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NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
September 5, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Waiting for Marco Dapkey was a promise-filled senior football season. His Neshaminy High coaches had selected him to be one of the squad's captains, he was expected to be a two-way contributor for the Redskins, and recruiting interest was growing. All that changed June 13. Struggling with his breathing the night before and into the morning, a panicked Dapkey woke his mother, Rita. That prompted a short trip to Aria Health Bucks County, where physicians, Rita Dapkey said, thought at first that Marco might have a serious sinus infection, or maybe pneumonia.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As an actor, Forrest Jones' job is to portray dramatic roles with depth and feeling. But his most demanding role has been in real life - a 15-year ordeal with cancer. Jones, whose cancer has been in remission since 1988, will perform tonight in the opening of Hedgerow Theater's two-hour Christmas production, The Medieval English Mystery Plays, a cycle of nine vignettes. "I never really considered dying. I always figured I would be able to beat it and not have it beat me," Jones, 53, said at the George Washington Carver Community Center here, where he leads a youth drama troupe.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Soon after Pennsylvania's breast density notification law took effect in 2014, Jules Sumkin found himself wanting to spare women from getting a letter that might alarm or perplex them. Twenty-eight states, including New Jersey and Delaware, now have laws that require mammography centers to inform women with dense breast tissue that it may increase the risk of cancer and obscure a malignancy on a mammogram, so they may want to talk to their doctors about extra imaging options. The letters don't mention quandaries that Sumkin, chair of radiology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, knows too well: There are no guidelines for extra imaging, or any evidence that it saves lives.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Michael J. Ferguson, 64, of Ardmore, a broadcast producer, adjunct professor, and mentor to many, died Aug. 3, of stomach cancer at his family's home in Narberth. He was the second oldest of eight children born in Chicago to Thomas and Frances Ferguson. "Michael was the perfect big brother to everyone in our family," his brother Steve said. Mr. Ferguson graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1969 and Villanova University in 1973, majoring in education and the classics.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
The lady was a tramp. That was part of her charm. Scarred, a tad surly. An alpha female if there ever was one. Duchess was her name. Liz Hardt, a softie for a tough dog, was smitten. "I fell in love with her immediately," said Hardt, a veterinary nurse. "She was a big, bad dog. " But there was something else. A kind of bond. Hardt was a cancer survivor. Duchess was, too. The pair met through a program that gives new meaning to the saying, "Who rescued whom?" Through the Shelter Canine Mammary Tumor Program, breast tumors are removed from homeless dogs that would otherwise go untreated and quite likely die. The dogs are then put up for adoption.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
It's always important to eat wisely, even more so when you're sick. When it comes to cancer, however, researchers are discovering tantalizing new evidence that a patient's diet can actually help shrink tumors. Nicole Simone, a radiation oncologist at Thomas Jefferson University's Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center , has been studying the effect of diet on standard therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy to see whether what you eat can make a difference. So far, it appears that it does.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
In the past school year, 70,000 face-painted, tutu-wearing, dancing students raised more than $5.5 million to fight childhood cancer, the fund-raising group Four Diamonds announced Friday. The students, most of them either in middle school or high school, raised the money through programs modeled after THON, Pennsylvania State University's annual dance marathon. Mini-THON has raised has raised more than $23 million since 1993, according to a news release from Penn State. The money raised goes for clinical care of pediatric cancer patients at Penn State Children's Hospital and for research at its College of Medicine.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
Vice President Biden, during a speech Wednesday night in Center City, called for national urgency in speeding new research and treatments as part of the White House's "cancer moonshot" initiative. Biden gave his nearly 40-minute talk after receiving the 2016 Atlas Award, presented by the World Affairs Council at the Hyatt at the Bellevue. The award was given to the vice president for his role leading the cancer initiative, launched this year. Biden's son Beau, Delaware's former attorney general, died of brain cancer last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Doherty battles cancer Shannen Doherty is sharing her battle with breast cancer. The Beverly Hills, 90210 star has posted pics on Instagram that show her cutting her shoulder-length hair, then shaving her head. (Chemotherapy causes heavy hair loss.) Doherty, 45, tells the The Dr. Oz Show that if necessary, she has no qualms about undergoing a mastectomy. "Ultimately, they're just breasts, right?" she says. "I mean, I love them. . . . But in the grand scheme of things, I would rather be alive, and I would rather grow old with my husband.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, STAFF WRITER
A new study documents a decade-long increase in the number of men who have incurable prostate cancer at their initial diagnosis, an ominous finding that prostate cancer-screening proponents have been predicting. Both screening and diagnosis of early-stage prostate cancer have declined, coinciding with recommendations from an influential government advisory panel. In 2008, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said not to do routine PSA blood testing of men over age 74. And in 2012, it said to not screen any men - not even those at high risk - because the harms of unnecessary treatment outweigh the benefits of catching cancer early.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Kerry McKean Kelly, For The Inquirer
I am sitting here with tears in my eyes and anger in my heart. I just learned that the cancer clinical trial that my husband enrolled in - gambled on, you could say - didn't work. The data show that the pancreatic cancer patients such as my husband who received an experimental combination of two immunotherapy drugs actually died a few months earlier, on average, than those who received the standard chemotherapy treatment. The results were so disappointing that the trial has been halted.
NEWS
July 15, 2016
ISSUE | MEDICINE It's fine for cancer centers to run ads about their successes The story about cancer centers' ads painted the picture in broad strokes ("Report: Many cancer center ads are selling hype as hope," Tuesday). As a Fox Chase patient who very likely has the same "rare gastrointestinal tumor" as the man in Sunday's ad, I am familiar with the drug he was likely given 15 years ago during a clinical trial. There are only three drugs for the gastrointestinal stomal tumor (GIST)
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