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Cancer Patients

NEWS
December 30, 2010 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
AS WE head into 2011, I'd like to offer a stadium cheer for Gerald Furgione, executive director of PhillyCarShare, for trying to level the playing field between city and suburban cancer patients. I know: You wouldn't think patients' ZIP codes would affect whether they're able to travel to their treatment. Especially since the American Cancer Society has a terrific national program called Road to Recovery. It pairs volunteer drivers with cancer patients who are unable or too sick to drive to their appointments, or have no one to take them there.
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every day, the cancer patients in Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital fight their way through a medical wilderness of tests, pills, surgery and chemotherapy. Relief comes a few moments at a time. On Friday mornings, it arrives in the form of a gray-haired widower from Newtown, Bucks County. Leon Kartzmer swings open the doors to their rooms carrying warm, sweet manna from a heavenly bakery nearby. It's challah, for hope. "We want them to know that their doctor cares enough about them to give them this staff of life," said Kartzmer, 67, a retired accountant.
NEWS
March 30, 1999 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sue Whitehead carefully dabbed a few drops of concealer on the dark circles under her emerald eyes, just like she had seen demonstrated on a video. "I usually just use eye shadow and mascara," Whitehead said later, while drawing in eyebrows. "This is foreign to me. " She was one of a dozen women to attend a session of "Look Good, Feel Better" at Chester County Hospital recently. The program, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, teaches cancer patients how to give themselves makeovers to hide the dryness, discoloration and hair loss that accompany chemotherapy and radiation.
NEWS
March 11, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judi Rothman found out a year ago that she had colon cancer that had spread to her liver. Every day since then, she has lived with worry. She can push it beneath the surface of her life most of the time. But the minute her doctor tells her it's time for another CAT scan, the fear springs like a cobra, suddenly too big and menacing to ignore. "In the back of your mind, it's always there that the other shoe is going to drop, and that becomes more active in the days before that CAT scan until I hear what happened," said Rothman, who is 61 and lives in the Northeast.
NEWS
September 16, 1998 | By Richard Sine, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As high doses of radiation attack the cancer in his prostate gland, Charles Miller Jr. stares up at the glowing image of a pink dogwood tree in bloom. The spacious, wood-paneled room at Delaware County Memorial Hospital is dimly lit except for the lighted panels on the walls and ceiling, which display pastoral images of azaleas and geese in a pond. They are nearly as arresting as stained glass. Miller, 73, has been taking his cancer in stride. The Drexel Hill resident says he has not had any of the side effects he has been warned about.
NEWS
June 11, 2006 | By Tanya Barrientos and Eliza Fox FOR THE INQUIRER
It?s gray, and full and wavy. Jackson Hunsicker knows people are checking out her hair, because her book is about not having any. Turning Heads : Portraits of Grace, Inspiration, and Possibilities - a collection of 59 artistic pictures by 59 famous photographers - is Hunsicker?s personal tribute to women facing chemotherapy, an idea the Philadelphia native and Springside School alumna was certain would be a hit in the publishing world....
LIVING
November 19, 2008 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
Dana McCleary can remember the precise moment her life began unraveling. It was the morning of Oct. 8, 2007, and while thinking about a colleague who had just died of breast cancer, she felt a pain in her right breast. "This has to be my imagination," she recalls thinking. "I'm totally fine. " But at home later that day, she felt a lump in her right breast, and at age 28, entered an unknown, unwelcome universe. The very next day, she saw a breast surgeon and went through several diagnostic procedures.
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | By C.R. Harper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Coping with cancer is more complicated than just receiving medical treatment: Pain, paperwork, therapy, lawyers and wigs can be part of it, too. Because doctors cannot do everything, a new program created by the Crozer- Chester Health System has been set up with hopes of helping patients with all their cancer-related problems. The Common Thread, which started yesterday, will provide any cancer patient in the tri-state region with a case manager to help him or her find out which services are needed and how to get them.
NEWS
May 24, 2000 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If doctors do not ask, cancer patients typically will not tell them about alternative medical therapies they are using, potentially compromising their treatment, according to a new study conducted at the University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center. The study of 196 cancer patients showed that 79 - or 40 percent - used alternative therapies, and that the vast majority of them did not tell their doctor unless they were asked specific questions. "Many patients don't realize that they need to divulge the use of any self-prescribed substances to their physicians," said James Metz, a Penn radiation oncologist who presented his findings yesterday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology in New Orleans.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | By Jaik Sanders, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Gilda's Club, the nonprofit organization named for former Saturday Night Live comedian Gilda Radner that offers social and emotional support to cancer patients, is close to opening in Bucks County - its first chapter in Pennsylvania. Supporters said yesterday they would be able to open the branch as soon as they raised an additional $50,000, lease space, and hire an executive director. They already have $200,000 on hand. The organization, based in New York City, provides support groups, lectures, workshops, psychotherapists and social functions, all free, to people diagnosed with cancer, as well as to their friends and families.
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