CollectionsCancer Patients
IN THE NEWS

Cancer Patients

NEWS
June 20, 2011
In a move that could one day help cancer patients mine their own DNA for new treatment options, Fox Chase Cancer Center last week announced it was striking a partnership with the California-based biotechnology giant Life Technologies Corp. The plan is to map the genes of patients' tumors so doctors can devise precise treatments. Fighting cancer remains fiendishly complex. "At a genetic level, any given tumor type is different in different individuals," says Jeff Boyd, senior vice president for molecular medicine at Fox Chase.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new, fast-acting opioid pain lozenge won Food and Drug Administration approval yesterday, expanding the offerings of acute-pain drugs for cancer patients. The Food and Drug Administration approved Cephalon Inc.'s cancer pain reliever after the stock market had closed. Shares of the Frazer company, which closed up $1.46 at $58.90 in anticipation that the FDA would approve the drug, rose slightly at one point in after-hours trading. Fentora is a successor cancer-pain treatment to Cephalon's Actiq, which faces lower-cost generic competition from Barr Laboratories at any time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many U.S. patients with head and neck cancer have lengthy treatment delays that increase their chances of dying of their disease, according to a new study by Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers. The analysis also found evidence of a dilemma that faces cancer patients in general: Getting care at leading medical centers can improve survival, but pursuing that care can add to delays. As any patient knows, it takes time to get referrals, second opinions, advanced diagnostic tests, and a treatment spot at a major medical center.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It is called Sacred Heart Home, and its work is just that: sacred. For 84 years, a group of nuns has been caring for poor people dying from cancer in their gleaming home on the edge of Hunting Park. They do it free of charge. The Dominican Sisters of Hawthorne accept no payment of any kind from patients, insurance companies, or the government. Though its sisters are Roman Catholic, Sacred Heart receives no funding stream from any diocese or church.   "Isn't that a miracle?"
NEWS
April 18, 1994 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Jude Plum Salon & Health Spa not only improves looks with hair highlighting, facials, massages and manicures. It also bolsters the confidence of cancer patients. Plum's services include hair replacement and skin care for people undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatments. For women who have had a mastectomy, his staff will provide prosthetic devices that fit so they can be worn in a bathing suit. "We have a registered nurse on the staff who deals with chemotherapy patients," Plum said.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Except when her husband died and the time she had an eye operation, Emma Hardy has never missed a Friday morning with "the girls. " Oh yeah, you can also throw in a snowstorm or two, but that's it. For more than 30 years, Hardy - an exceptionally hearty soul about to celebrate her 88th birthday - has been getting together with "the girls" for a few hours of sharing, snipping, schmoozing and sewing. Especially sewing. Hardy and her friends are retired Bell Telephone employees who sit around a large table on the eighth floor of the Suburban Station building at 16th Street and John F. Kennedy Boulevard every other Friday, sewing hundreds of pads, bibs, bandages, compresses and shrouds for area cancer patients.
NEWS
June 10, 2003 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a dark and stormy day, but that didn't discourage The Today Show, local sports celebrities, and hordes of people from thronging to 7-year-old Alexandra Scott's lemonade stand Saturday, where a record $14,000 was raised to help childhood cancer patients, such as Alex herself. Last year's stand outside the girl's Main Line home raised $12,000 - and eventually generated a total of about $67,000 worth of contributions, which led her parents to register the "Alex's Lemonade Stand Fund" with the charity-administering Philadelphia Foundation.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | By Marilou Regan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Amanda Buhle, 6, used to cross off the squares on a calendar. For three years, she counted the days to the end of her leukemia treatments. Now, with her final treatment behind her as of Nov. 1, Amanda wants to help other children with cancer. She and her parents, of Lansdowne, are helping promote a 1993 calendar called Celebration! The calendar features the artworks of pediatric cancer patients. The pictures were drawn during the children's visits to the Cancer Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP)
NEWS
December 30, 2010 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
AS WE head into 2011, I'd like to offer a stadium cheer for Gerald Furgione, executive director of PhillyCarShare, for trying to level the playing field between city and suburban cancer patients. I know: You wouldn't think patients' ZIP codes would affect whether they're able to travel to their treatment. Especially since the American Cancer Society has a terrific national program called Road to Recovery. It pairs volunteer drivers with cancer patients who are unable or too sick to drive to their appointments, or have no one to take them there.
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every day, the cancer patients in Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital fight their way through a medical wilderness of tests, pills, surgery and chemotherapy. Relief comes a few moments at a time. On Friday mornings, it arrives in the form of a gray-haired widower from Newtown, Bucks County. Leon Kartzmer swings open the doors to their rooms carrying warm, sweet manna from a heavenly bakery nearby. It's challah, for hope. "We want them to know that their doctor cares enough about them to give them this staff of life," said Kartzmer, 67, a retired accountant.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|