CollectionsCancer
IN THE NEWS

Cancer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. - The summer's coolest temperatures and a sky as crystalline as Boston's John Hancock Tower, which glimmered on the near horizon, infused Boston College's stony, tony campus with a hint of autumn and football on this August Friday. As if they felt it, too, a family of visitors posed at the Doug Flutie statue outside Alumni Stadium, parents and children wrapped around the sculpted depiction of the Eagles quarterback as he wound up, Juan Marichal-like, to unleash his legendary Hail Mary pass.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As an actor, Forrest Jones' job is to portray dramatic roles with depth and feeling. But his most demanding role has been in real life - a 15-year ordeal with cancer. Jones, whose cancer has been in remission since 1988, will perform tonight in the opening of Hedgerow Theater's two-hour Christmas production, The Medieval English Mystery Plays, a cycle of nine vignettes. "I never really considered dying. I always figured I would be able to beat it and not have it beat me," Jones, 53, said at the George Washington Carver Community Center here, where he leads a youth drama troupe.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 22, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cooper University Health Care, even before its takeover last month of emergency medical services in Camden, was flexing its muscles in South Jersey's thriving health-care market. Long a center for complex care in South Jersey, but hampered by its location in poverty-stricken Camden, Cooper has been expanding since 2012, opening a new patient tower, a medical school, and the MD Anderson Cancer Center. The payoff shows in rising patient revenue and strong gains in operating profit, though an expert doubts that it can last.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jenny and Matt Stuetz have two things on their mind at all times: her cancer and their children. The Willow Grove couple were devastated when Jenny, 43, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. But their focus since then has been on keeping her healthy while also keeping the lives of their children - son Jackson, now 8, and daughter Madison, now 7 - as normal as possible. So for at least one week this summer, the children were able to shed some of their worries at Camp KIDS, a program of Gilda's Club in Warminster.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN 1983, Nick Forgione's surgeon gave him five years to live after removing two malignant tumors from his colon and installing a colostomy bag. "They wanted to do chemotherapy and radiation treatments," Nick told the Daily News ' Dan Geringer in 2001. "I told them to go to hell and fired my surgeon. " Instead, Nick had a conversation with a higher authority. "I had committed every sin that you could commit with a knife and fork," he told Geringer. "I went to Mass at St. Christopher's and I said, 'Dear Lord, I didn't come in here to ask, 'Why me?
NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The duPont Hospital for Children had too few of the little wagons that young patients prefer to wheelchairs, so Peter Zucca started a foundation to raise money for a fleet of them. A patient couldn't get blood for a transfusion, so Peter planned a series of drives, the first to be held Monday. And when he saw that most books about the challenge of childhood hearing loss "are really bad," he wrote his own. At age 12, Peter Zucca has already had a world of experience with cancer.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 50 years after the Epstein-Barr virus was discovered to cause human cancers, there are no good treatment options for the 200,000 new cases diagnosed annually, most of them in the world's poorest places. The Wistar Institute aims to change that. The illustrious Philadelphia research center last month received a three-year, $5.6 million grant from the Wellcome Trust in London to continue developing a novel anti-viral drug. "We certainly hope that this first-in-class drug we are developing will slow the progression or - even better - cure these deadly cancers," said Wistar senior scientist Troy Messick.
NEWS
June 12, 2015
THERE ARE as many types of courage as there are personalities and human struggles. There isn't a blueprint with bullet points to follow, although I think we'd all agree that soldiers, police officers and firefighters are entitled to an automatic assumption of heroism (until and unless they contradict it by their actions). But basically, courage comes in many colors, cadences and creeds. The teenager afflicted with an inoperable brain cancer who continues to play basketball until she can no longer hold the ball is the epitome of courage, more so than the young woman who, afflicted with a similar form of cancer, chooses to commit suicide and avoid the pain.
SPORTS
May 31, 2015 | By Jesse Dougherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 10 years, Martin Truex Jr. and Sherry Pollex have started almost every race the same way. Just before the national anthem, Truex, who will race in Sunday's NASCAR event at Dover Speedway, stands with his No. 78 car on one side and Pollex on the other. He holds his girlfriend's hand. They pray during the song. When it's over, they hug and tell each other "I love you" before he climbs into the cockpit. "You don't stand by your car without your loved one before you get into a race car and start going 200 miles per hour," Pollex said.
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since the discovery more than 30 years ago of a protein shed by tumor cells in the ovaries, researchers have tried unsuccessfully to use it for an ovarian-cancer screening test. Now, a mammoth, long-awaited United Kingdom study has had some success by tracking rapid changes in blood levels of the protein, CA125, rather than simply elevations above a presumed normal. A key to this screening strategy is an ovarian-cancer risk formula, or algorithm, developed over many years by a Harvard biostatistician with help from oncologists, including ones at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SANDRA L. STIBBINS would have been out there yesterday, marching with the other cancer patients and survivors in the annual Susan G. Komen Philadelphia Race for the Cure. She made every march in recent years, dressed in the pink costume that every marcher wears, symbolic of this Mother's Day event in the ceaseless battle against cancer. But this year Sandra couldn't make it. She died of cancer May 2 at age 57. An ebullient, high-spirited woman, she would have been laughing and waving at the crowds along the line of march, as she did every year.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheryle Goldberg, 69, an almost 37-year survivor, has walked in every one of the 25 Philadelphia breast cancer walks on Mother's Day. In honor of her longevity - and the event's 25th anniversary - on Sunday, she led the emotional and ceremonial survivors' parade down the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. What made the day most significant for the Warminster woman - diagnosed in 1978, when for so many a diagnosis was a death sentence -...
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|