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NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. - The summer's coolest temperatures and a sky as crystalline as Boston's John Hancock Tower, which glimmered on the near horizon, infused Boston College's stony, tony campus with a hint of autumn and football on this August Friday. As if they felt it, too, a family of visitors posed at the Doug Flutie statue outside Alumni Stadium, parents and children wrapped around the sculpted depiction of the Eagles quarterback as he wound up, Juan Marichal-like, to unleash his legendary Hail Mary pass.
SPORTS
September 5, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Waiting for Marco Dapkey was a promise-filled senior football season. His Neshaminy High coaches had selected him to be one of the squad's captains, he was expected to be a two-way contributor for the Redskins, and recruiting interest was growing. All that changed June 13. Struggling with his breathing the night before and into the morning, a panicked Dapkey woke his mother, Rita. That prompted a short trip to Aria Health Bucks County, where physicians, Rita Dapkey said, thought at first that Marco might have a serious sinus infection, or maybe pneumonia.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kristine Warner wanted an eye-catching way to encourage men to talk to their doctors about the complicated, controversial subject of prostate cancer screening. Don't Fear The Finger campaign was born. Go ahead and snicker. It got your attention. The finger in question, of course, is the one a physician puts up a man's rectum to feel for cancer in his prostate gland. The rectal exam is usually paired with a PSA blood test. Warner, a graphic designer, former lobbyist, and urologist's daughter, is the volunteer director of the Pennsylvania Prostate Cancer Coalition.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merck & Co. said on Sept. 4 that the Food and Drug Administration approved what Merck said was a groundbreaking cancer treatment that it hopes will cure many patients and generate billions of dollars in revenue. On the same day, Bristol-Myers Squibb said bunk to that, alleging patent infringement in a lawsuit in federal court in Delaware, where both global pharmaceutical giants are registered. Bristol-Myers, whose version of that type of cancer drug was approved in Japan in July, hoped the legal move would thwart Merck in the industry race to sell expensive cancer medicine.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
For the eight years since her diagnosis in 2006, drugs, surgery, and chemotherapy had kept Debra Hinkle's breast cancer at bay. But now, the conventional treatments were failing, and the disease was spreading. So when her oncologist decided it was time for the Bucks County woman to consider relatively untested therapies, she was more than willing. "I thought that if I didn't do a clinical trial now, maybe I wouldn't be able to later," said Hinkle, 54, who lives in Newtown Township and works as a software-development project manager.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Ten years ago, after successful treatment for breast cancer, anxiety became Susan Chase's constant companion. She was unable to sleep, and the unsettled feeling that "the sky was going to fall on me" plagued her daily life. "After all the treatments were done, it felt really horrifying," she says. "I was depressed, fragile, and hypervigilant. " The Mount Airy performer, dancer, and creative arts therapist consulted psychologists and tried a variety of anti-anxiety medications.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a huge boost to the research efforts of drugmaker Merck & Co., the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved a new type of drug that unlocks the body's immune system to attack cancer cells. Merck, which is based in Whitehouse Station, N.J., and employs thousands of people in Montgomery County, had staked much of its future hopes on approval and then sales, which analysts expect will generate billions of dollars a year. The chemical name of the drug is pembrolizumab and its brand name will be Keytruda.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
SIX MONTHS ago Curt Schilling announced he had cancer. Yesterday, he said he's suffering from cancer of the mouth and revealed what he believes is the cause: Chewing tobacco. "I'll go to my grave believing that was why I got what I got," he told WEEI-FM in Boston. "Absolutely. No question in my mind about that . . . I do believe without a doubt, unquestionably, that chewing is what gave me cancer. " Schilling said the cancer is in remission. He has, however, lost 75 pounds because he can't swallow.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he found that he had advanced bile duct cancer and had to stop teaching at Washington Township High School in March 2013, Christopher Lawler set up a scholarship for students there. The college scholarships are for Washington Township seniors "who demonstrated a passion to make a difference for other students," said Douglas R. Venzie, his life partner. "Basically," Venzie said, the awards are meant "to promote the students who understand and create an atmosphere of tolerance and diversity.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many new relationships, this one developed over a cup of coffee. Except this one might lead to a new drug to inhibit the spread of cancer cells. Joseph M. Salvino, a medicinal chemist, and Alessandro Fatatis, a cancer biologist, crossed paths in spring 2010 at a departmental meeting at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Fatatis presented his recent discovery that breast and prostate cancer cells possess a receptor that allows them to infiltrate the bone, often the first site of metastasis for these cancers.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you needed surgery for pancreatic cancer, you probably wouldn't give a thought to what kind of saline solution your surgical team would use. After all, pancreatic cancer is bad news, and the procedure used to excise it, called a Whipple (or the tongue-twisting pancreaticoduodenectomy), is long, dangerous, and technically challenging. But researchers at Thomas Jefferson University say the saline in your IV drip matters. They were able to reduce the complication rate by 25 percent by using saltier saline and using less of it. Their work was published in Annals of Surgery.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vicki Wolf was only 36 when she was first diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. After her third diagnosis 11 years later, the native Philadelphian had a genetic test that revealed what she dreaded and expected: She had inherited a mutation in a gene that made her susceptible to the disease. She urged her brother, Harvey I. Singer, to get genetic testing and counseling, but he shrugged off the idea. "I said, 'I'm a guy.' To me, breast cancer was just something women get," Singer recalled.
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