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Cancer Care

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NEWS
April 26, 2011
ATLANTA - Blacks and other minorities with cancer are more likely than whites to say they would spend everything they have on aggressive treatments that might prolong their lives, a study in the journal Cancer found. Researchers don't know why this is so and didn't ask, but some think it may reflect differences in beliefs about miracles, distrust of doctors among minorities and a misunderstanding of just how ugly and painful end-of-life care can be. About 80 percent of blacks said they were willing to use up all their money to extend their lives, compared with 72 percent of Asians, 69 percent of Hispanics and 54 percent of whites.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1989 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
One result of the increasing competition in the market for health-care services is that hospitals and doctors are trying to make treatment more convenient and appealing for patients. From the offering of valet parking to the provision of improved hospital menus, the word is out: Treat the patient right or risk losing him to a competitor. Now comes the latest example of this trend - outpatient cancer-treatment centers that are open around the clock, offer a comprehensive array of clinical and diagnostic services and even serve snacks to patients.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new prostate cancer studies have found that many low-risk patients have been receiving more treatment than is needed or helpful - racking up millions of dollars in excess health-care costs and, potentially, causing more physical harm than good. One of the studies, both of which were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, showed that among patients whose cancer was not aggressive, those who received hormone therapy as their primary treatment did not live any longer than those who were merely carefully monitored.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
An association of cancer specialists is racing ahead with an ambitious project aimed at improving the quality and efficiency of cancer care by mining patients' electronic health records. The 30,000-member American Society of Clinical Oncology announced a partnership Wednesday with SAP, the global software giant whose U.S. base is in Newtown Square. They are developing CancerLinQ, a computer network intended to help cancer doctors make treatment decisions for their patients based on the results of comparable patients.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Janet Knowles and Kimberly Fisher are breast cancer survivors. The importance of effective treatment is a subject they know intimately, and it's what brought them out Tuesday with Gov. Christie and other political and community leaders to mark the formal groundbreaking for the Cooper Cancer Institute in downtown Camden. The two attribute their survival to Cooper and hope that more patients with all types of cancer will get care with the expansion of the institute to Martin Luther King Boulevard and Haddon Avenue, where work is under way. "It's a special day ... long overdue," said Knowles, a Moorestown resident who contributed $5 million in 2006 to fund the Janet Knowles Breast Cancer Center, headquartered at Cooper University Hospital's Voorhees facility.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2007 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials at St. Mary Medical Center said yesterday that they were spending $13.2 million on five new high-tech reasons for Bucks County residents to get cancer care near home instead of in Philadelphia. The Langhorne hospital also has hired a breast surgeon, Andrea Barrio, to replace Beth DuPree, who left St. Mary to become chief executive officer and medical director of the Comprehensive Breast Institute at DSI of Bucks County. Doctors at that for-profit center, which is well-stocked with equipment itself and about a 15-minute drive from St. Mary in Bensalem, focus on breast cancer and cosmetic procedures.
NEWS
January 4, 2005 | By Robert C. Young
This year, Fox Chase Cancer Center physicians will treat more than 6,500 people who have received a cancer diagnosis. Ten years from now, we expect to treat as many as 12,000 new patients a year. If we are to continue offering the best cancer care to an increasing number of patients, we need to expand and grow. To make that possible, Fox Chase has proposed expanding into a portion of Burholme Park, an area that adjoins our campus in Northeast Philadelphia. This plan is the result of a two-year process in which we brought together leading medical experts, scientists and administrators, and asked them to think about what would comprise great medicine and science in the future; what we would need to do to remain one of the nation's finest centers for cancer prevention, research and treatment; and why, how and where we would grow to achieve that vision.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one would chide a bald chemo patient for making bad decisions about her hair. But a stranger told one of Beth Eaby-Sandy's cancer patients - a woman whose treatment had made her skin turn bright red - that she "really should wear sunscreen. " The patient, who already felt conspicuous, was upset, said Eaby-Sandy, a nurse practitioner who works with lung cancer patients at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The stranger was rude, no doubt, but her ignorance is understandable.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It is called Sacred Heart Home, and its work is just that: sacred. For 84 years, a group of nuns has been caring for poor people dying from cancer in their gleaming home on the edge of Hunting Park. They do it free of charge. The Dominican Sisters of Hawthorne accept no payment of any kind from patients, insurance companies, or the government. Though its sisters are Roman Catholic, Sacred Heart receives no funding stream from any diocese or church.   "Isn't that a miracle?"
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2015
ISSUE | EARLY LEARNING Smart move We applaud Mayor Nutter and the leadership at Shared Prosperity Philadelphia for developing a plan to reduce poverty in the city based on helping all children capitalize on their potential ("Nutter, Kenney trumpet new push for early-childhood learning," June 3). We know what works. Abundant research has found that the preschool years are a critical time for brain development. Early learning efforts that focus not only on skill acquisition, but also on helping children develop positive beliefs about their own potential to succeed, have the power to change the trajectory of their lives.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one would chide a bald chemo patient for making bad decisions about her hair. But a stranger told one of Beth Eaby-Sandy's cancer patients - a woman whose treatment had made her skin turn bright red - that she "really should wear sunscreen. " The patient, who already felt conspicuous, was upset, said Eaby-Sandy, a nurse practitioner who works with lung cancer patients at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The stranger was rude, no doubt, but her ignorance is understandable.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
An association of cancer specialists is racing ahead with an ambitious project aimed at improving the quality and efficiency of cancer care by mining patients' electronic health records. The 30,000-member American Society of Clinical Oncology announced a partnership Wednesday with SAP, the global software giant whose U.S. base is in Newtown Square. They are developing CancerLinQ, a computer network intended to help cancer doctors make treatment decisions for their patients based on the results of comparable patients.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It is called Sacred Heart Home, and its work is just that: sacred. For 84 years, a group of nuns has been caring for poor people dying from cancer in their gleaming home on the edge of Hunting Park. They do it free of charge. The Dominican Sisters of Hawthorne accept no payment of any kind from patients, insurance companies, or the government. Though its sisters are Roman Catholic, Sacred Heart receives no funding stream from any diocese or church.   "Isn't that a miracle?"
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the nearly 41/2 years of Nancy Carolan's battle with acute myeloid leukemia, her oncologist had pulled her from the brink several times. Strong-willed and brave, Carolan had endured infections, brutal rounds of chemotherapy, and a bone-marrow transplant. She was an optimist who wanted to believe she could beat the blood cancer. By August, though, her sisters could see that Carolan, 63, had lost the fight. She was hospitalized, very sick and still receiving aggressive care.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the staff at Abington Memorial Hospital handed the breast cancer patient its new "Distress Thermometer" questionnaire, she instantly felt conflicted. How could she, an early-stage patient with a good prognosis, say how she was really feeling when she saw how much worse off others in the radiation-treatment waiting room were? She left it blank. A week later, the staff asked again. Come January, cancer programs that want accreditation from the American College of Surgeons' Commission on Cancer will be required to formally ask all cancer patients about their psychosocial needs.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While there is much hopeful news these days on the cancer treatment front, a new report finds that many patients are suffering from unmet financial, emotional, and physical needs. Many struggle with serious anxiety, fatigue, and difficulty working, according to the Cancer Support Community report. As they live longer, patients say they need more help coping with long-term side effects. A significant portion have skimped on medical care and many have cut spending on food to save money.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Sam Rennix could be forgiven for assuming that the worst was behind him after triple-bypass surgery in 2010. Then, last summer, his throat became sore, like something was stuck in it. Unlike many men, Rennix, who lives in Springfield, Delaware County, and is manager of Wolfe Pool Supply in Narberth, doesn't hesitate to see a doctor when something's amiss with his health. Perhaps it's because he's married to an intensive-care nurse and knows all too well that procrastinating can turn a curable problem into a death sentence.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new prostate cancer studies have found that many low-risk patients have been receiving more treatment than is needed or helpful - racking up millions of dollars in excess health-care costs and, potentially, causing more physical harm than good. One of the studies, both of which were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, showed that among patients whose cancer was not aggressive, those who received hormone therapy as their primary treatment did not live any longer than those who were merely carefully monitored.
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