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Cancer Care

ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nora Situm, the 5-year-old Croatian child seeking an experimental leukemia therapy at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, has overcome the first obstacle to qualifying for the treatment. Doctors have collected a big enough supply of her T cells, the immune cells that form the basis of the therapy, said Richard Aplenc, Nora's oncologist. The update came in a video statement released Friday by the hospital and Nora's parents - her mother, Giana Atanasovska, and father, Ivica Situm.
NEWS
November 12, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rep. John Adler (D., N.J.) announced yesterday that he hopes to require the Department of Veterans Affairs to report to Congress the quality of all the small programs in its hospitals and other medical facilities. The goal is to prevent a repeat of problems that plagued prostate cancer care at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center as well as programs at other VA hospitals. Adler's legislation focuses on three areas: small programs, where medical errors and poor care are most likely to avoid detection; radiation safety; and contracts with private doctors and hospitals.
NEWS
July 22, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Top radiation oncology officials from the University of Pennsylvania will testify at a congressional hearing today on the troubled prostate cancer program at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center. Penn doctors, medical physicists, and radiation technicians performed the substandard treatments at the VA hospital, where dozens of tiny radioactive seeds were implanted to destroy cancer cells. Steven M. Hahn, chair of radiation oncology at Penn and the health system's top medical physicist, will face questions about how the problems in the VA's brachytherapy program were able to persist for so long.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, several of Lindy Snider's friends and family members were battling cancer, undergoing chemotherapy and radiation, and lamenting what the treatment was doing to their skin. She remembers asking her good friend, the singer-songwriter Lauren Hart, who was being treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2000, "Why don't you ask your doctor for some cream?" Hart's answer was, "Well, there's nothing," Snider recalls. Perplexed that big pharmaceutical and cosmetics firms did not have a line of products geared to cancer patients, Snider, 46, began searching for information, and spoke to doctors and dermatologists.
LIVING
June 28, 1999 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The American Cancer Society and a national alliance of cancer centers have issued prostate-cancer treatment guidelines that translate technical medical information into concise, understandable advice for patients. The 50-page report is the second in a series of patient guidelines for the top 10 cancers. The guidelines are being made available through toll-free numbers and the Internet. The Cancer Society's partner in the project is the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN)
NEWS
June 21, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A failure of oversight and systemic problems in prostate-cancer care at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center caused 92 veterans to receive incorrect doses of radiation to treat their condition, triggering a federal investigation of the hospital's protocols. Most of the vets got significantly less than the prescribed dose from brachytherapy - the use of implanted radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. Other patients received excessive radiation to nearby tissue and organs. Nearly all of the brachytherapy cases with incorrect doses were performed by a University of Pennsylvania doctor under contract to the VA. That radiation oncologist, Gary Kao, has not seen patients since the problem was discovered last year, said a Penn official.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | For The Inquirer / TOM MIHALEK
The tug of war was trench warfare for Dennis Hubal and his squad from Caesars Atlantic City Hotel-Casino yesterday as they battled during the annual Casinolympics fund-raising marathon. Teams of casino employees compete in a variety of contests on the Atlantic City beach and Boardwalk to benefit the Shore Memorial Hospital's Cancer Care Center. The Casinolympics has raised $112,000 since 1982.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania has relatively high cancer rates, many rural counties with no cancer specialists, rising cancer care costs, and shrinking reimbursements. "We face a perfect storm of challenges," said Marilyn Heine, a hematologist-oncologist with a group practice in Langhorne. Heine, a past president of the Pennsylvania Society of Oncology and Hematology, joined several colleagues this week in discussing two new reports on cancer - one national and the other focused on the Keystone State.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | BY VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY Health System and the Fox Chase Cancer Center made their impending marriage official yesterday. The two institutions signed an agreement that would make the cancer center part of Temple's health system in a cooperative relationship expected to help both organizations, which have had recent financial difficulties. Fox Chase will expand its outpatient and surgical-care services in its own Northeast Philadelphia facility and in leased space at the adjacent Jeanes Hospital, a Temple affiliate since 1996.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
With surgery and chemotherapy, Roberta Bash, 67, of Downingtown beat advanced-stage ovarian cancer in 2010. Then, it came back. "Cancer can go dormant, and I didn't know that," she said. The second time, Bash wanted to explore all her options - including an experimental treatment at Penn Medicine that manipulates a patient's tumor cells to trigger an immune response. So, during her surgery last March, instead of allowing her tumor to be tossed out or donated for research, she saved it. The company StoreMyTumor, which markets itself as a concierge service for tumors, negotiated the tissue's harvest, processing, and cryopreservation.
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