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SPORTS
September 17, 2008 | by Paul Vigna
A chronological list of the former Steelers who have died since 2000 under age 60. Steve Furness: Feb. 9, 2000, 49, heart attack. Tyrone McGriff: Dec. 9, 2000, 42, heart attack. Joe Gilliam: Dec. 25, 2000, 49, heart attack. Mike Webster: Sept. 24, 2002, 50, heart attack. Ron Shanklin: April 17, 2003, 55, cancer. Fred Small: June 24, 2003, 39, his motorcycle collided with two cars on the Pomona (Calif.) Freeway. James Parrish: March 10, 2004, 35, cancer.
NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
SPORTS
September 5, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Waiting for Marco Dapkey was a promise-filled senior football season. His Neshaminy High coaches had selected him to be one of the squad's captains, he was expected to be a two-way contributor for the Redskins, and recruiting interest was growing. All that changed June 13. Struggling with his breathing the night before and into the morning, a panicked Dapkey woke his mother, Rita. That prompted a short trip to Aria Health Bucks County, where physicians, Rita Dapkey said, thought at first that Marco might have a serious sinus infection, or maybe pneumonia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2016
ISSUE | MEDICINE It's fine for cancer centers to run ads about their successes The story about cancer centers' ads painted the picture in broad strokes ("Report: Many cancer center ads are selling hype as hope," Tuesday). As a Fox Chase patient who very likely has the same "rare gastrointestinal tumor" as the man in Sunday's ad, I am familiar with the drug he was likely given 15 years ago during a clinical trial. There are only three drugs for the gastrointestinal stomal tumor (GIST)
NEWS
July 14, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH Cancer a blessing When I received my diagnosis of Stage 4 pancreatic cancer, I went through all five stages of grief before realizing how fortunate I was in so many ways I had never felt before. Every day became a joy to behold. I am still alive with my wonderful family. Money issues, grudges, arguing over small stuff, ignoring the simple pleasures of life - a good book, friends, poker with the guys, a walk, a sunset - are miracles. Why waste time sweating the small stuff when there are chemotherapy treatments every two weeks, with all the pain and torment they entail?
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
The amount of advertising by cancer centers has exploded over the past decade - and so have come-ons that emotionally manipulate or even mislead patients. That is the bottom line of a study and accompanying editorial published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. "Cancer center advertisements generally make appeals based on emotion - not fact," wrote Steven Woloshin, a physician and a medical communication researcher with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice in New Hampshire.
NEWS
July 13, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH Nearly everyone needs to take Vitamin D supplements The Institute of Medicine's recommendations on optimum levels of Vitamin D have been discredited by the Harvard School of Public Health and many others ("Vitamin D: How much we need, and how to get it," Sunday). The lowest level of Vitamin D that can be considered normal is 32 nanograms per milliliter. Many experts say that 40 to 60 nanograms is the ideal level. It's just about impossible to get enough Vitamin D from food.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Men with metastatic prostate cancer have a surprisingly high rate of inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes, suggesting that all men with such advanced prostate cancer should be considered for genetic testing, a new study concludes. Genetic testing is not recommended for men with cancer confined to the prostate - or men whose cancer later spreads - because studies have found less than 5 percent have defective DNA-repair genes. But the prevalence of such defects among men who are initially diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer has been unclear, according to the new study, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers from six leading cancer centers in the United States and Britain.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
 A Bucks County woman who faked having terminal cancer has reached an agreement to pay nearly $50,000 in restitution and penalties. Danielle Kunkel, of Newtown, collected more than $36,000 in charitable donations after falsely claiming to have an aggressive form of lymphoma, according to the state Attorney General's Office. The office said Thursday that it had reached a settlement with Kunkel, who was never diagnosed with the cancer. Kunkel collected the funds after claiming that she faced more than $1 million in medical expenses and needed to travel to Germany for treatment, prompting her family and friends to hold a range of fund-raising events, authorities said.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania this week became the 41st state to pass controversial legislation aimed at making oral cancer drugs more affordable for patients. The bill, which passed both chambers of the legislature unanimously Thursday, was headed to Gov. Wolf, whose office said Friday that he would sign it into law. Out-of-pocket costs for intravenous chemotherapy - which requires going to a medical office for infusions - are much lower than patients' costs...
BUSINESS
July 1, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper, in Camden, will begin accepting patients early next month in a new 30-bed inpatient oncology unit at Cooper University Hospital at a cost of $13.5 million, Cooper said Wednesday. The unit of private rooms on the fifth floor of Cooper's Roberts Pavilion will replace an existing set of semi-private rooms for cancer inpatients in the Kelemen Building. In its most recent disclosure to bond holders, Cooper said it treated 24,268 oncology outpatients in the three months ended March 31, up 26 percent from the same period the year before.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Drug maker Merck announced Wednesday a licensing agreement with a suburban Boston biotech company to develop and commercialize personalized cancer vaccines. Merck, which employs 9,200 in Montgomery County, will pay Moderna Therapeutics Inc. $200 million in cash. The Cambridge, Mass. company will do early research and development of its protein therapies based on "messenger RNA" or mRNA technology, which targets the unique properties of an individual's cancer, and carry development into clinical trials.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
Less than 5 percent of adult cancer patients take part in the clinical trials critical to finding new treatments, a network of patient advocates reported Wednesday. The Cancer Support Community, an international group with chapters in major cities, released the numbers at a Philadelphia news conference that highlighted an ongoing campaign to increase awareness in the hope of reducing cancer deaths. The organization surveyed 506 patients and 81 caregivers about their beliefs, experiences, and information related to clinical trial participation.
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