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Cancer Care

ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Embracing the promise of personalized medicine, Fox Chase Cancer Center is offering a high-tech DNA test that can identify the genetic mutations driving an individual patient's cancer. Other leading medical centers and biotech firms are launching similar tests, which should help doctors make cancer care more effective and less toxic. Experts say this customized approach will become increasingly important as the arsenal of drugs that target cancer genes grows. For patients at the forefront, however, the value of cutting-edge DNA testing is hard to predict.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fox Chase Cancer Center will become part of the Temple University Health System, officials announced Thursday. The combination, which is expected to close next summer, will join two prominent Philadelphia health-care institutions, both of which have faced fiscal difficulties lately. Temple, based in North Philadelphia, will get a nationally recognized research partner that could help it compete with other academic medical centers in the region. Fox Chase, which will keep its name, will get a bigger referral base for patients, room to expand at Temple's Jeanes Hospital next door, and a chance to save money as health-care reform further squeezes the dollars available for clinical care and research.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Revenue growth at area health systems was uneven in the fiscal year ended June 30, with the biggest systems showing strong gains while smaller competitors scraped out, at best, meager increases. Revenues from patients at Holy Redeemer Health System in Meadowbrook, for example, have been nearly flat since 2009. They were $336 million in the year ended June 30. That was $2 million more than in 2009 and $3.5 million less than in 2011. At Montgomery County neighbor Abington Health, patient revenues have been stuck at about $760 million for three years in a row, reflecting a widespread challenge that hospital executives attribute to changing medical-treatment methods and the weak economy.
NEWS
February 3, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Between May 2006 and March 2007, Cheryl Bayard's life was all about fighting her breast cancer. There was surgery, radiation and chemotherapy to endure. She saw doctors and nurses constantly. Then it was over. Except that it wasn't. "All of a sudden, they say, 'That's it,' " said Bayard, a retired art teacher who lives near Tylersport in Montgomery County. "You're left with, Now what?" Bayard was on her own to piece together information about her future medical needs from fellow survivors, guest speakers at support groups and her doctors.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO - New research casts doubt on a popular treatment for breast cancer: a week of radiation to part of the breast instead of longer treatment to all of it. Women who were given partial radiation were twice as likely to need their breasts removed later because the cancer came back, doctors found. The treatment uses radioactive pellets briefly placed in the breast instead of radiation beamed from a machine. At least 13 percent of older patients in the United States get this now, and it is popular with working women.
NEWS
December 27, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many cancer patients, the main obstacle to getting treatment in Philadelphia is not health insurance, side effects, or lack of therapies. "Twenty percent of appointments are canceled because patients can't get there," said Gerald Furgione. As executive director of Phillycarshare, Furgione has figured out a way to help: Enlist volunteers to drive cancer patients to treatment in car-share vehicles, at no cost to the drivers or riders. The Phillypatientride program, believed to be unique in the United States, will hit the road Jan. 4. Reduced car-share fees will be covered by the American Cancer Society, Hahnemann University Hospital, and Temple University Hospital.
NEWS
February 17, 1993 | By Marjorie Valbrun, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new program that will combine various cancer treatment programs, coordinate all aspects of care for cancer patients and bring together a host of medical experts, was unveiled yesterday as the new Cancer Center of Southern New Jersey at Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center. The program, referred to as a "cancer center without walls," will provide cancer patients with expanded care. Hospital administrators call it a "one-stop-shopping" approach to cancer treatment, the only one of its kind it in South Jersey, they said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nora Situm, the 5-year-old Croatian child seeking an experimental leukemia therapy at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, has overcome the first obstacle to qualifying for the treatment. Doctors have collected a big enough supply of her T cells, the immune cells that form the basis of the therapy, said Richard Aplenc, Nora's oncologist. The update came in a video statement released Friday by the hospital and Nora's parents - her mother, Giana Atanasovska, and father, Ivica Situm.
NEWS
November 12, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rep. John Adler (D., N.J.) announced yesterday that he hopes to require the Department of Veterans Affairs to report to Congress the quality of all the small programs in its hospitals and other medical facilities. The goal is to prevent a repeat of problems that plagued prostate cancer care at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center as well as programs at other VA hospitals. Adler's legislation focuses on three areas: small programs, where medical errors and poor care are most likely to avoid detection; radiation safety; and contracts with private doctors and hospitals.
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