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Cancer Cluster

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NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
At the chemical plant in Toms River, nylon stockings would melt on the legs of secretaries sent on errands to production buildings. Noxious, colored smoke rose from the plant's stacks. Its effluent tinted the river, and fish caught there had a strange taste. At a nearby kids' swimming hole, a guy who took a dip came out with purplish foam clinging to his body. So when the children of Toms River began to be diagnosed with cancer - so many that one hospital doctor commented, "Another one from Toms River" - it was the plant's fault, right?
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists would receive $5.5 million to study a first-of-its-kind cancer cluster in Northeastern Pennsylvania under a provision inserted by Sen. Arlen Specter in the federal spending bill moving through Congress. The cluster is potentially linked to environmental hazards. Under the $410 billion federal spending bill moving through Congress, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would receive $5 million to study cases of polycythemia vera (PV), a rare blood cancer that turned up in unusually high numbers in an area 80 miles northwest of Philadelphia, said Specter (R., Pa.)
NEWS
December 22, 1998 | by Rob Laymon, For the Daily News
The afternoon sun throws a pretty light across the properties on Union Landing Road in East Riverton. But the scene is far from pastoral. Residents in this corner of Cinnaminson Township have made their voices heard about a possible cancer cluster in their neighborhood. Years of industrialization on this land by the Delaware River has left a legacy of cancer, they say. Union Landing Road borders the Cinnaminson Landfill, otherwise known as the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site, a Superfund site.
NEWS
February 10, 2002
Thanks to Toms River, the phrase "cancer cluster" has taken on an ominous reality in our area. Between 1979 and 1995 in Dover Township, the Ocean County municipality that includes Toms River, 90 children were found to have various types of cancer. Statisticians estimated that this population could be expected to have had 67 cases. Since the original cases, 28 more children there have been found to have cancer, according to their families. Sixteen of the 118 children have died. Families of affected children felt Toms River was a cancer cluster - an excess of a particular cancer at one time and place in a sharply defined population.
NEWS
March 13, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Roseann Hurley's daughter Sarah was diagnosed with leukemia at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia last summer, one doctor turned to another and grimaced, "Not another one from Toms River. " "It was scary," the 34-year-old mother of five recalled. "The staff had a list of names of patients from Toms River. " A Newark Star-Ledger report over the weekend contending that a "cancer cluster" had been detected in Ocean County came as no surprise to some residents. "We've been asking for a study into this for years," said Linda Gillick, executive director of Ocean of Love for Children with Cancer, a nonprofit support group in the county.
NEWS
October 14, 2006 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Health told officials in Mount Laurel yesterday that the Countryside Farms residential development is not a cancer cluster. While residents in the 274-home community reported about two dozen cases of cancer as well as gastrointestinal or neurological diseases in 11 homes along Schoolhouse Lane by current or former residents, the state focused on the occurrences of cancer. It determined that the cancer rates at Countryside were 25 percent lower than in the rest of the state, said Eddy Bresnitz, department commissioner and epidemiologist.
NEWS
December 17, 2001 | Daily News staff and wire reports
Cops celebrate holiday with special needs kids Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 28 will hold its annual holiday party for special needs children at noon today in the Hilton Hotel in Cherry Hill. More than 900 children were expected to attend the event, sponsored by the hotel, Cherry Hill Shoprite Supermarket, Springdale Deli, the Riversharks baseball team and philanthropist Kal Rudman. Among those on hand will be Eagles cheerleaders, Cherry Hill Police Chief Brian Malloy, Camden County Prosecutor Lee A. Solomon and, of course, Santa Claus.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | By Linda Seida, Special to The Inquirer
After four years of near-constant worry and seesawing emotions, Joan Conklin, 32, has probably earned the right to sit back and let somebody else do the worrying for a change. She and her husband, Pete, 34, have fought long and hard to help their 7- year-old son, Ryan, overcome leukemia. The four-year battle often affected their other three boys and disrupted their home life, which came to revolve around Ryan's chemotherapy and, this year, his bone-marrow transplant. Now that the transplant, for which Ryan's brother Casey, 6, was the donor, is an apparent success, no one could blame the Croydon family for sitting back, giving thanks and collectively heaving a long-deserved sigh of relief.
NEWS
November 17, 2006 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nothing was found in the soil and water of Pennsauken Creek that might have caused residents of a Mount Laurel neighborhood to be stricken with cancer and other diseases over the last three decades, preliminary test results show. The samples were taken from the south branch of the creek behind Countryside Lane in the Countryside Farms neighborhood. "Everything back there is clean," Mayor Pete McCaffrey said yesterday. "We are doing some additional testing in other areas just to be 100 percent sure.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Soil tests and a door-to-door survey may help health officials determine whether a cancer "cluster" exists in the Venice Park section of the city, where residents say as many as 30 people have died from various forms of the disease in the last five years. U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg met with about 50 residents yesterday in a community center to hear heartbreaking stories of personal loss and to assure residents that federal and local authorities would investigate to see whether the cancers could be linked to a common cause.
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NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
At the chemical plant in Toms River, nylon stockings would melt on the legs of secretaries sent on errands to production buildings. Noxious, colored smoke rose from the plant's stacks. Its effluent tinted the river, and fish caught there had a strange taste. At a nearby kids' swimming hole, a guy who took a dip came out with purplish foam clinging to his body. So when the children of Toms River began to be diagnosed with cancer - so many that one hospital doctor commented, "Another one from Toms River" - it was the plant's fault, right?
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By Erika Bolstad, Barbara Barrett and Lesley Clark, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Activists urged the government Tuesday to let people post and track cancer cases across communities, a public-health effort that they say could lead to discoveries of new chemical-related cancer clusters throughout the United States as well as insights into disease management. A doctor, a cancer survivor, and high-wattage environmental advocate Erin Brockovich told a Senate panel that no federal agency effectively tracks cancers in a way that easily allows scientists to determine the existence of cancer clusters.
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists would receive $5.5 million to study a first-of-its-kind cancer cluster in Northeastern Pennsylvania under a provision inserted by Sen. Arlen Specter in the federal spending bill moving through Congress. The cluster is potentially linked to environmental hazards. Under the $410 billion federal spending bill moving through Congress, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would receive $5 million to study cases of polycythemia vera (PV), a rare blood cancer that turned up in unusually high numbers in an area 80 miles northwest of Philadelphia, said Specter (R., Pa.)
NEWS
November 17, 2006 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nothing was found in the soil and water of Pennsauken Creek that might have caused residents of a Mount Laurel neighborhood to be stricken with cancer and other diseases over the last three decades, preliminary test results show. The samples were taken from the south branch of the creek behind Countryside Lane in the Countryside Farms neighborhood. "Everything back there is clean," Mayor Pete McCaffrey said yesterday. "We are doing some additional testing in other areas just to be 100 percent sure.
NEWS
October 18, 2006 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Water and soil samples from the Pennsauken Creek in Mount Laurel will be tested to see whether toxins exist that may have stricken nearby residents with cancer and other diseases over several years. The samples could be gathered as early as today, Mayor Peter McCaffrey told residents of the Countryside Farms neighborhood who packed Monday night's Township Committee meeting. The results should be available in two to three weeks. "We will make sure the residents over there know the results as soon as possible," he said.
NEWS
October 14, 2006 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Health told officials in Mount Laurel yesterday that the Countryside Farms residential development is not a cancer cluster. While residents in the 274-home community reported about two dozen cases of cancer as well as gastrointestinal or neurological diseases in 11 homes along Schoolhouse Lane by current or former residents, the state focused on the occurrences of cancer. It determined that the cancer rates at Countryside were 25 percent lower than in the rest of the state, said Eddy Bresnitz, department commissioner and epidemiologist.
NEWS
February 8, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Helen Strobel is just one of those people who has fallen in love with the town where she lives and wants to do whatever is necessary to keep it clean and safe for all. Strobel, who has a special interest in environmental issues, was recently appointed by the Township Committee to her 10th consecutive term as chair of the Cinnaminson Board of Health. "I just like the town and like to do something in the town," said Strobel, a 40-year resident. "I want to do something good. You're helping neighbors, the township and health concerns.
NEWS
February 10, 2002
Thanks to Toms River, the phrase "cancer cluster" has taken on an ominous reality in our area. Between 1979 and 1995 in Dover Township, the Ocean County municipality that includes Toms River, 90 children were found to have various types of cancer. Statisticians estimated that this population could be expected to have had 67 cases. Since the original cases, 28 more children there have been found to have cancer, according to their families. Sixteen of the 118 children have died. Families of affected children felt Toms River was a cancer cluster - an excess of a particular cancer at one time and place in a sharply defined population.
NEWS
December 17, 2001 | Daily News staff and wire reports
Cops celebrate holiday with special needs kids Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 28 will hold its annual holiday party for special needs children at noon today in the Hilton Hotel in Cherry Hill. More than 900 children were expected to attend the event, sponsored by the hotel, Cherry Hill Shoprite Supermarket, Springdale Deli, the Riversharks baseball team and philanthropist Kal Rudman. Among those on hand will be Eagles cheerleaders, Cherry Hill Police Chief Brian Malloy, Camden County Prosecutor Lee A. Solomon and, of course, Santa Claus.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Michael Gillick had a message for the parents and lawyers who were trading stories about "cancer clusters" after watching John Travolta's latest film. The Toms River, N.J., teen-ager had every right to speak. He was the first of more than 100 Toms River-area children to be hit by a wave of cancer that started 19 years ago. And at that recent meeting in Boston, he embraced a mother from Woburn, Mass., who had lost her son to a similar plague. "We're not going to go away," he vowed, speaking for children in Toms River and Woburn.
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