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NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. - The summer's coolest temperatures and a sky as crystalline as Boston's John Hancock Tower, which glimmered on the near horizon, infused Boston College's stony, tony campus with a hint of autumn and football on this August Friday. As if they felt it, too, a family of visitors posed at the Doug Flutie statue outside Alumni Stadium, parents and children wrapped around the sculpted depiction of the Eagles quarterback as he wound up, Juan Marichal-like, to unleash his legendary Hail Mary pass.
SPORTS
September 5, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Waiting for Marco Dapkey was a promise-filled senior football season. His Neshaminy High coaches had selected him to be one of the squad's captains, he was expected to be a two-way contributor for the Redskins, and recruiting interest was growing. All that changed June 13. Struggling with his breathing the night before and into the morning, a panicked Dapkey woke his mother, Rita. That prompted a short trip to Aria Health Bucks County, where physicians, Rita Dapkey said, thought at first that Marco might have a serious sinus infection, or maybe pneumonia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since the discovery more than 30 years ago of a protein shed by tumor cells in the ovaries, researchers have tried unsuccessfully to use it for an ovarian-cancer screening test. Now, a mammoth, long-awaited United Kingdom study has had some success by tracking rapid changes in blood levels of the protein, CA125, rather than simply elevations above a presumed normal. A key to this screening strategy is an ovarian-cancer risk formula, or algorithm, developed over many years by a Harvard biostatistician with help from oncologists, including ones at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SANDRA L. STIBBINS would have been out there yesterday, marching with the other cancer patients and survivors in the annual Susan G. Komen Philadelphia Race for the Cure. She made every march in recent years, dressed in the pink costume that every marcher wears, symbolic of this Mother's Day event in the ceaseless battle against cancer. But this year Sandra couldn't make it. She died of cancer May 2 at age 57. An ebullient, high-spirited woman, she would have been laughing and waving at the crowds along the line of march, as she did every year.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheryle Goldberg, 69, an almost 37-year survivor, has walked in every one of the 25 Philadelphia breast cancer walks on Mother's Day. In honor of her longevity - and the event's 25th anniversary - on Sunday, she led the emotional and ceremonial survivors' parade down the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. What made the day most significant for the Warminster woman - diagnosed in 1978, when for so many a diagnosis was a death sentence -...
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Personalized cancer therapy is no longer just an exciting prospect, and better survival rates - as well as escalating spending - are proving it. "It's here. It's definitely here," said Pasi Jänne, an oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. "Today, it's the most effective way to treat patients: figure out the genetic fingerprint of an individual's cancer and tailor the therapies to it. " This year, President Obama announced an initiative focused on "precision medicine.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The guests of honor at the St. Christopher's Hospital for Children "prom" hit the red carpet on Saturday well after the paparazzi - staff, family members, and a few professional photographers - had staked out key vantage points along the red velvet ropes. Finally, 55 children with cancer strode out or rolled in as their names were announced one by one. The girls wore frilly, shiny dresses. Most of the boys were in black suits. Little Liam, who had just turned 1, went first, in his father's arms.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
Milton Alexander Wohl had a message for those attending his funeral. Don't smoke. He had specifically requested that the rabbi say "Don't smoke" during the service. And the rabbi agreed. "People were kind of shocked," Joan Wohl, Dr. Wohl's wife of 63 years, said. "But that was how strongly he felt. " Dr. Wohl, 90, of Center City, died Monday, April 20, after a battle with bladder cancer at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He had been a smoker and wanted people to know that smoking is directly related to bladder cancer.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Seffrin, 70, chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society, will retire next Friday after 40 years with the venerable nonprofit cancer-fighting organization, including 23 at the helm. In an interview this week, he talked about some of the 102-year-old society's accomplishments under his leadership, financial issues, and his plans.   Progress against cancer In 2009, the society (ACS) trademarked the slogan "Official sponsor of birthdays" to highlight that its work to prevent cancer, detect it early, and improve treatment helps people live longer.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
Tyler McCormack isn't exactly shy, but by the standards of his position on the lacrosse field, he's on the quiet side. He's not the type of goalie to bang his stick on the pipes or fire up his team. He said he's not really a "yeller. " Instead, he tries to lead by example. And it's in that area - leading by example - that McCormack really shines. When this season started, the Seneca junior still didn't yet know if he was free from Hodgkin's Lymphoma, but that didn't stop him from competing - just as chemotherapy and radiation and doctor's appointments didn't stop him from training this offseason.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
BEN BAKER never wastes time feeling sorry for himself. Not when an uncommon disease he'd had since childhood caused his liver to fail in 2012, just days shy of his 18th birthday. Not when he was diagnosed, less than two years after a lifesaving liver transplant, with a rare form of post-transplant lymphoma - and not when the cancer reared its ugly head a second time, just when his doctors thought he'd officially beaten it. Baker, 20, didn't even get down last week, after he hit a bump in the road and was lifelined to Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore to be treated for problems with his spleen from all the trauma his young body has taken.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1962, President John F. Kennedy committed the nation to landing a man on the moon by decade's end. In July 1969, it was mission accomplished. A half-century later, invoking Kennedy's challenge, scientists at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center announced they, too, were shooting for the moon. They launched the Cancer Moonshots Program, with the aim of reducing cancer deaths within five to 10 years. "It's a very goal-oriented effort that seems to impact one thing - and that is cancer mortality," Dr. Ronald DePinho, president of MD Anderson, said Saturday at the annual meeting convened by the Philadelphia-based American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
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