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NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. - The summer's coolest temperatures and a sky as crystalline as Boston's John Hancock Tower, which glimmered on the near horizon, infused Boston College's stony, tony campus with a hint of autumn and football on this August Friday. As if they felt it, too, a family of visitors posed at the Doug Flutie statue outside Alumni Stadium, parents and children wrapped around the sculpted depiction of the Eagles quarterback as he wound up, Juan Marichal-like, to unleash his legendary Hail Mary pass.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As an actor, Forrest Jones' job is to portray dramatic roles with depth and feeling. But his most demanding role has been in real life - a 15-year ordeal with cancer. Jones, whose cancer has been in remission since 1988, will perform tonight in the opening of Hedgerow Theater's two-hour Christmas production, The Medieval English Mystery Plays, a cycle of nine vignettes. "I never really considered dying. I always figured I would be able to beat it and not have it beat me," Jones, 53, said at the George Washington Carver Community Center here, where he leads a youth drama troupe.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new prostate cancer studies have found that many low-risk patients have been receiving more treatment than is needed or helpful - racking up millions of dollars in excess health-care costs and, potentially, causing more physical harm than good. One of the studies, both of which were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, showed that among patients whose cancer was not aggressive, those who received hormone therapy as their primary treatment did not live any longer than those who were merely carefully monitored.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
The surgeon delivered the bad news on Elizabeth Koniz's lumpectomy: "We didn't get clean margins. " Stunned, she couldn't think of anything else. "The words rang in my head," said Koniz, a 48-year-old admissions coordinator at Temple University School of Medicine. "I had terrible anxiety. I was nervous at medical appointments. I had tremendous trouble sleeping and cried for weeks after the diagnosis. " About a third of cancer patients experience high levels of anxiety - intense distress, although not typically to the level of post-traumatic stress disorder - after getting the diagnosis or during a difficult moment in treatment.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just seven years from now, pancreatic cancer is projected to become this country's second-leading cancer killer, surpassed only by lung cancer and claiming 48,000 lives a year - nearly the population of Harrisburg. Now No. 4, pancreas cancer will climb in the ranking partly by becoming more common, but mostly because it is ferociously difficult to detect and treat, according to an analysis by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. "The dramatic increase in the anticipated number of deaths . . . is a wake-up call to the research and health-care systems in the United States," senior author Lynn M. Matrisian, a molecular biologist, wrote last month in the journal Cancer Research.
SPORTS
July 10, 2014 | By the Inquirer Staff
Victoria Duval planned on building off her positive Wimbledon experience by playing with the Freedoms in World TeamTennis this summer. That plan has been scrapped now that the 18-year-old player has a bigger battle on her hands. Duval has been diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma and will begin treatment immediately. Duval's representatives at IMG said her cancer was caught at an early stage and that she is expected to recover in a few months. "It is with a heavy heart that I will have to step away from tennis competition for a short period after being diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma," Duval said in a statement.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under a new chief executive, Richard I. Fisher, Fox Chase Cancer Center has slashed $20 million in expenses, including millions it has long spent subsidizing researchers who didn't bring in enough external grant money to fully support their laboratories. As a result of those and cuts in clinical operations, Fox Chase is expected to swing from a projected $17.7 million loss in the fiscal year that ended Monday to a profit of less than $1 million in the coming fiscal year, officials said.
SPORTS
June 30, 2014 | DAILY NEWS STAFF
TEMPLE BASKETBALL will play Duke on Friday, Nov. 21, as part of the Coaches vs. Cancer Classic at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, the Owls announced yesterday. The game is the nightcap of a doubleheader that will open at 7 p.m. with a game between Stanford and UNLV. The next night will feature another doubleheader for the consolation and championship games. All four games will air on truTV. The event is hosted by the Coaches vs. Cancer program, a nationwide collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the National Association of Basketball Coaches and wil benefit the American Cancer Society.
SPORTS
June 27, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Phillies pitcher Curt Schilling announced Wednesday that his cancer is in remission. "As of yesterday I am in remission. Start the 5-year clock!" he wrote on Twitter. Schilling, 47, said in February that he had an undisclosed form of cancer. He underwent at least two surgeries in addition to chemotherapy and radiation treatments. On Facebook he wrote, "To the many, many amazing folks at Dana-Farber [Cancer Institute], [Brigham and Women's Hospital] and [Massachusetts General Hospital]
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2014 | The Inquirer Staff
Joan Lunden fighting cancer Joan Lunden , who hosted ABC's Good Morning America from 1980 to 1997, went on the show Tuesday to say she is fighting breast cancer. This misfortune haunts the show: Cohost Robin Roberts has been treated for it, and so has cohost Amy Robach . Lunden said she had already started chemo and expects to make a full recovery.   Cleese exits Bond movies Monty Python Flying Circus genius John Cleese is out of the James Bond movie series.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Facing a double mastectomy and hysterectomy, Eva Moon eased the anxiety with a limerick: I've just had a genetic test And I'm feeling a little depressed It's not just because I'll have menopause But I wasn't quite done with my breasts Humor isn't touted much in clinical trials or in FDA approvals, but when it comes to cancer, laughter is good medicine, according to Moon. A 58-year-old performing artist from Redmond, Wash., with fiery red hair and a sultry voice, Moon spoke at the Eighth Annual Joining FORCEs Conference in Philadelphia last week.
SPORTS
June 10, 2014 | BY TYLER R. TYNES, Daily News Staff Writer tynest@phillynews.com
FOR AT LEAST one of the 32 teams entered in the winner-take-all Basketball Tournament held at Philadelphia University this weekend, a chance at the $500,000 prize wasn't just for personal needs. For the Fighting Alumni - a team made up of former Notre Dame basketball players, including Germantown Academy grad Ryan Ayers and Penn Charter grad Rob Kurz - it was for a bigger battle. If Ayers, Kurz and company win the cash prize after facing Team Barstool - which includes former NBA players Dahntay Jones, Matt Walsh, Shavlik Randolph and Seton Hall guard Andre Barrett - they will donate some of the money to Coaches vs. Cancer, a charity that Notre Dame coach Mike Brey has made a priority for his players.
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