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NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. - The summer's coolest temperatures and a sky as crystalline as Boston's John Hancock Tower, which glimmered on the near horizon, infused Boston College's stony, tony campus with a hint of autumn and football on this August Friday. As if they felt it, too, a family of visitors posed at the Doug Flutie statue outside Alumni Stadium, parents and children wrapped around the sculpted depiction of the Eagles quarterback as he wound up, Juan Marichal-like, to unleash his legendary Hail Mary pass.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
SPORTS
September 5, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Waiting for Marco Dapkey was a promise-filled senior football season. His Neshaminy High coaches had selected him to be one of the squad's captains, he was expected to be a two-way contributor for the Redskins, and recruiting interest was growing. All that changed June 13. Struggling with his breathing the night before and into the morning, a panicked Dapkey woke his mother, Rita. That prompted a short trip to Aria Health Bucks County, where physicians, Rita Dapkey said, thought at first that Marco might have a serious sinus infection, or maybe pneumonia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
To the ever-growing list of things smartphones can put at your fingertips (weather, traffic, games, stock quotes), Apple aims to add "relieve suffering" and "advance science. " Two local researchers who were part of the team that created the company's new breast cancer iPhone application, called Share the Journey, believe that those lofty goals are realistic. Apple enlisted Kathryn Schmitz, an epidemiologist and exercise physiologist at the University of Pennsylvania, and Marisa Weiss, a Lankenau Hospital breast radiation oncologist, who founded and leads the resource website breastcancer.org.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amy Reed, the doctor who has pushed for a ban on the gynecological surgery device that worsened her uterine cancer prognosis, said Wednesday that she is fighting a recurrence. Reed, 41, had about a year in apparent remission after her 2013 diagnosis and treatment for leiomyosarcoma, a rare and ferociously aggressive uterine cancer. Two weeks ago, she had surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania to remove a small tumor that a scan revealed in the bony part of her spinal column.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spit is central to Stephen Swanick's vision for detecting disease. His product, SaliMark OSCC, which debuted this month, uses genetic material in saliva to judge the risk of whether an oral lesion is cancerous. Swanick, 51, left his job in the medical-device industry and spent $1.3 million of his own money to pursue this. He founded PeriRx in Broomall in 2008, hoping spit would help spot a spectrum of illnesses, from lung cancer to diabetes. Instead, it has been a long slog, much like spitting in the wind.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Susan Funck got the horrible news on her 47th birthday - Aug. 27, 2012. Her 13-year-old daughter, Hannah Duffy, had a brain tumor. A biopsy later confirmed that the tumor was malignant. It would be fatal. Funck swore from the beginning that she would tell Hannah the whole truth about her diagnosis. Over the next year, Hannah confronted her mortality, sometimes tearfully. She also scored a winning soccer goal in double overtime two weeks after her biopsy. She laughed and celebrated.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kelly Corrigan loves driving down Darby Paoli Road in Villanova. The author has returned to it many times, both on visits to her parents' house and in her best-selling memoirs about family. It's the look of the landscape. The way the hills slope. The lack of stoplights on the road. "I just think it's beautiful," said Corrigan, 47. It also, like many roads in her life seem to, leads to her mother and father. The Radnor native has built a career writing about her relationships with her parents and daughters.
SPORTS
February 24, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Darren Daulton is cancer-free. The former Phillies catcher, who had been battling brain cancer since June 2013, announced his clean bill of health through social media on Friday. He had his latest checkup and MRI scan earlier in the day. "When the doctor walks in and opens the door and he starts smiling, then everything is cool," Daulton said yesterday of hearing the news for the first time on Friday. Daulton, 53, showed up to Bright House Field yesterday morning to watch his former team work out. "I feel good," he said.
SPORTS
February 24, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Another catcher reported to the Phillies' camp Sunday morning and even though he will be unable to help the rebuilding process on the field, Darren Daulton was still the most welcome sight on these premises since spring training opened Thursday. That's especially true because he came bearing good news at a time when his former team could use it. After visiting his oncologist for an MRI examination in Florida, Daulton tweeted this on Thursday: "I'm incredibly blessed to have a clean scan.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2015 | By Molly Eichel
TELEVISION HOST, producer and part-time Philly resident Marc Summers revealed on WWMR's Preston and Steve Show yesterday morning that he is a cancer survivor. Summers, best known as the host of Nickelodeon's "Double Dare" and the Food Network's "Unwrapped" (which doesn't even touch on the numerous shows on which he's served as producer), told listeners that he was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia five years ago. He was in chemo for two years, yet still went about his daily business, not revealing his diagnosis.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly three years after Emily Whitehead was saved by a revolutionary cancer treatment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the 9-year-old and her parents are being sought after by cancer charities, documentary producers, and families desperate for their own miracle. To take advantage of their unforeseen celebrity and blessings, the Whiteheads on Tuesday unveiled the Emily Whitehead Foundation. It aims to raise money for pediatric cancer research, promote awareness, and help families facing the disease.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
An association of cancer specialists is racing ahead with an ambitious project aimed at improving the quality and efficiency of cancer care by mining patients' electronic health records. The 30,000-member American Society of Clinical Oncology announced a partnership Wednesday with SAP, the global software giant whose U.S. base is in Newtown Square. They are developing CancerLinQ, a computer network intended to help cancer doctors make treatment decisions for their patients based on the results of comparable patients.
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