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Cancer

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NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When she found out early in her pregnancy that one of her identical twins would die at birth, Sarah Gray began a five-year journey that culminated last week in Philadelphia. She had to carry the sick baby to term in order to protect his healthy twin. And she also looked into organ and tissue donation. "Instead of thinking of our son as a victim," she said, "I started thinking of him as a contributor to research, to science. " On March 23, 2010, Thomas and Callum Gray were born at Fairfax Hospital in Virginia.
NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
SPORTS
September 5, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Waiting for Marco Dapkey was a promise-filled senior football season. His Neshaminy High coaches had selected him to be one of the squad's captains, he was expected to be a two-way contributor for the Redskins, and recruiting interest was growing. All that changed June 13. Struggling with his breathing the night before and into the morning, a panicked Dapkey woke his mother, Rita. That prompted a short trip to Aria Health Bucks County, where physicians, Rita Dapkey said, thought at first that Marco might have a serious sinus infection, or maybe pneumonia.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. - The summer's coolest temperatures and a sky as crystalline as Boston's John Hancock Tower, which glimmered on the near horizon, infused Boston College's stony, tony campus with a hint of autumn and football on this August Friday. As if they felt it, too, a family of visitors posed at the Doug Flutie statue outside Alumni Stadium, parents and children wrapped around the sculpted depiction of the Eagles quarterback as he wound up, Juan Marichal-like, to unleash his legendary Hail Mary pass.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
GlaxoSmithKline plc and Novartis AG said Friday that they had struck a deal for Novartis to pay GSK at least $300 million, and perhaps more than $1 billion, for the remaining rights to the drug ofatumumab. The drug already is approved for use in treating some cancers and is sold by Novartis under the name Arzerra. Novartis now will have the rights for any use of ofatumumab approved by regulators, most importantly multiple sclerosis. GSK gets $300 million when the deal is closed, $200 million if Novartis starts a phase III clinical study of ofatumumab in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, and contingent payments of up to $534 million if other development milestones are achieved.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
TATTLE HAS TO admit that we didn't see this coming. And we're pretty ashamed of ourselves for missing it. Reality-TV star and conservative lobbyist Josh Duggar - of TLC's "19 Kids and Counting" and molesting-his-sisters fame - had an Ashley Madison account. Ashley Madison, as many of you know (and hope your spouses don't) is a website created for the express purpose of helping married people cheat on their husbands or wives. Gawker.com reported that data released online in the wake of the hack on Ashley Madison shows that someone using a credit card belonging to a Joshua J. Duggar, and billed to the Fayetteville, Ark., address of his grandmother Mary , paid nearly $1,000 for two monthly Ashley Madison subscriptions from February of 2013 until May of 2015.
NEWS
August 14, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I'm writing in response to "Not Talking About the Future," whose wife has breast cancer, was told she has only a few years to live and feels sad when her kids talk about their futures. My dad was diagnosed with stage four multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer, in 2006. He was told that even the most aggressive treatment would buy him only two or three more years. Well, he's now working on year nine. While I must admit that it's been hard at times for me to stay positive about his prognosis, I try not to let it show.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Marjorie Stromberg and Sean Miller decided to get married, they knew they might face fertility problems stemming from her chemotherapy for leukemia at age 12. The idea of fertility treatment didn't faze them. Parenthood was a cherished goal. They even had a name for a girl: Adele. What they couldn't foresee was that the prospect of pregnancy would become not just daunting, but unacceptably risky. In the months after their engagement in 2011, Marjorie, then 26, was diagnosed with breast cancer, as well as a rare genetic susceptibility to multiple cancers.
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steve Sewell hadn't given much thought to forgiveness until he started visiting his friend Ouida Coley while she was getting treatment for metastic breast cancer. Her hospital offered support groups for people who struggle with unforgiveness - the toxic anger and aggravation that comes from holding on to grudges and blame. A former chaplain there wrote a book about it after noticing that many of the patients he saw were burdened by unresolved hurt and guilt. Sewell, a testicular cancer survivor from West Chester, saw the book the first time he visited Coley.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cooper University Health Care, even before its takeover last month of emergency medical services in Camden, was flexing its muscles in South Jersey's thriving health-care market. Long a center for complex care in South Jersey, but hampered by its location in poverty-stricken Camden, Cooper has been expanding since 2012, opening a new patient tower, a medical school, and the MD Anderson Cancer Center. The payoff shows in rising patient revenue and strong gains in operating profit, though an expert doubts that it can last.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jenny and Matt Stuetz have two things on their mind at all times: her cancer and their children. The Willow Grove couple were devastated when Jenny, 43, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. But their focus since then has been on keeping her healthy while also keeping the lives of their children - son Jackson, now 8, and daughter Madison, now 7 - as normal as possible. So for at least one week this summer, the children were able to shed some of their worries at Camp KIDS, a program of Gilda's Club in Warminster.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN 1983, Nick Forgione's surgeon gave him five years to live after removing two malignant tumors from his colon and installing a colostomy bag. "They wanted to do chemotherapy and radiation treatments," Nick told the Daily News ' Dan Geringer in 2001. "I told them to go to hell and fired my surgeon. " Instead, Nick had a conversation with a higher authority. "I had committed every sin that you could commit with a knife and fork," he told Geringer. "I went to Mass at St. Christopher's and I said, 'Dear Lord, I didn't come in here to ask, 'Why me?
NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The duPont Hospital for Children had too few of the little wagons that young patients prefer to wheelchairs, so Peter Zucca started a foundation to raise money for a fleet of them. A patient couldn't get blood for a transfusion, so Peter planned a series of drives, the first to be held Monday. And when he saw that most books about the challenge of childhood hearing loss "are really bad," he wrote his own. At age 12, Peter Zucca has already had a world of experience with cancer.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 50 years after the Epstein-Barr virus was discovered to cause human cancers, there are no good treatment options for the 200,000 new cases diagnosed annually, most of them in the world's poorest places. The Wistar Institute aims to change that. The illustrious Philadelphia research center last month received a three-year, $5.6 million grant from the Wellcome Trust in London to continue developing a novel anti-viral drug. "We certainly hope that this first-in-class drug we are developing will slow the progression or - even better - cure these deadly cancers," said Wistar senior scientist Troy Messick.
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