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Cancer Care

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NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new prostate cancer studies have found that many low-risk patients have been receiving more treatment than is needed or helpful - racking up millions of dollars in excess health-care costs and, potentially, causing more physical harm than good. One of the studies, both of which were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, showed that among patients whose cancer was not aggressive, those who received hormone therapy as their primary treatment did not live any longer than those who were merely carefully monitored.
NEWS
April 26, 2011
ATLANTA - Blacks and other minorities with cancer are more likely than whites to say they would spend everything they have on aggressive treatments that might prolong their lives, a study in the journal Cancer found. Researchers don't know why this is so and didn't ask, but some think it may reflect differences in beliefs about miracles, distrust of doctors among minorities and a misunderstanding of just how ugly and painful end-of-life care can be. About 80 percent of blacks said they were willing to use up all their money to extend their lives, compared with 72 percent of Asians, 69 percent of Hispanics and 54 percent of whites.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1989 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
One result of the increasing competition in the market for health-care services is that hospitals and doctors are trying to make treatment more convenient and appealing for patients. From the offering of valet parking to the provision of improved hospital menus, the word is out: Treat the patient right or risk losing him to a competitor. Now comes the latest example of this trend - outpatient cancer-treatment centers that are open around the clock, offer a comprehensive array of clinical and diagnostic services and even serve snacks to patients.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Janet Knowles and Kimberly Fisher are breast cancer survivors. The importance of effective treatment is a subject they know intimately, and it's what brought them out Tuesday with Gov. Christie and other political and community leaders to mark the formal groundbreaking for the Cooper Cancer Institute in downtown Camden. The two attribute their survival to Cooper and hope that more patients with all types of cancer will get care with the expansion of the institute to Martin Luther King Boulevard and Haddon Avenue, where work is under way. "It's a special day ... long overdue," said Knowles, a Moorestown resident who contributed $5 million in 2006 to fund the Janet Knowles Breast Cancer Center, headquartered at Cooper University Hospital's Voorhees facility.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2007 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials at St. Mary Medical Center said yesterday that they were spending $13.2 million on five new high-tech reasons for Bucks County residents to get cancer care near home instead of in Philadelphia. The Langhorne hospital also has hired a breast surgeon, Andrea Barrio, to replace Beth DuPree, who left St. Mary to become chief executive officer and medical director of the Comprehensive Breast Institute at DSI of Bucks County. Doctors at that for-profit center, which is well-stocked with equipment itself and about a 15-minute drive from St. Mary in Bensalem, focus on breast cancer and cosmetic procedures.
NEWS
January 4, 2005 | By Robert C. Young
This year, Fox Chase Cancer Center physicians will treat more than 6,500 people who have received a cancer diagnosis. Ten years from now, we expect to treat as many as 12,000 new patients a year. If we are to continue offering the best cancer care to an increasing number of patients, we need to expand and grow. To make that possible, Fox Chase has proposed expanding into a portion of Burholme Park, an area that adjoins our campus in Northeast Philadelphia. This plan is the result of a two-year process in which we brought together leading medical experts, scientists and administrators, and asked them to think about what would comprise great medicine and science in the future; what we would need to do to remain one of the nation's finest centers for cancer prevention, research and treatment; and why, how and where we would grow to achieve that vision.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Sam Rennix could be forgiven for assuming that the worst was behind him after triple-bypass surgery in 2010. Then, last summer, his throat became sore, like something was stuck in it. Unlike many men, Rennix, who lives in Springfield, Delaware County, and is manager of Wolfe Pool Supply in Narberth, doesn't hesitate to see a doctor when something's amiss with his health. Perhaps it's because he's married to an intensive-care nurse and knows all too well that procrastinating can turn a curable problem into a death sentence.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Curtis Skinner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patients at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Northeast Philadelphia get chauffeured trips to the hospital, often in a limousine. They were recently treated to a performance by a vintage soul group, the Pointer Sisters, and are regularly welcomed with live piano music, fresh organic fare in the cafeteria, and receptionists befitting a classy hotel. These perks are part of the for-profit hospital's strategy to keep patients happy and avoid government penalties. In fact, the center enjoys patient satisfaction numbers among the best of any hospital in the region.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1988 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Fox Chase Cancer Center yesterday announced joint venture programs to extend sophisticated cancer care to patients of two suburban community hospitals. Fox Chase Cancer Center, on Burholme Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia, one of only 20 government-designated comprehensive cancer care centers in the nation, will work with Montgomery Hospital in Norristown and North Penn Hospital in Lansdale. "Most patients, 80 to 80 percent of cancer patients, seek cancer treatment at community hospitals near their homes, not academic or cancer center hospitals," said Thomas J. Keane, executive director of the Fox Chase Network, a subsidiary of Fox Chase Cancer Center.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2004 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cancer Treatment Centers of America said yesterday that it bought Parkview Hospital from Tenet Healthcare Corp. and planned to convert the site into a 40-bed specialty hospital. The Arlington Heights, Ill., company said it would spend $44 million over the next year to transform the former 200-bed general hospital that Tenet closed a year ago into its fourth cancer treatment center. "The new hospital facility will create multiple employment and economic opportunities that will infuse a minimum of $6 million into the local economy in the first year alone," said Robert Mayo, vice chairman of Cancer Treatment Centers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Sam Rennix could be forgiven for assuming that the worst was behind him after triple-bypass surgery in 2010. Then, last summer, his throat became sore, like something was stuck in it. Unlike many men, Rennix, who lives in Springfield, Delaware County, and is manager of Wolfe Pool Supply in Narberth, doesn't hesitate to see a doctor when something's amiss with his health. Perhaps it's because he's married to an intensive-care nurse and knows all too well that procrastinating can turn a curable problem into a death sentence.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new prostate cancer studies have found that many low-risk patients have been receiving more treatment than is needed or helpful - racking up millions of dollars in excess health-care costs and, potentially, causing more physical harm than good. One of the studies, both of which were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, showed that among patients whose cancer was not aggressive, those who received hormone therapy as their primary treatment did not live any longer than those who were merely carefully monitored.
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Every morning, I take a One-a-Day women's multivitamin. The label advertises how the pill is "formulated to support" everything from bone strength to heart health. Taking the pill always makes me feel proactive about my health. I never doubted the common view that "vitamins are good for you. " In Do You Believe in Magic?: The Sense and Nonsense of Alternative Medicine , Paul A. Offit, chief of the division of infectious diseases at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, delivers an epic critique of vitamins, the supplement industry, and our vulnerability to quackery.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
Being just a kid himself, 7-year-old Sam Hornikel isn't concerned about his ability to have children of his own yet. He's thinking more about the soccer game he missed, or his math homework. But researchers around the world are working to give boys like Sam - who fought off cancer when he was only 3 years old - the opportunity to have their own family one day. Often, chemotherapy or radiation treatments can harm fertility. Typically, older patients can bank sperm, but for those who haven't gone through puberty yet, researchers are deep-freezing tiny pieces of their testicular tissue.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Curtis Skinner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patients at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Northeast Philadelphia get chauffeured trips to the hospital, often in a limousine. They were recently treated to a performance by a vintage soul group, the Pointer Sisters, and are regularly welcomed with live piano music, fresh organic fare in the cafeteria, and receptionists befitting a classy hotel. These perks are part of the for-profit hospital's strategy to keep patients happy and avoid government penalties. In fact, the center enjoys patient satisfaction numbers among the best of any hospital in the region.
NEWS
June 16, 2013
Christopher Fifis, Nick Fifis, and John Fifis are the owners of Ponzio's Diner & Bakery Bar in Cherry Hill Growing up as sons of a first-generation Greek immigrant, we learned early about the value of hard work and family. As the owner of Ponzio's Diner in Cherry Hill, our dad spent almost every day for more than two decades greeting guests and entertaining them with his dry wit and sense of humor. We had dinner at the diner almost every night because our dad was always working, and when we were old enough, he put us to work there, too. On the rare occasion that our dad did take time off for a family vacation, we all piled into the car to head to Wildwood for a week, with Greek music turned up as loud as we could stand.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
A new genetic test to gauge the aggressiveness of prostate cancer may help tens of thousands of men each year decide whether they need to treat their cancer right away or can safely monitor it. The new test, which goes on sale Wednesday, joins another one that recently came on the market. Both analyze multiple genes in a biopsy sample and give a score for aggressiveness, similar to tests used now for certain breast and colon cancers. Doctors say tests like these have the potential to curb a major problem in cancer care - overtreatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nora Situm, the 5-year-old Croatian child seeking an experimental leukemia therapy at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, has overcome the first obstacle to qualifying for the treatment. Doctors have collected a big enough supply of her T cells, the immune cells that form the basis of the therapy, said Richard Aplenc, Nora's oncologist. The update came in a video statement released Friday by the hospital and Nora's parents - her mother, Giana Atanasovska, and father, Ivica Situm.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Embracing the promise of personalized medicine, Fox Chase Cancer Center is offering a high-tech DNA test that can identify the genetic mutations driving an individual patient's cancer. Other leading medical centers and biotech firms are launching similar tests, which should help doctors make cancer care more effective and less toxic. Experts say this customized approach will become increasingly important as the arsenal of drugs that target cancer genes grows. For patients at the forefront, however, the value of cutting-edge DNA testing is hard to predict.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
In a sign of how far the science of cancer genomics has come, the University of Pennsylvania Health System will do genetic tests later this year on cancer cells of all patients with several types of cancer. Penn will test up to 48 genes in patients with melanoma, acute myelogenous leukemia, and brain and lung cancer, said Chi V. Dang, director of the Abramson Cancer Center. The results will reveal which patients could benefit from new drugs that work only for those with certain mutations.
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