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NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
September 5, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Waiting for Marco Dapkey was a promise-filled senior football season. His Neshaminy High coaches had selected him to be one of the squad's captains, he was expected to be a two-way contributor for the Redskins, and recruiting interest was growing. All that changed June 13. Struggling with his breathing the night before and into the morning, a panicked Dapkey woke his mother, Rita. That prompted a short trip to Aria Health Bucks County, where physicians, Rita Dapkey said, thought at first that Marco might have a serious sinus infection, or maybe pneumonia.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As an actor, Forrest Jones' job is to portray dramatic roles with depth and feeling. But his most demanding role has been in real life - a 15-year ordeal with cancer. Jones, whose cancer has been in remission since 1988, will perform tonight in the opening of Hedgerow Theater's two-hour Christmas production, The Medieval English Mystery Plays, a cycle of nine vignettes. "I never really considered dying. I always figured I would be able to beat it and not have it beat me," Jones, 53, said at the George Washington Carver Community Center here, where he leads a youth drama troupe.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | Kerry McKean Kelly
Kerry McKean Kelly is on the board of Kelly's Heroes, a New Jersey-based nonprofit that raises money for pancreatic cancer research. It's been a year since my husband, Steve, died of pancreatic cancer at age 55. And still, there's a magnet on the side of our refrigerator with the phone number of the oncology hotline and Steve's wonderful nurse, Ellen. I'm not quite sure why I haven't removed that magnet. It might be that I just can't accept the finality that would bring.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
The idea of a "marriage advantage" to health and happiness has existed for well over 150 years, and still appears to persist when it comes to cancer. For a pair of studies published Monday in the journal Cancer, researchers Scarlett Lin Gomez of the Cancer Prevention Institute of California and María Elena Martínez of the University of California-San Diego looked at records from about 800,000 American adults diagnosed in 2000 to 2009 with invasive cancer. They sliced the data by income, race, insurance status, and other factors and found that unmarried cancer patients are suffering from higher death rates than their married counterparts.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
On April 9, the Philly NCAA Division I men's basketball coaches hosted the 13th annual Coaches vs. Cancer Gala at Philadelphia Park Hyatt at the Bellevue. Coaches vs. Cancer is a nationwide partnership with the American Cancer Society and the National Association of Basketball Coaches that engages coaches and their teams and communities to join the fight against cancer. The more than 550 attendees included St. Joseph's coach Phil Martelli, Temple's Fran Dunphy, Penn's Steve Donahue, La Salle's John Giannini, and, of course, Jay Wright, coach of the 2016 national champions, the Villanova Wildcats.
NEWS
April 16, 2016
ISSUE | CANCER Providing options Thanks for tackling the difficult and delicate subject of women who are diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy ("When pregnancy and cancer collide," Sunday). Dr. Elyce Cardonick's pregnancy registry helps women and their doctors understand how first-class cancer treatment and pregnancy care can be given at the same time. Breast cancer is the cancer most commonly diagnosed during pregnancy. We at Living Beyond Breast Cancer are working with Cardonick on a publication that will provide treatment options and resources.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Billionaire tech guru Sean Parker on Wednesday announced a $250 million effort to accelerate development of revolutionary cancer technology by uniting the University of Pennsylvania and five other leading research centers. Each of the centers has received an initial $10 million to $15 million grant to team with the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. Among its goals is sharing the kind of data and discoveries that normally are guarded closely as the bases for patents and profits.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Nineteen years ago, Elyce Cardonick got a call about a newly diagnosed lymphoma patient whose fast-growing chest tumor was causing severe breathing problems. The cancer patient was 13 weeks pregnant and had rejected her oncologist's advice to abort before starting toxic chemotherapy. Cardonick, a young maternal-fetal medicine specialist then at Jefferson University Hospital , discovered that little was known about treating cancer during pregnancy. The issue became her calling, inspiring her to create the Pregnancy and Cancer Registry to collect data about treatment and long-term results for both mothers and children.
NEWS
April 10, 2016
Q. I have been diagnosed with cancer. What is going to happen now? A. According to the American Cancer Society, in 2015 there were an estimated 1.6 million new cancer cases diagnosed and 590,430 cancer deaths in the United States. After a cancer diagnosis, you may be unsure about what comes next. For many, the toughest parts are learning to cope with the diagnosis and understanding the types of cancer and the treatment process. A cancer diagnosis will also bring many changes for you and your loved ones.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | Catherine Ormerod
This week, 26 people with metastatic breast cancer - the kind of cancer that cannot yet be cured - will come together in Philadelphia. The group, an eclectic one that shares a common purpose, includes 25 women and a man with breast cancer. He is a retired Air Force colonel, one of a few thousand men who each year receive this surprising diagnosis. "I want to be involved in a more direct conversation about cancer," he said. Selected from 161 applicants, they are the second class of the "Hear My Voice" outreach volunteer program, which takes place at Living Beyond Breast Cancer's annual Metastatic Breast Cancer Conference.
NEWS
April 6, 2016
ISSUE | CANCER Help patients now As an institution that cares for many of Pennsylvania's cancer patients, the Penn State Cancer Institute was thrilled about Vice President Biden's "moonshot" to accelerate the development of treatments and cures. But we can't forget about the nearly 700,000 Pennsylvania cancer patients who need treatment today. House Bill 60, the Oral Chemotherapy Parity Act, would provide affordable access to oral anticancer medications. An outdated insurance law makes these medications cost-prohibitive for many patients, especially compared with intravenous chemotherapy.
NEWS
April 3, 2016 | By John N. McGuire, Staff Writer
For the last four years, musician Nick Wright has composed music for vocal groups at Cherry Hill High School East. On Saturday, the students will give back with 25 performances to benefit Wright's girlfriend, Ali Webb, in a night-time fund-raiser to help with her mounting medical bills. Wright, 25, of Cincinnati, said Webb, 24, was diagnosed with liver cancer in May 2015. Since then, the cancer has spread into her right lung, moving her to Stage 4. Wright said he met his girlfriend during their freshman year at Miami University while the two were playing in the school's marching band.
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