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Cancer Patients

NEWS
August 15, 2011
Music, we can pretty much all agree, is a good thing. New research suggests that it can benefit cancer patients, too. A review of 30 previous trials involving 1,891 participants found that both formal music therapy and informal listening appeared to help reduce anxiety and pain, and improved quality of life for people with cancer. The analysis, published last week by the Cochrane Library, came with plenty of caveats. A key one is that virtually none of the studies were "blinded" - a gold standard of research, intended to prevent bias, in which participants don't know if they received an intervention.
NEWS
November 15, 1987 | By Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jessica Wurst, a 7-year-old cancer patient from Ivyland, Bucks County, spent four evenings earlier this month sick to her stomach because of her monthly chemotherapy treatments. By the end of the week she was feeling better and preparing for a weekend of cheerleading and celebrating at a friend's birthday party. But then, Jessica's 4-year-old brother complained of stomach problems just like his sister's. " '(Jessica) got a lot of attention for four days doing that. I think I'll give it a whirl,' " Denise Wurst said yesterday, analyzing her son's thinking.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was tee time for the 124 players who joined in the fourth annual MBF Golf Classic on Monday at St. Davids Golf Club in Wayne. Touring pro Rob Strano of Peggy Kirk Bell's School of Golf in Pine Needles, N.C., played in the fund-raising event, which included a barbecue lunch, dinner, 18 holes of golf and a golf clinic on sand shots by Strano. Major sponsors of the classic were Harron Leasing Corp. and Wilkie Lexus of Ardmore. Chairing the event were Betty and Bill Bole of Villanova.
LIVING
June 17, 1996 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Marie McCook opted to fight her fast-growing breast cancer with high-dose chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant, her choices were grim. The transplant was a controversial, experimental approach that killed up to 10 percent of patients. Yet with standard-dose chemotherapy and radiation, she could have been dead within three years. Today, five years after she made that frightening choice, the Oxford Circle resident is proof that transplantation works. "I have clear mammograms and my CAT scans are clear," said the 40-year-old wife and mother of two. "It's a very hard road, but the light at the end of the tunnel is not a freight train.
LIVING
June 21, 1999 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine this: There are people who look forward to chemotherapy. People like Martha Brooks, a 48-year-old Berks County woman who has been coming to the gynecology "chemo room" at Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania since October for treatment of ovarian cancer. Of course, she's not thrilled about the chemotherapy itself. But she does enjoy coming each week to see fellow patients who have become friends while sitting side-by-side for hours, waiting for big plastic bags of chemicals to empty into their veins.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
With cancer, the complicated combination of chemotherapy and surgeries plus side effects lead patients to seek alternative medicine more often than people with other afflictions. Sixty-five percent of cancer survivors have used complementary and alternative medicine, a 2011 study in the Journal of Cancer Survivorship found, compared with 52 percent of those who haven't had cancer. Yet these largely unregulated treatments are often unproven and can lead patients down a health-care rabbit hole unless they have guidance.
NEWS
July 2, 2011 | By Joshua Adam Hicks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nine-year-old Katie Haughney deals with a common problem for the siblings of cancer patients. Her brother Charlie, 4, is fighting stage-four neuroblastoma, and the world seems to revolve around him. "My brother gets all the attention, and I'm the oldest, so I have more responsibilities to take care of at home now," Katie said. "Sometimes it gets to my head, and I get all upset. " Camp No Worries, founded by a college undergrad and recovered cancer patient then living in Moorestown, tries to remedy that problem by bringing together pediatric cancer patients and their siblings at a summer retreat.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
The surgeon delivered the bad news on Elizabeth Koniz's lumpectomy: "We didn't get clean margins. " Stunned, she couldn't think of anything else. "The words rang in my head," said Koniz, a 48-year-old admissions coordinator at Temple University School of Medicine. "I had terrible anxiety. I was nervous at medical appointments. I had tremendous trouble sleeping and cried for weeks after the diagnosis. " About a third of cancer patients experience high levels of anxiety - intense distress, although not typically to the level of post-traumatic stress disorder - after getting the diagnosis or during a difficult moment in treatment.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While most older people say they don't want aggressive care at the end of life, many get it anyway. Care in the last month of life for Medicare patients with advanced cancer typically is even more aggressive in the Philadelphia area than in the nation as a whole, concludes a report from the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which studies regional differences in care. It released a report last week that showed the percentage of cancer patients who died in hospitals in 2010, or were hospitalized or in an intensive care unit in their last month.
NEWS
September 9, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Sandra Mann, a philanthropist and former member of the board of directors at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, working to improve the lives of cancer patients was a longtime passion. Mrs. Mann, 61, who lived in Rittenhouse Square, died Wednesday, Sept. 5, of a stroke resulting from kidney cancer, at Pennsylvania Hospital, her relatives said. Her husband, Fredric R. Mann II, a Philadelphia lawyer and businessman, said his wife served on the board of directors of Fox Chase for 15 years.
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