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NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
SPORTS
September 5, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Waiting for Marco Dapkey was a promise-filled senior football season. His Neshaminy High coaches had selected him to be one of the squad's captains, he was expected to be a two-way contributor for the Redskins, and recruiting interest was growing. All that changed June 13. Struggling with his breathing the night before and into the morning, a panicked Dapkey woke his mother, Rita. That prompted a short trip to Aria Health Bucks County, where physicians, Rita Dapkey said, thought at first that Marco might have a serious sinus infection, or maybe pneumonia.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As an actor, Forrest Jones' job is to portray dramatic roles with depth and feeling. But his most demanding role has been in real life - a 15-year ordeal with cancer. Jones, whose cancer has been in remission since 1988, will perform tonight in the opening of Hedgerow Theater's two-hour Christmas production, The Medieval English Mystery Plays, a cycle of nine vignettes. "I never really considered dying. I always figured I would be able to beat it and not have it beat me," Jones, 53, said at the George Washington Carver Community Center here, where he leads a youth drama troupe.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Shares of Merck rose Thursday after the drugmaker said its Keytruda immuno-oncology medicine succeeded in a study of patients with advanced lung cancer and showed a survival advantage over patients given standard chemotherapy. Based on the results, an independent data monitoring board recommended that the clinical trial be stopped and that patients receiving chemotherapy be allowed to switch to the company's treatment. Merck, based in Kenilworth, N.J., employs about 9,200 in West Point and Upper Gwynedd in Montgomery County.
SPORTS
June 13, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
Bart Bryant has played some good golf at the Constellation Senior Players Championship, standing in a tie for third after three rounds, but he's doing it with a very heavy heart. Bryant has revealed that his wife, Cathy, is battling brain cancer. "On Mother's Day, they found she had a tumor in her brain," Bryant said in an interview with Golf Channel at the Philadelphia Cricket Club. "They told us it was Stage 4 cleoblastoma, cancer of the brain. " Bryant said his wife underwent surgery "a couple of days" after the diagnosis and will enter H.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston for further treatment this week.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Most women with ovarian cancer get inadequate treatment that cuts their survival short. Experts keep lamenting this well-known problem. This spring, for example, a major report by the Institute of Medicine said that although women who receive care according to national guidelines have "improved survival, less than one-half of women with ovarian cancer receive such care. " What the report didn't say is that, since 2009, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved two sophisticated blood tests that can help women get the optimal surgery for ovarian cancer.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | Gar Joseph
GLIOBLASTOMA is brain cancer. Radiation and chemotherapy fight it. Darren Daulton beat it! Blah, blah, blah. The doctors at Jefferson - oncologists, glioblastomists, radiation shooters - are nothing but sunshine. I am a journalist. Sunshine is boring. "I understand how most patients view a fatal illness," I told my medical group. "But bad news doesn't bother me. In fact, the more detail you give me - bad and worse - the happier I will be. " Happier on the story. Not on my mortality.
SPORTS
June 3, 2016 | By Bill Fleischman, CORRESPONDENT
NORMALLY, when a driver leads 392 of 400 laps, as Martin Truex Jr. did in winning the Coca-Cola 600 last Sunday night at Charlotte, we would stamp a big B on the race, for Bor-ing. Instead, Truex receives a big "attaboy!" for dominating the race and outperforming the multicar teams. While Truex's team is affiliated with Joe Gibbs Racing, it is a single-car operation based in Denver. Truex is part of another, much more personal team. His girlfriend, Sherry Pollex, is a Stage 3 ovarian cancer survivor.
NEWS
May 30, 2016
On May 11, the Cancer Support Community of Greater Philadelphia hosted its 18th annual Evening in the Park fund-raiser. More than 200 attended. The group supports men, women, and children living with cancer by offering free counseling, music therapy, support groups, educational workshops, exercise classes, and specialized programs for children and teens. The event recognized outstanding individuals who have supported the cause, including Iliana Strauss, presented the Inspiration Award; Joseph Robbins, who took home the Courage Award; the Chavez-Theiss family, given the Gilda Radner Award; BP Business Solutions, which received the Community Impact Award; and Corey Langer, oncologist, honored with the Ann Silverman Award.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
The water may now be safe to drink, but concerns persist about the impact of tainted wells near former military bases in Bucks and Montgomery Counties. Officials said Thursday that the Pennsylvania Department of Health would launch a regional cancer study and was considering blood tests for residents near wells in Horsham and Warminster found to have been contaminated by base firefighting foams. The chemicals have been linked to cancer and reproductive issues. "Quite frankly, nobody knows what the long-term effects are at this point," Will Freeman, a legislative specialist with the Department of Health, said at a meeting of local, state, and federal officials led by State Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R., Montgomery)
NEWS
May 23, 2016
ISSUE | BREAST CANCER Stepping up to fight a deadly disease Thank you to the more than 2,000 people who came out last Sunday morning for the 15th annual Living Beyond Breast Cancer Reach and Raise yoga fund-raising event on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Together, 139 teams raised $373,617 to support women and men affected by breast cancer with a trusted source of information and a community of support. This event began as a dream, with a small yoga class of about a hundred people, and it has grown to be one of the city's most spectacular and powerful events.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
One of the biggest challenges for the companies now racing to develop T-cell therapies for cancer is figuring out how to make personalized, living products on an assembly-line scale. Each patient's own T-cells - the soldiers of the immune system - must be siphoned from the blood, coaxed to multiply, genetically engineered to recognize and attack cancer cells, then returned to the patient. Now, Cellectis, a French biotechnology company partnering with Pfizer, says it has used gene-editing technology to achieve a major advance: a "universal" T-cell product, made with healthy donor cells and used "off-the-shelf.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Kim Campbell Thornton, UNIVERSAL UCLICK
EACH WEEK, as Lisa-Maria Padilla trims her cats' nails, she gives them an allover body check to make sure everything looks and feels normal. A little over a year ago, she noticed that her 10-year-old cat Twyla, a blue Abyssinian, had a tiny nodule near one of her nipples. It wasn't painful and Twyla wasn't behaving differently, but Padilla knew something wasn't right. She took Twyla to her veterinarian, who surgically removed the nodule, along with a distal lymph node - from behind a hind leg - and sent them to a pathology lab for analysis.
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