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Cancer Care

BUSINESS
October 4, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Revenue growth at area health systems was uneven in the fiscal year ended June 30, with the biggest systems showing strong gains while smaller competitors scraped out, at best, meager increases. Revenues from patients at Holy Redeemer Health System in Meadowbrook, for example, have been nearly flat since 2009. They were $336 million in the year ended June 30. That was $2 million more than in 2009 and $3.5 million less than in 2011. At Montgomery County neighbor Abington Health, patient revenues have been stuck at about $760 million for three years in a row, reflecting a widespread challenge that hospital executives attribute to changing medical-treatment methods and the weak economy.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Janet Knowles and Kimberly Fisher are breast cancer survivors. The importance of effective treatment is a subject they know intimately, and it's what brought them out Tuesday with Gov. Christie and other political and community leaders to mark the formal groundbreaking for the Cooper Cancer Institute in downtown Camden. The two attribute their survival to Cooper and hope that more patients with all types of cancer will get care with the expansion of the institute to Martin Luther King Boulevard and Haddon Avenue, where work is under way. "It's a special day ... long overdue," said Knowles, a Moorestown resident who contributed $5 million in 2006 to fund the Janet Knowles Breast Cancer Center, headquartered at Cooper University Hospital's Voorhees facility.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fox Chase Cancer Center will become part of the Temple University Health System, officials announced Thursday. The combination, which is expected to close next summer, will join two prominent Philadelphia health-care institutions, both of which have faced fiscal difficulties lately. Temple, based in North Philadelphia, will get a nationally recognized research partner that could help it compete with other academic medical centers in the region. Fox Chase, which will keep its name, will get a bigger referral base for patients, room to expand at Temple's Jeanes Hospital next door, and a chance to save money as health-care reform further squeezes the dollars available for clinical care and research.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO - New research casts doubt on a popular treatment for breast cancer: a week of radiation to part of the breast instead of longer treatment to all of it. Women who were given partial radiation were twice as likely to need their breasts removed later because the cancer came back, doctors found. The treatment uses radioactive pellets briefly placed in the breast instead of radiation beamed from a machine. At least 13 percent of older patients in the United States get this now, and it is popular with working women.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
BEFORE SHE got sick, Hannah Max was many things: stellar math and biology student, passionate horse rider, lover of sushi. Since her diagnosis with Stage IV, high-risk neuroblastoma - a rare and deadly childhood cancer that attacks the nervous system - the 13-year-old is now a medical trailblazer, too. And you, Daily News readers, are partially responsible for that. So thank you for what you've done, not just for Hannah but for other children in desperate need of cancer care in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 20, 2011
In a move that could one day help cancer patients mine their own DNA for new treatment options, Fox Chase Cancer Center last week announced it was striking a partnership with the California-based biotechnology giant Life Technologies Corp. The plan is to map the genes of patients' tumors so doctors can devise precise treatments. Fighting cancer remains fiendishly complex. "At a genetic level, any given tumor type is different in different individuals," says Jeff Boyd, senior vice president for molecular medicine at Fox Chase.
NEWS
April 26, 2011
ATLANTA - Blacks and other minorities with cancer are more likely than whites to say they would spend everything they have on aggressive treatments that might prolong their lives, a study in the journal Cancer found. Researchers don't know why this is so and didn't ask, but some think it may reflect differences in beliefs about miracles, distrust of doctors among minorities and a misunderstanding of just how ugly and painful end-of-life care can be. About 80 percent of blacks said they were willing to use up all their money to extend their lives, compared with 72 percent of Asians, 69 percent of Hispanics and 54 percent of whites.
NEWS
December 27, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many cancer patients, the main obstacle to getting treatment in Philadelphia is not health insurance, side effects, or lack of therapies. "Twenty percent of appointments are canceled because patients can't get there," said Gerald Furgione. As executive director of Phillycarshare, Furgione has figured out a way to help: Enlist volunteers to drive cancer patients to treatment in car-share vehicles, at no cost to the drivers or riders. The Phillypatientride program, believed to be unique in the United States, will hit the road Jan. 4. Reduced car-share fees will be covered by the American Cancer Society, Hahnemann University Hospital, and Temple University Hospital.
NEWS
November 12, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rep. John Adler (D., N.J.) announced yesterday that he hopes to require the Department of Veterans Affairs to report to Congress the quality of all the small programs in its hospitals and other medical facilities. The goal is to prevent a repeat of problems that plagued prostate cancer care at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center as well as programs at other VA hospitals. Adler's legislation focuses on three areas: small programs, where medical errors and poor care are most likely to avoid detection; radiation safety; and contracts with private doctors and hospitals.
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