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August 2, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Jose Canseco lived up to a pregame promise he made to four young cancer patients, homering in his first two at-bats last night as the Chicago White Sox beat visiting Kansas City, 7-6. On Cancer Survivors Night, 450 patients and their families turned out at Comiskey Park. Four children - all under the age of 16 - were on the field for batting practice. Canseco promised the two girls and two boys he'd hit home runs for them. He hit a three-run homer in the first and a two-run shot in the third.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
When she answered a help wanted ad for nurses at Delaware County Memorial Hospital, working with cancer patients was not exactly what Cassie Sharrer had in mind. But when the subject came up, she told her superiors she would give it a try. Almost three years later, Sharrer has found oncology nursing a job that has its own kind of rewards. "The job is interesting because I do all kinds of nursing, including being a primary care giver, a health teacher, helping new patients adjust and working with the terminally ill," Sharrer said.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | By James Cordrey, Special to The Inquirer
Thom Bernitsky and Lenore Urban, husband and wife, feel free to speak openly to each other. So when his wife was diagnosed as having breast cancer in 1989, Bernitsky said, they naturally talked about their feelings of devastation and confusion. There were questions that needed to be answered - the "whys," as Bernitsky put it - and depression that needed to be faced and dealt with. They sought counseling and went to sessions together. Bernitsky went to a partners group for husbands of women with breast cancer at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 15, 2002 | By Rosalee Rhodes FOR THE INQUIRER
The American Cancer Society's Look Good . . . Feel Better Support Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon on the first Tuesday of the month at Virtua-Memorial Hospital Burlington County (Mount Holly) and quarterly from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Barry D. Brown Health Education Center in Voorhees. The program is designed to help newly diagnosed cancer patients improve their appearance and self-image with hands-on beauty techniques. Women will learn about hair-loss options, such as wigs, turbans and scarves, and will receive a free kit of cosmetics.
NEWS
September 30, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tears come into Carol Dawkins' eyes as she talks about her mastectomy, a result of breast cancer. At first, she didn't want to look at her chest, she says. Now, when she does, she experiences a sense of loss. "I look at myself and I see two scars where my breasts were," the 54-year-old woman from West Philadelphia says. "There is a certain sadness. . . . " Unable to go on, Dawkins wipes her eyes as Mattie Wilkerson, whose lymphoma is in remission, holds and pats her hand. Dawkins and Wilkerson, who is 58 and lives in Northeast Philadelphia, are sitting in a cancer support group at the Wellness Community of Philadelphia, a nonprofit center in West Fairmount Park that offers free weekly group meetings for cancer patients and, separately, for their families and friends.
NEWS
June 14, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Being around the relentlessly cheerful Patricia Thrush can be exhausting. The raindrops that ruined your morning? Beautiful. Cleaning house on a Saturday? What fun! Doesn't she know there's a recession on? Of course. But these days, very little fazes Thrush, who five years ago finished treatment for an aggressive breast cancer she believed would kill her long before now. Life looks way different today. "Every morning is so wonderful," she said. Thrush, of Neptune, N.J., is the 49-year-old mother of six beautiful daughters and has two lively granddaughters and a husband she still calls "the light of my life" after 27 years of marriage.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
The coordinators of a "Living With Cancer" workshop have decided to move the event this year to a "more relaxed" location in hope of attracting more people who need help in dealing with the disease. Instead of holding the annual workshop in a hospital, as the Burlington County Unit of the American Cancer Society has done for the last two years, it will be at the Landmark Inn in Maple Shade, said Joanne Bernacki, a Cancer Society volunteer who is coordinating the event. The free program is scheduled from 1 to 4 p.m. June 6 at the Landmark Inn, Routes 38 and 73. "This will be a safe place for cancer patients and their families to get information and to recognize there are other people dealing with the same issues," said Bernacki, an oncology nurse who will be host for the program.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
The road to recovery can be a long and lonely one for cancer patients. But Charles and Elizabeth Dahl, a retired couple who live in Mount Holly, do their best to make it a little less bumpy. They are two of about 40 people in Burlington County who volunteer as drivers to transport cancer patients needing rides to area hospitals for treatments. And besides the driving, the Dahls try to offer emotional support as the patients are on their way to receive what could be painful or difficult treatments.
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NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
GREETINGS, Pope Francis! Your itinerary was announced yesterday - and, wow, you'll be one busy pontiff during the two days you're in Philly for September's World Meeting of Families. So I feel bad asking you to squeeze one more obligation into a schedule already packed with Masses, speeches and face time with seminarians and prisoners. Still, I'm hoping you'll stop by the home of Mike Aichenbaum. He lives in Bryn Mawr, just 5 miles from St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, where you'll be staying during your visit.
NEWS
May 22, 2015
AGREAT MANY people who have a giving heart, and unfortunately they are frequently the targets of scammers. In an astounding case announced this week, the Federal Trade Commission and law-enforcement officials from every state and the District of Columbia have charged four cancer charities with bilking donors out of $187 million between 2008 and 2012. The case is the largest action of its type involving charity fraud, said Jessica Rich, director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection, at a news conference.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The guests of honor at the St. Christopher's Hospital for Children "prom" hit the red carpet on Saturday well after the paparazzi - staff, family members, and a few professional photographers - had staked out key vantage points along the red velvet ropes. Finally, 55 children with cancer strode out or rolled in as their names were announced one by one. The girls wore frilly, shiny dresses. Most of the boys were in black suits. Little Liam, who had just turned 1, went first, in his father's arms.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alex Niles, 32, formerly of Yardley, a businessman who created clothing designed to provide comfort for cancer patients during treatment, died Wednesday, April 8, of gastric cancer at his mother's home in the Forest Hills section of New York City. Mr. Niles founded CureWear, a nonprofit that made clothing with a flap so an intravenous line could be hooked up to a medical port without requiring the wearer to undress. His own health crisis inspired Mr. Niles to make treatment "a little more comfortable for the chronically ill," his family said in a statement.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one would chide a bald chemo patient for making bad decisions about her hair. But a stranger told one of Beth Eaby-Sandy's cancer patients - a woman whose treatment had made her skin turn bright red - that she "really should wear sunscreen. " The patient, who already felt conspicuous, was upset, said Eaby-Sandy, a nurse practitioner who works with lung cancer patients at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The stranger was rude, no doubt, but her ignorance is understandable.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patient and physician groups cheered Monday as the Pennsylvania House overwhelmingly passed legislation to equalize patients' out-of-pocket costs for oral and intravenous cancer drugs. Patients currently may be charged thousands of dollars a month for cancer pills, vs. a $50 co-payment for a dose of a drug given through a vein, because most insurers cover the two formulations in different ways. This is the second consecutive year the House has passed a bill; its prospects in the Senate are unclear.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It is called Sacred Heart Home, and its work is just that: sacred. For 84 years, a group of nuns has been caring for poor people dying from cancer in their gleaming home on the edge of Hunting Park. They do it free of charge. The Dominican Sisters of Hawthorne accept no payment of any kind from patients, insurance companies, or the government. Though its sisters are Roman Catholic, Sacred Heart receives no funding stream from any diocese or church.   "Isn't that a miracle?"
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the staff at Abington Memorial Hospital handed the breast cancer patient its new "Distress Thermometer" questionnaire, she instantly felt conflicted. How could she, an early-stage patient with a good prognosis, say how she was really feeling when she saw how much worse off others in the radiation-treatment waiting room were? She left it blank. A week later, the staff asked again. Come January, cancer programs that want accreditation from the American College of Surgeons' Commission on Cancer will be required to formally ask all cancer patients about their psychosocial needs.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While there is much hopeful news these days on the cancer treatment front, a new report finds that many patients are suffering from unmet financial, emotional, and physical needs. Many struggle with serious anxiety, fatigue, and difficulty working, according to the Cancer Support Community report. As they live longer, patients say they need more help coping with long-term side effects. A significant portion have skimped on medical care and many have cut spending on food to save money.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
"What's a brush? What's a comb? What's a bad hair day? Can you please remind me?" Tom Gillin, a bald cancer patient, raps into a mirror with an equally bald doctor at his side. Both are sporting curly blond wigs. "I celebrate my time here," Gillin says later in his music video about life with cancer at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. A 19-year-old who was discharged from the hospital Sept. 12 after five months of care for leukemia, Gillin created a parody rap video to two of Jay Z's songs.
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