CollectionsCancer
IN THE NEWS

Cancer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. - The summer's coolest temperatures and a sky as crystalline as Boston's John Hancock Tower, which glimmered on the near horizon, infused Boston College's stony, tony campus with a hint of autumn and football on this August Friday. As if they felt it, too, a family of visitors posed at the Doug Flutie statue outside Alumni Stadium, parents and children wrapped around the sculpted depiction of the Eagles quarterback as he wound up, Juan Marichal-like, to unleash his legendary Hail Mary pass.
SPORTS
September 5, 2010 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Waiting for Marco Dapkey was a promise-filled senior football season. His Neshaminy High coaches had selected him to be one of the squad's captains, he was expected to be a two-way contributor for the Redskins, and recruiting interest was growing. All that changed June 13. Struggling with his breathing the night before and into the morning, a panicked Dapkey woke his mother, Rita. That prompted a short trip to Aria Health Bucks County, where physicians, Rita Dapkey said, thought at first that Marco might have a serious sinus infection, or maybe pneumonia.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 18, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a decade of flat federal funding, the American Association for Cancer Research, a 107-year-old Philadelphia nonprofit, has a new plan: raise more of its own money and boost its profile. "There's an enormous concern that we're losing the best minds in cancer research, and in medical research in general, to other fields, when they could be helping to save more lives from cancer and other diseases," said Margaret Foti, chief executive of AACR. For established cancer researchers, AACR's annual meeting, starting Saturday in Philadelphia and expected to draw 18,500, is a much-anticipated event.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alex Niles, 32, formerly of Yardley, a businessman who created clothing designed to provide comfort for cancer patients during treatment, died Wednesday, April 8, of gastric cancer at his mother's home in the Forest Hills section of New York City. Mr. Niles founded CureWear, a nonprofit that made clothing with a flap so an intravenous line could be hooked up to a medical port without requiring the wearer to undress. His own health crisis inspired Mr. Niles to make treatment "a little more comfortable for the chronically ill," his family said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
  R   ITA WILSON , the actress wife of Tom Hanks , is recovering from a bilateral mastectomy for breast cancer. Rita, 58, had been appearing in Larry David 's play "Fish in the Dark" on Broadway and will return May 5, according to her publicist, Heidi Schaeffer . Wilson, in a statement to People magazine, said yesterday that she is expected to make a full recovery and credited getting a doctor's second opinion after...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rita Wilson has breast cancer Rita Wilson told People on Tuesday that she underwent a double mastectomy and reconstructive surgery last week. "With my husband by my side, and with the love and support of family and friends, I underwent a bilateral mastectomy . . . after a diagnosis of invasive lobular carcinoma," Wilson, 58, said in a statement. "I am recovering and, most importantly, expected to make a full recovery. " Wilson has been married to Tom Hanks since 1988. The actress is on sick leave from her Broadway play Fish in the Dark , in which she costars with Rosie Perez .   Quaid vid: Is it real craziness?
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one would chide a bald chemo patient for making bad decisions about her hair. But a stranger told one of Beth Eaby-Sandy's cancer patients - a woman whose treatment had made her skin turn bright red - that she "really should wear sunscreen. " The patient, who already felt conspicuous, was upset, said Eaby-Sandy, a nurse practitioner who works with lung cancer patients at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The stranger was rude, no doubt, but her ignorance is understandable.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swift says mom is ill Taylor Swift on Thursday shared grave family news: Her mother Andrea Swift has been diagnosed with cancer. Taylor did not specify the type of cancer or prognosis. "I'd like to keep the details of her condition and treatment plans private," the singer, 25, writes on Tumblr. The diagnosis came as a result of Taylor's continued appeals that her doctor-phobic mom get a routine check up. "For Christmas . . . I asked my mom that one of her gifts to me be her going to the doctor," Swift says.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
When researchers talk about the new, mostly experimental form of cancer treatment known as immunotherapy, they often use glowing terms like revolutionary and transformative. Last week's PBS documentary Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies was another example of this. The third and final episode told how many scientists believe that the body's innate defense system is the only weapon adaptable enough to conquer the mutating malignant cells. But harnessing the immune system to launch a self-attack can be highly toxic, even deadly.
SPORTS
March 30, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Cody Brown said it always was a joke with the doctors, nurses, and lab technicians during his battle with a rare form of blood cancer. "They knew," Brown said, "not to touch my left arm. " Brown had plans for that arm and plans for the rest of his baseball career and plans for the rest of his life. He wasn't going to let anaplastic large cell lymphoma - the disease that was diagnosed in October 2013 - stand in his way. "I never allowed myself to think I wasn't going to come back," Brown said.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sweeping chronicle of cancer that premieres this week on PBS has strong Philadelphia connections. Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies is famed documentarian Ken Burns' three-part, six-hour film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning, best-selling book. On Wednesday, the third and final episode prominently features a breakthrough immunotherapy being developed at the University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in partnership with pharmaceutical giant Novartis.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Until she noticed the tiny blood spots on her sheets, Peg Fagan thought the itchy, raised area on her shoulder was a spider bite. So when her doctor asked during a routine checkup in April whether Fagan had any health concerns, she mentioned the bite. The doctor took a sample to biopsy. A few days later, Fagan got a call saying she had to come in to the office. "I said, 'No, I don't,' " remembered Fagan, 56, a breast cancer survivor. "If you are going to tell me that I have cancer, just tell me. " Fagan had melanoma, the most serious kind of skin cancer.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|