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SPORTS
September 17, 2008 | by Paul Vigna
A chronological list of the former Steelers who have died since 2000 under age 60. Steve Furness: Feb. 9, 2000, 49, heart attack. Tyrone McGriff: Dec. 9, 2000, 42, heart attack. Joe Gilliam: Dec. 25, 2000, 49, heart attack. Mike Webster: Sept. 24, 2002, 50, heart attack. Ron Shanklin: April 17, 2003, 55, cancer. Fred Small: June 24, 2003, 39, his motorcycle collided with two cars on the Pomona (Calif.) Freeway. James Parrish: March 10, 2004, 35, cancer.
NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As an actor, Forrest Jones' job is to portray dramatic roles with depth and feeling. But his most demanding role has been in real life - a 15-year ordeal with cancer. Jones, whose cancer has been in remission since 1988, will perform tonight in the opening of Hedgerow Theater's two-hour Christmas production, The Medieval English Mystery Plays, a cycle of nine vignettes. "I never really considered dying. I always figured I would be able to beat it and not have it beat me," Jones, 53, said at the George Washington Carver Community Center here, where he leads a youth drama troupe.
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SPORTS
February 3, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
John and Sara Pethokoukis already knew their oldest daughter was tough. Gabby was an athlete, a 6-foot-4 volleyball star on the rise at Villa in the middle of her sophomore year. A middle blocker, she had been named second team all-Big East after the fall 2013 season. The finance major had great friends and teammates, and her boyfriend, Brad Seaton, was an offensive lineman on the football team. Life on the Main Line was simultaneously challenging and wonderful for the Illinois native.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | BY DAN GERINGER, Staff Writer
TERI GILBERT of Northeast Philadelphia is openly defying the Police Department's "no savesies" ban on reserving shoveled-out parking spots in the wake of the weekend blizzard. Gilbert is six months pregnant, so her husband, Mike, who is undergoing radiation treatment for Stage 4 metastatic throat and neck cancer, shoveled out a space in front of their Rhawnhurst house while son Matthew, 23 months, watched from an upstairs window. Then Teri taped a handwritten savesies sign to an orange cone that reads: "This spot was shoveled by a cancer patient for himself and his pregnant wife.
NEWS
January 26, 2016
By Robert Graboyes and Thomas Stossel President Obama has put Vice President Biden in charge of a "moonshot" to cure cancer. Biden recently lost his son Beau to the disease, so his sincerity and passion are assured. And everybody - irrespective of political persuasion - can agree that curing this dread disease is a noble pursuit. Unfortunately, the timeworn moonshot analogy is inappropriate. Curing cancer is not at all like landing on the moon. When President John F. Kennedy articulated his moonshot project in May 1961, it was a narrowly focused, clearly defined engineering problem.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Nearly a week after Vice President Biden visited Philadelphia to announce a new federal "moon shot" to battle cancer, the heads of six leading Pennsylvania cancer centers and other experts gathered in Center City on Thursday to discuss treatment and prevention developments, and sort the promise from the hype. The six directors were panelists at "Cancer Precision Medicine, Big Ideas in Research, Treatment and Prevention," a half-day conference at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.
SPORTS
January 21, 2016 | By Mike Kern, Staff Writer
LIKE A LOT of fair-skinned people, Joe Cassidy knew all about the dangers of getting too much sun. And like a lot of folks as they get older, at some point he figured it might be a good idea to finally see a specialist. Just in case. "My wife (Betty Ann) has always been on me about taking care of myself," said Cassidy, who's been the Rowan basketball coach for the last two decades and a baseball/softball umpire for twice that long. "I had a little blotch on (the left side of) my face that was discolored, about the size of a quarter.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
President Obama's Tuesday night address to Congress was less about the state of the union than the state of the presidency. And the state of this presidency is spent. The signs of intellectual exhaustion were everywhere. Consider just three. After taking credit for success in Syria, raising American stature abroad, and prevailing against the Islamic State - one claim more surreal than the next - Obama was forced to repair to his most well-worn talking point: "If you doubt America's commitment - or mine - to see that justice is done, just ask Osama bin Laden.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Vice President Biden met with scientists at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center Friday afternoon, officially launching his "moonshot" quest to cure cancer. "We're on the cusp of phenomenal breakthroughs," Biden said, adding that President Obama would be issuing an executive order that would get every federal agency involved in the effort. Biden asked the researchers to educate him on the challenges and possibilities of genome-based discoveries of the last several years, particularly a type of immunotherapy that has been pioneered by Penn researcher Carl H. June.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2016
Vice President Biden is scheduled to spend part of Friday afternoon at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center, the first stop on his quest for the United States to cure cancer. President Obama announced the new "Moon Shot" mission during his State of the Union address Tuesday night, comparing it with John F. Kennedy's 1961 declaration to Congress that the nation would land a man on the moon by the end of the decade.Biden's 3 p.m. visit includes a tour of laboratories and a roundtable discussion with researchers at the Smilow Center for Translational Research and the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, both 3400 Civic Center Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
Retired circus elephants may provide the next frontier for research in the fight against cancer. How rare when one good deed leads to potentially two positive outcomes. The first bit of good news was that Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus has decided to end its elephant acts a year and a half early, and will retire its final 11 touring elephants in May. These eleven elephants will join 29 more pachyderms (two additional elephants are at zoos hoping to make more elephants)
BUSINESS
January 13, 2016 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A billionaire medical entrepreneur has pulled together several drugmakers and Philadelphia-based Independence Blue Cross to speed development of what researchers hope could be a powerful weapon against cancers - potent combinations of new drugs that harness the body's immune system. So-called immunotherapies help disease-fighting cells attack tumors. Yet researchers believe they may work best when two, three, or more of the drugs are used together - overwhelming a tumor's cellular defenses with attacks from all sides.
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