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NEWS
July 29, 2009
JIM JOHNSON: 1941-2009
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Marshall, the former Minnesota Vikings star who Tuesday revealed his battle with cancer, told a local television station that it is prostate cancer. He initially had requested that the form of cancer remain confidential. Marshall, 62, said he will go to the Mayo Clinic to consider treatment options.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. - The summer's coolest temperatures and a sky as crystalline as Boston's John Hancock Tower, which glimmered on the near horizon, infused Boston College's stony, tony campus with a hint of autumn and football on this August Friday. As if they felt it, too, a family of visitors posed at the Doug Flutie statue outside Alumni Stadium, parents and children wrapped around the sculpted depiction of the Eagles quarterback as he wound up, Juan Marichal-like, to unleash his legendary Hail Mary pass.
NEWS
May 4, 2009
RE THE "Beating Cancer" section: It's not going to happen. There is too much money to be made in the business of cancer. Pharmaceutical companies don't want you to be healthy. If you were, they'd be putting themselves out of business. Cancer, like polio and many other ailments, could be cured next month, but at the expense of closing hospitals, getting rid of doctors, closing so-called research hospitals, etc. Pharmaceutical companies seem to almost cure everything, but in reality they don't cure anything - on purpose.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
Claude Lewis' Op-ed Page column of July 7 on drug users being just plain stupid is one of the most realistic assessments of this horrendous, cancer- like problem that is destroying our youth and our nation from within. The bottom line is that only when we as a nation demand the death penalty for drug pushers on the first offense regardless of age or economic status; and only when our elected leaders get up the guts to heed such demands, and only when drug users are held accountable regardless of their station in life, will this cancer begin to be destroyed.
SPORTS
May 13, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Houston Astros hitting coach Tom McCraw was diagnosed with prostate cancer the team said yesterday, and he will leave the team at the end of its current homestand on Sunday. McCraw, 58, is in his third season with the Astros and has helped Houston to a National League-best .295 team batting average this year. McCraw learned he might have cancer during a physical exam during spring training. A blood test revealed a high prostate-specific antigen level, which can indicate cancer.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Less than six months after he sat stunned as Arnold Palmer revealed he had prostate cancer, two-time Senior PGA Tour Player of the Year Jim Colbert had successful surgery yesterday on his cancerous prostate. Colbert, 56, was operated on at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., said PGA Tour spokesman David Lancer. "Everything went well and the cancer appears to be localized," said Lancer, who spoke with Colbert's office. Lancer said there is no timetable for Colbert's return to competition.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of Phillies slugger Jim Thome died yesterday afternoon. Joyce Thome, 68, died peacefully at home in Peoria, Ill. She had battled cancer for a year. "She was a wonderful woman," Andrea Thome, Jim's wife, said last night. "She was so much more than a mother-in-law. She was a great friend. We sat at so many games over the years and shared so many laughs. I can't tell you how much she'll be missed. " Doctors diagnosed her with lung cancer last winter, but Mrs. Thome made it to the Phillies' home opener in April.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They'll all be traveling to the Poconos this weekend: 65 volunteer counselors, five nurses and a doctor from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and 140 youngsters, age 8 to 18. Some of the kids will be strong and robust. Others will be frail and weak. Some will be bald or missing a limb, or might have a tube in the neck. Eight are blind. They're off for a week of summer camp. What the campers have in common is cancer. Most are in remission. But about 25 percent are still battling for their lives and receiving treatment.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As an actor, Forrest Jones' job is to portray dramatic roles with depth and feeling. But his most demanding role has been in real life - a 15-year ordeal with cancer. Jones, whose cancer has been in remission since 1988, will perform tonight in the opening of Hedgerow Theater's two-hour Christmas production, The Medieval English Mystery Plays, a cycle of nine vignettes. "I never really considered dying. I always figured I would be able to beat it and not have it beat me," Jones, 53, said at the George Washington Carver Community Center here, where he leads a youth drama troupe.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 8, 2014
ISSUE | TAXI SAFETY Ensure it's insured An article on taxi insurance was timely, at least for me ("City cabs light on accident coverage," Nov. 27). Returning from an August medical appointment for knee surgery, I was hit by an All City Taxi cab in Center City. My attorney soon learned that the cabbie's insurance carrier is in liquidation. Perhaps it is wise to ask a taxi driver to show proof of insurance before getting in. |Michael Fill, Philadelphia, poconopadre@aol.com ISSUE | PROTESTS Root causes A recent letter writer asserts that violent protests contradict the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King's principles and thwart racial harmony ("Nonviolent civil rights activist would mourn," Nov. 30)
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tim Lynch has a theory about why he beat the brutal brain cancer glioblastoma. Even with intensive treatment, the average survival is about 15 months. As the tumor grows, it destroys the very abilities that define people as human - thinking, feeling, communicating. Brittany Maynard, who at age 29 became the face of the right-to-die movement, was so determined to cut short the inevitable horror that she ended her life with a lethal prescription this month in Oregon, 10 months after her glioblastoma diagnosis.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday recommended tougher warning labels on electric morcellators used in gynecologic surgery, but opted not to ban the devices, as critics have urged. Power morcellators, introduced in 1993, have motorized blades that can dissect the uterus or uterine fibroids so the tissue can be removed through tiny abdominal incisions. But in some cases - the FDA estimates one in 350 - the device disseminates an undiagnosed cancer that preoperative screening tests cannot reliably detect.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
FOX 29's Iain Page and Lucy Noland , and CBS3's Kathy Orr , cooked up a storm yesterday at the Free Library of Philadelphia's central branch for Cancer Treatment Centers of America's Thanksgiving Throwdown benefit. The trio (along with local cancer survivors Andrew Slachta , Rhonda Ulmer and Laing Meyer ) whipped up meals that could be served with any good turkey dinner, including stuffing with Italian sausage, vegetarian collard greens and sweet potato casserole.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2014
OCTOBER is Breast Cancer Awareness Month - and a call to action to get your annual breast checkup. According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the U.S. About 232,670 cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed this year. Megan Donascimento was happily enjoying life when, last fall, the 46-year-old Mount Airy resident was rocked by the news that she had breast cancer. "I was always adamant about getting mammograms because by mother had breast cancer at 34," said the married mom of two teenagers, a daughter, 18, and a son, 17. Her November 2013 diagnosis was "an aggressive, Stage 2 tumor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Debra Copit, Generosa Grana, and Marisa Weiss have much in common: all mothers, all Main Line residents, all doctors - all breast cancer specialists. And they all have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Their similar stories are both coincidence and cautionary tale - illustrations of breast cancer's indiscriminate nature but also its complexity, storming into the lives of patients with individual and unique markers. Yet at least in one way, cancer has imparted a shared lesson to these women, all of whom are now in excellent health: Getting a diagnosis will change your life.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
BILLY EDWARDS, who spent 15 years entertaining tourists as a costumed Colonial mischief-maker in the city's historic district, has been battling pancreatic cancer since July. So a bunch of his closest friends - including Thomas Jefferson, Betsy Ross and the Phillie Phanatic - will host a "Philly Helps Billy" fundraiser for the 47-year-old tonight at Franklin Square, on Race Street near 6th. The $25 cash-only admission - all of which goes to Edwards for cancer treatments - includes 18-hole Spooky Mini-Golf, carousel rides and refreshments.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While there is much hopeful news these days on the cancer treatment front, a new report finds that many patients are suffering from unmet financial, emotional, and physical needs. Many struggle with serious anxiety, fatigue, and difficulty working, according to the Cancer Support Community report. As they live longer, patients say they need more help coping with long-term side effects. A significant portion have skimped on medical care and many have cut spending on food to save money.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Next month, Thomas G. Frazier will sit down with colleagues at Bryn Mawr Hospital's Comprehensive Breast Center and unseal the results of a blind study for Dune Medical's MarginProbe. The four-month, 30-patient study is the second conducted at Bryn Mawr on the new diagnostic tool designed to help breast cancer surgeons determine - within minutes - whether they have removed all the malignant tissue during a lumpectomy and reduced the need for later surgery. If the second study is positive, the device could become a key tool for breast cancer surgeons at Bryn Mawr and elsewhere.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAR therapy for cancer has moved into the fast lane. The University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia on Thursday published the latest results of their novel "chimeric antigen receptor" - CAR - immune therapy. Of 25 children and five adults with end-stage leukemia, 90 percent saw their cancer disappear and 67 percent were cancer-free six months later. The longest remission has lasted almost three years. The Food and Drug Administration in July gave the CAR therapy "breakthrough" designation, intended to expedite its approval.
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