians (52.3 percent) on Opening-Night rosters compared to 380 (53.2 percent) a year ago. There were 241 Europeans (33.6 percent) on Opening-Night rosters compared to 227 (31.8 percent) a year ago. There are 101 American-born players this year compared to 107 (15 percent) one year ago. Twenty years ago, the NHL was 81.8 percent Canadian, 10 percent American and 8.2 percent European.
SPORTS
February 15, 2006 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Americans will have to play spoilers. The Canadians should repeat. And the Czechs could be among the strongest teams at these Winter Games. The men's ice hockey tournament opens today as the United States takes on Latvia, while Canada faces Italy. Four years ago in Salt Lake City, Canada won the gold over the Americans in an all-North American final. That scenario is a long shot to happen again, given that the United States, which is in Group B, is such an underdog.
SPORTS
September 12, 1987 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
All right, so maybe September is too early to play hockey. But if teams always played hockey the way Team Canada and the Soviet Union did last night in Game 1 of the Canada Cup finals, 12 months of the sport might not be enough. In a game that veteran hockey observers at the venerable Forum rated one of the greatest of all time, the Soviet Union drew first blood in the best-of- three series with a 6-5 overtime victory. Alexander Semak's goal with 5 minutes, 33 seconds gone in the sudden-death period ended a classic that kept a crowd of 14,588 cheering and standing.
SPORTS
March 21, 2001 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eric Lindros might not be playing in the NHL this season, but he can play for Team Canada at the world championships if he wants to. Bob Nicholson, president of the Canadian Hockey Association, extended the official invitation to Lindros yesterday afternoon in Calgary, where the association's headquarters are located. Coincidentally, the Flyers have a couple of days between games here before meeting the Flames on Thursday. Michael Peca, who has not played for Buffalo this season because of a contract dispute, was also invited to play for Canada in the 17-day tournament, which begins April 28 and will be held in Germany.
SPORTS
February 19, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
Across Canada, there was a single response: Whew. Sidney Crosby scored the only goal of a shootout in which an entire nation hung on every shot, giving Canada a 3-2 victory over Switzerland last night and avoiding a second inconceivable loss to the Swiss in as many Olympics. Canada, a huge favorite despite a 2-0 upset defeat to Switzerland in 2006 that ranks among the greatest in Olympic history, took a 2-0 lead early in the second and looked to be cruising. But the Swiss, with two NHL players to Canada's 23, came back to tie it on second-period goals by Ivo Ruthemann and Patrick von Gunten.
SPORTS
September 7, 1987 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It had been suggested that both Team Canada and the Soviet Union would go through the motions in their Canada Cup preliminary-round matchup, because both had semifinal berths locked up. Aw, come on. Do you really think that the world's two biggest hockey powers ever would play for fun? Last night, they played 60 minutes of very meaningful hockey, and Team Canada sent the sellout crowd of 17,056 at Copps Coliseum home happy when Wayne Gretzky scored with only 2 minutes, 27 seconds remaining to create a 3-3 tie. "Ah, you never play the Soviets for nothing," said Flyers general manager Bob Clarke, who played a lot of meaningful games against the Soviets and now is one of Team Canada's managing directors.
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NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
It's said you have to take the bad with the good. The idiom applies perfectly to the Jersey Shore, where good weather can drive a seasonal economy, and bad weather can bust it. Weeks of unrelenting hot weather during prime vacation time in July and August may ultimately mean record-setting tourism spending for 2016, maybe up by as much 2 percent over last summer. But Hermine's stormy kicker over Labor Day weekend threatened to seriously dampen the bottom line for businesses that depend on every sunny day to keep them out of the red. "We were kind of counting on this weekend to push us into where we want our bottom line to be," said Toby Ciankowski, whose family operates an ice cream stand on the Wildwood boardwalk.
SPORTS
April 7, 2016 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
The NBA draft could be set up for a needed revamping of the eligibility requirements if five-star basketball recruit Thon Maker follows through on his reported intent to declare for the 2016 draft and is allowed to enter. On Sunday, Bleacher Report columnist Adam Wells reported that Maker, a 7-1 center who plays at Orangeville District Secondary School in Ontario, Canada, will forgo college to go directly into the NBA if the league approves it. Under the current collective bargaining agreements, players applying for the draft must be 19 by the time of the draft and one year removed from their class graduating high school.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
YO, THIS presidential jawn got you thinking of moving to Canada, eh? Join the club. "How to Move to Canada" was the most-searched phrase after Donald Trump's victory on Super Tuesday, March 1. I've never been one to run away from ignorant loudmouths, but I happened to be in Canada when America lost its collective mind, and maybe it was the thin air of the Canadian Rockies, but I started trying "Canuck Helen" on for size. I had been in Alberta for just a few days, and bonded with an adorable sled dog named Apache and a Dudley-Do-Right-looking Canadian Mountie.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Dana DiFilippo, Staff Writer
It's one day before Groundhog Day and the groundhog is dead. No, not that one. Pennsylvania's own Punxsutawney Phil is just fine, resting up for his big day Tuesday. But Canada's weather-watching woodchuck, Winnipeg Willow, died Friday night, likely of old age, at the wildlife rehabilitation center where she's lived since a dog killed her mother five years ago. And Groundhog Day celebrations in Manitoba capital city have been canceled. Punxsutawney Phil's people were surprised by news of his colleague's death - but also surprised by news of her existence.
SPORTS
October 23, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
SAY IT AIN'T so, Jacques. According to a report, this season marks the first time in the the NHL's 98-year history that a majority of its players aren't Canadian-born. Former Daily News staffer Frank Seravalli, writing for Canada-based TSN, notes that Canadian-born players account for just 49.7 percent of the 690 players who have laced up their skates this season. That's a big change from 15 years ago when, according to the report, approximately 75 percent of the players were Canadian-born.
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT & WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writers brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
Update: TORONTO (AP) - The Canadian talking and tweeting hitchhiking robot that met its untimely end in the United States over the weekend might be given another chance at life. HitchBOT's co-creators Frauke Zeller and David Smith said Monday that they've been overwhelmed with support and offers to revive the robot since it was vandalized beyond repair on the streets of Philadelphia on Saturday and they are considering rebuilding it. The robot was on a hitchhiking, social experiment adventure in the U.S. after trekking across Canada and parts of Europe last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Many young Philly-area concertgoers Saturday will attend the annual Roots Picnic on Festival Pier. But at Union Transfer, a pair of dreamy, electro-pop experimentalists will be holding forth: Purity Ring and Braids. There are two full shows, the late one being ideal for picnic attendees still looking for a live gig to hit. After a hot day in the sun, a blast of Canada's finest electro-pop acts should send you home cooler. Both bands benefit from similar influences - a little Björk here, a little Crystal Castles there.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The list of Canadian singer-songwriters making their own brand of heartfelt American roots music (at least early in their careers) starts with Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Cockburn, Gordon Lightfoot, and Leonard Cohen. Blank, hilly lands; cussed winds and worse relationships - these artists know such things as well as any Heartland U.S. musician. And so do the Manitoba-based Bros. Landreth, who held court at Chestnut Street's Milkboy on Thursday night. Make no mistake. Their principal singer and songwriter, Joey Landreth, is no Young, Cohen, or Cockburn.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
ON A VISIT to Philadelphia in November, Colleen Hanycz did what most visitors do when in our midst: She ate her first cheesesteak. The Canadian native isn't sure which locale she consumed said sandwich, only remembering that the eatery was inside the Reading Terminal Market and featured a "Best of" sign. The sandwich "alone is reason to move to Philadelphia," Hanycz said yesterday. In fact, a much higher calling has attracted the married mother of three here: Hanycz was named president of La Salle University yesterday by the school's Board of Trustees.
SPORTS
January 25, 2015 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
COLUMBUS, Ohio - With each cent the Canadian dollar drops in relation to its American counterpart, so too may Ron Hextall's chances to hasten the Flyers' rebuild. At the NHL's Board of Governors meetings in Florida in early December, commissioner Gary Bettman suggested next season's salary cap might rise to $73 million from this year's $69 million limit. When he made that prediction, the Canadian loonie was trading at 89 cents to one American dollar. Yesterday, it closed at 80 cents on the market.
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