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Cancer Patients

NEWS
May 5, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
The coordinators of a "Living With Cancer" workshop have decided to move the event this year to a "more relaxed" location in hope of attracting more people who need help in dealing with the disease. Instead of holding the annual workshop in a hospital, as the Burlington County Unit of the American Cancer Society has done for the last two years, it will be at the Landmark Inn in Maple Shade, said Joanne Bernacki, a Cancer Society volunteer who is coordinating the event. The free program is scheduled from 1 to 4 p.m. June 6 at the Landmark Inn, Routes 38 and 73. "This will be a safe place for cancer patients and their families to get information and to recognize there are other people dealing with the same issues," said Bernacki, an oncology nurse who will be host for the program.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
The road to recovery can be a long and lonely one for cancer patients. But Charles and Elizabeth Dahl, a retired couple who live in Mount Holly, do their best to make it a little less bumpy. They are two of about 40 people in Burlington County who volunteer as drivers to transport cancer patients needing rides to area hospitals for treatments. And besides the driving, the Dahls try to offer emotional support as the patients are on their way to receive what could be painful or difficult treatments.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Cynthia Billhartz Gregorian, St. Louis Post-Dispatch (MCT)
ST. LOUIS - For a lot of people, weathering the winter is no fun. Cold temperatures. Shorter days. More colds and flu. Weathering it all with cancer is worse. Before Jerry Miller was diagnosed with Stage 3B colon cancer last summer, he walked pretty much everywhere, year-round. And he loved it. "My car was stolen 12 years ago, and I never bothered to replace it," said Miller, 44, of St. Louis. Not anymore. In addition to fatigue and weakness, chemotherapy has wreaked havoc on his immune system and caused extreme cold sensitivity in his hands, feet and other parts of his body.
NEWS
November 15, 1987 | By Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jessica Wurst, a 7-year-old cancer patient from Ivyland, Bucks County, spent four evenings earlier this month sick to her stomach because of her monthly chemotherapy treatments. By the end of the week she was feeling better and preparing for a weekend of cheerleading and celebrating at a friend's birthday party. But then, Jessica's 4-year-old brother complained of stomach problems just like his sister's. " '(Jessica) got a lot of attention for four days doing that. I think I'll give it a whirl,' " Denise Wurst said yesterday, analyzing her son's thinking.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was tee time for the 124 players who joined in the fourth annual MBF Golf Classic on Monday at St. Davids Golf Club in Wayne. Touring pro Rob Strano of Peggy Kirk Bell's School of Golf in Pine Needles, N.C., played in the fund-raising event, which included a barbecue lunch, dinner, 18 holes of golf and a golf clinic on sand shots by Strano. Major sponsors of the classic were Harron Leasing Corp. and Wilkie Lexus of Ardmore. Chairing the event were Betty and Bill Bole of Villanova.
LIVING
June 17, 1996 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Marie McCook opted to fight her fast-growing breast cancer with high-dose chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant, her choices were grim. The transplant was a controversial, experimental approach that killed up to 10 percent of patients. Yet with standard-dose chemotherapy and radiation, she could have been dead within three years. Today, five years after she made that frightening choice, the Oxford Circle resident is proof that transplantation works. "I have clear mammograms and my CAT scans are clear," said the 40-year-old wife and mother of two. "It's a very hard road, but the light at the end of the tunnel is not a freight train.
LIVING
June 21, 1999 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine this: There are people who look forward to chemotherapy. People like Martha Brooks, a 48-year-old Berks County woman who has been coming to the gynecology "chemo room" at Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania since October for treatment of ovarian cancer. Of course, she's not thrilled about the chemotherapy itself. But she does enjoy coming each week to see fellow patients who have become friends while sitting side-by-side for hours, waiting for big plastic bags of chemicals to empty into their veins.
NEWS
September 9, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Sandra Mann, a philanthropist and former member of the board of directors at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, working to improve the lives of cancer patients was a longtime passion. Mrs. Mann, 61, who lived in Rittenhouse Square, died Wednesday, Sept. 5, of a stroke resulting from kidney cancer, at Pennsylvania Hospital, her relatives said. Her husband, Fredric R. Mann II, a Philadelphia lawyer and businessman, said his wife served on the board of directors of Fox Chase for 15 years.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While most older people say they don't want aggressive care at the end of life, many get it anyway. Care in the last month of life for Medicare patients with advanced cancer typically is even more aggressive in the Philadelphia area than in the nation as a whole, concludes a report from the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which studies regional differences in care. It released a report last week that showed the percentage of cancer patients who died in hospitals in 2010, or were hospitalized or in an intensive care unit in their last month.
LIVING
August 22, 1994 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They call themselves a community, this collection of people who come together to laugh and cry and face the ever-real possibility that death could be lurking around the next bend. There's Pat, a legal secretary. She has lung cancer. There's James, a government worker. He has colon cancer. There are Maryann, who worked cleaning houses before her lung cancer, and Joe, a businessman with prostate cancer. They gather each Tuesday afternoon at the Wellness Community, along with Edith and Vicky and Anthony, to learn how better to live for a future that sometimes seems awfully uncertain.
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