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NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. - The summer's coolest temperatures and a sky as crystalline as Boston's John Hancock Tower, which glimmered on the near horizon, infused Boston College's stony, tony campus with a hint of autumn and football on this August Friday. As if they felt it, too, a family of visitors posed at the Doug Flutie statue outside Alumni Stadium, parents and children wrapped around the sculpted depiction of the Eagles quarterback as he wound up, Juan Marichal-like, to unleash his legendary Hail Mary pass.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
September 5, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Waiting for Marco Dapkey was a promise-filled senior football season. His Neshaminy High coaches had selected him to be one of the squad's captains, he was expected to be a two-way contributor for the Redskins, and recruiting interest was growing. All that changed June 13. Struggling with his breathing the night before and into the morning, a panicked Dapkey woke his mother, Rita. That prompted a short trip to Aria Health Bucks County, where physicians, Rita Dapkey said, thought at first that Marco might have a serious sinus infection, or maybe pneumonia.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Next month, Thomas G. Frazier will sit down with colleagues at Bryn Mawr Hospital's Comprehensive Breast Center and unseal the results of a blind study for Dune Medical's MarginProbe. The four-month, 30-patient study is the second conducted at Bryn Mawr on the new diagnostic tool designed to help breast cancer surgeons determine - within minutes - whether they have removed all the malignant tissue during a lumpectomy and reduced the need for later surgery. If the second study is positive, the device could become a key tool for breast cancer surgeons at Bryn Mawr and elsewhere.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAR therapy for cancer has moved into the fast lane. The University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia on Thursday published the latest results of their novel "chimeric antigen receptor" - CAR - immune therapy. Of 25 children and five adults with end-stage leukemia, 90 percent saw their cancer disappear and 67 percent were cancer-free six months later. The longest remission has lasted almost three years. The Food and Drug Administration in July gave the CAR therapy "breakthrough" designation, intended to expedite its approval.
SPORTS
October 13, 2014 | By Avery Maehrer, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a rainy afternoon, the color pink brightened the field. At Upper Dublin on Saturday, the Cardinals and players from visiting Methacton wore pink shirts, socks, and headbands in recognition of the sixth annual Corners for Cancer event. Even the field hockey balls were pink, as the Warriors defeated Upper Dublin, 3-0, in a nonleague game. Methacton jumped out to a 1-0 lead less than six minutes into the first half, with freshman forward Olivia Hoover firing the ball into the net off an assist from Julia Dickinson.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Roman Catholic and Massachusetts basketball standout Lari Ketner, 37, died Friday morning after a year-long battle with colon cancer. After starring for Roman (Class of 1995), the 6-foot-10 Ketner went on to play for UMass for three seasons. Drafted by the Chicago Bulls with the 49th pick of the 1999 NBA draft, he ended up playing for the Bulls (1999-2000), Cleveland Cavaliers (1999-2000), and Indiana Pacers (2000-01). Ketner, who helped the Cahillites to a 27-3 record and their sixth straight Catholic League championship in 1994, played with a few minor-league teams after his brief NBA career.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Milken, the long-retired 1980s junk-bond king and now big-time prostate cancer philanthropist, blew into the Wanamaker's Crystal Tea Room on Tuesday evening for one of the city's bigger and faster-growing charitable events. He jets around the nation to about 100 of these events a year, flying into Philadelphia on Tuesday from Dallas and planning to immediately depart Philadelphia for Washington. "I see light at the end of the tunnel," Milken said of cancer cures, adding that he believed philanthropists like those in Philadelphia had to support young scientists as the federal government has curtailed medical-research funding in recent years.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
"What's a brush? What's a comb? What's a bad hair day? Can you please remind me?" Tom Gillin, a bald cancer patient, raps into a mirror with an equally bald doctor at his side. Both are sporting curly blond wigs. "I celebrate my time here," Gillin says later in his music video about life with cancer at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. A 19-year-old who was discharged from the hospital Sept. 12 after five months of care for leukemia, Gillin created a parody rap video to two of Jay Z's songs.
SPORTS
September 26, 2014 | Staff Report
BENGALS defensive tackle Devon Still was overcome with scores of joyful emotion yesteday. Still took to Instagram to announce his 4-year-old daughter, Leah, had successful cancer surgery at Philadelphia Children's Hosptial of Philadelphia. "After a 5 hour, 50 minute surgery the surgeon was able to remove ALL of her tumor and all of her lymph nodes and her right adrenal gland where it all started from," Still wrote. "Best news I've received in a long time. " Leah Still was was diagnosed with Stage 4 neuroblastoma, a form of pediatric cancer, in June.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kristine Warner wanted an eye-catching way to encourage men to talk to their doctors about the complicated, controversial subject of prostate cancer screening. Don't Fear The Finger campaign was born. Go ahead and snicker. It got your attention. The finger in question, of course, is the one a physician puts up a man's rectum to feel for cancer in his prostate gland. The rectal exam is usually paired with a PSA blood test. Warner, a graphic designer, former lobbyist, and urologist's daughter, is the volunteer director of the Pennsylvania Prostate Cancer Coalition.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merck & Co. said on Sept. 4 that the Food and Drug Administration approved what Merck said was a groundbreaking cancer treatment that it hopes will cure many patients and generate billions of dollars in revenue. On the same day, Bristol-Myers Squibb said bunk to that, alleging patent infringement in a lawsuit in federal court in Delaware, where both global pharmaceutical giants are registered. Bristol-Myers, whose version of that type of cancer drug was approved in Japan in July, hoped the legal move would thwart Merck in the industry race to sell expensive cancer medicine.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
For the eight years since her diagnosis in 2006, drugs, surgery, and chemotherapy had kept Debra Hinkle's breast cancer at bay. But now, the conventional treatments were failing, and the disease was spreading. So when her oncologist decided it was time for the Bucks County woman to consider relatively untested therapies, she was more than willing. "I thought that if I didn't do a clinical trial now, maybe I wouldn't be able to later," said Hinkle, 54, who lives in Newtown Township and works as a software-development project manager.
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