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August 2, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Jose Canseco lived up to a pregame promise he made to four young cancer patients, homering in his first two at-bats last night as the Chicago White Sox beat visiting Kansas City, 7-6. On Cancer Survivors Night, 450 patients and their families turned out at Comiskey Park. Four children - all under the age of 16 - were on the field for batting practice. Canseco promised the two girls and two boys he'd hit home runs for them. He hit a three-run homer in the first and a two-run shot in the third.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
When she answered a help wanted ad for nurses at Delaware County Memorial Hospital, working with cancer patients was not exactly what Cassie Sharrer had in mind. But when the subject came up, she told her superiors she would give it a try. Almost three years later, Sharrer has found oncology nursing a job that has its own kind of rewards. "The job is interesting because I do all kinds of nursing, including being a primary care giver, a health teacher, helping new patients adjust and working with the terminally ill," Sharrer said.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | By James Cordrey, Special to The Inquirer
Thom Bernitsky and Lenore Urban, husband and wife, feel free to speak openly to each other. So when his wife was diagnosed as having breast cancer in 1989, Bernitsky said, they naturally talked about their feelings of devastation and confusion. There were questions that needed to be answered - the "whys," as Bernitsky put it - and depression that needed to be faced and dealt with. They sought counseling and went to sessions together. Bernitsky went to a partners group for husbands of women with breast cancer at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 15, 2002 | By Rosalee Rhodes FOR THE INQUIRER
The American Cancer Society's Look Good . . . Feel Better Support Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon on the first Tuesday of the month at Virtua-Memorial Hospital Burlington County (Mount Holly) and quarterly from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Barry D. Brown Health Education Center in Voorhees. The program is designed to help newly diagnosed cancer patients improve their appearance and self-image with hands-on beauty techniques. Women will learn about hair-loss options, such as wigs, turbans and scarves, and will receive a free kit of cosmetics.
NEWS
September 30, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tears come into Carol Dawkins' eyes as she talks about her mastectomy, a result of breast cancer. At first, she didn't want to look at her chest, she says. Now, when she does, she experiences a sense of loss. "I look at myself and I see two scars where my breasts were," the 54-year-old woman from West Philadelphia says. "There is a certain sadness. . . . " Unable to go on, Dawkins wipes her eyes as Mattie Wilkerson, whose lymphoma is in remission, holds and pats her hand. Dawkins and Wilkerson, who is 58 and lives in Northeast Philadelphia, are sitting in a cancer support group at the Wellness Community of Philadelphia, a nonprofit center in West Fairmount Park that offers free weekly group meetings for cancer patients and, separately, for their families and friends.
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steve Sewell hadn't given much thought to forgiveness until he started visiting his friend Ouida Coley while she was getting treatment for metastic breast cancer. Her hospital offered support groups for people who struggle with unforgiveness - the toxic anger and aggravation that comes from holding on to grudges and blame. A former chaplain there wrote a book about it after noticing that many of the patients he saw were burdened by unresolved hurt and guilt. Sewell, a testicular cancer survivor from West Chester, saw the book the first time he visited Coley.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
The coordinators of a "Living With Cancer" workshop have decided to move the event this year to a "more relaxed" location in hope of attracting more people who need help in dealing with the disease. Instead of holding the annual workshop in a hospital, as the Burlington County Unit of the American Cancer Society has done for the last two years, it will be at the Landmark Inn in Maple Shade, said Joanne Bernacki, a Cancer Society volunteer who is coordinating the event. The free program is scheduled from 1 to 4 p.m. June 6 at the Landmark Inn, Routes 38 and 73. "This will be a safe place for cancer patients and their families to get information and to recognize there are other people dealing with the same issues," said Bernacki, an oncology nurse who will be host for the program.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
The road to recovery can be a long and lonely one for cancer patients. But Charles and Elizabeth Dahl, a retired couple who live in Mount Holly, do their best to make it a little less bumpy. They are two of about 40 people in Burlington County who volunteer as drivers to transport cancer patients needing rides to area hospitals for treatments. And besides the driving, the Dahls try to offer emotional support as the patients are on their way to receive what could be painful or difficult treatments.
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NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's medical marijuana bill was signed into law in April, but it will be two years before most patients can take advantage of it. That's how long the state has to come up with specific regulations to build this industry. Judging from the range of topics and speakers Friday at a daylong "Medical Marijuana Regulatory-Palooza," it may take at least that long to figure it all out. "We are about to do something that has never been done before," said State Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery)
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Men with metastatic prostate cancer have a surprisingly high rate of inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes, suggesting that all men with such advanced prostate cancer should be considered for genetic testing, a new study concludes. Genetic testing is not recommended for men with cancer confined to the prostate - or men whose cancer later spreads - because studies have found less than 5 percent have defective DNA-repair genes. But the prevalence of such defects among men who are initially diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer has been unclear, according to the new study, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers from six leading cancer centers in the United States and Britain.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania this week became the 41st state to pass controversial legislation aimed at making oral cancer drugs more affordable for patients. The bill, which passed both chambers of the legislature unanimously Thursday, was headed to Gov. Wolf, whose office said Friday that he would sign it into law. Out-of-pocket costs for intravenous chemotherapy - which requires going to a medical office for infusions - are much lower than patients' costs...
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
Less than 5 percent of adult cancer patients take part in the clinical trials critical to finding new treatments, a network of patient advocates reported Wednesday. The Cancer Support Community, an international group with chapters in major cities, released the numbers at a Philadelphia news conference that highlighted an ongoing campaign to increase awareness in the hope of reducing cancer deaths. The organization surveyed 506 patients and 81 caregivers about their beliefs, experiences, and information related to clinical trial participation.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Nineteen years ago, Elyce Cardonick got a call about a newly diagnosed lymphoma patient whose fast-growing chest tumor was causing severe breathing problems. The cancer patient was 13 weeks pregnant and had rejected her oncologist's advice to abort before starting toxic chemotherapy. Cardonick, a young maternal-fetal medicine specialist then at Jefferson University Hospital , discovered that little was known about treating cancer during pregnancy. The issue became her calling, inspiring her to create the Pregnancy and Cancer Registry to collect data about treatment and long-term results for both mothers and children.
NEWS
April 6, 2016
ISSUE | CANCER Help patients now As an institution that cares for many of Pennsylvania's cancer patients, the Penn State Cancer Institute was thrilled about Vice President Biden's "moonshot" to accelerate the development of treatments and cures. But we can't forget about the nearly 700,000 Pennsylvania cancer patients who need treatment today. House Bill 60, the Oral Chemotherapy Parity Act, would provide affordable access to oral anticancer medications. An outdated insurance law makes these medications cost-prohibitive for many patients, especially compared with intravenous chemotherapy.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Formula Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Berwyn, and Rockland Immunochemicals Inc., in Limerick, announced a collaboration Monday to develop cancer immunotherapies, focusing on Formula's Cytokine Induced Killer (C.I.K.) cell-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) technology to treat cancer. Financial terms were not disclosed. Rockland will provide the research staff and a 60,000-square-foot research and development facility to develop and increase Formula's product pipeline, Formula president and CEO Maurits W. Geerlings said.
NEWS
January 26, 2016
By Robert Graboyes and Thomas Stossel President Obama has put Vice President Biden in charge of a "moonshot" to cure cancer. Biden recently lost his son Beau to the disease, so his sincerity and passion are assured. And everybody - irrespective of political persuasion - can agree that curing this dread disease is a noble pursuit. Unfortunately, the timeworn moonshot analogy is inappropriate. Curing cancer is not at all like landing on the moon. When President John F. Kennedy articulated his moonshot project in May 1961, it was a narrowly focused, clearly defined engineering problem.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
The United States compares well to six other developed nations on some measures of end-of-life care, such as the percentage of patients who die in the hospital, but we're still on the pricey side, according to the first international comparison of its kind. Ezekiel Emanuel, chair of the department of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania, was senior author of the paper, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It compared site of death, health-care use, and hospital cost for cancer patients over 65 in Belgium, Canada, England, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, and the U.S. Among the findings: The U.S. had the lowest proportion of patients die in acute-care hospitals, 22.2 percent.
NEWS
January 11, 2016
Ellen Stovall, 69, a three-time cancer patient nationally known among physicians, legislators and policymakers as one of the country's most forceful advocates for cancer survivors, died Jan. 5 at a hospital in Rockville, Md. Mrs. Stovall's death was announced by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, where she was president and CEO from 1992 to 2008. Her brother, Stephen Lewis, said she had cardiac ailments related to her radiation and chemotherapy. Mrs. Stovall, a Scranton native, was 24 and the mother of a newborn boy when she learned that she had Stage 4 Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1971.
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