CollectionsCancer Patients
IN THE NEWS

Cancer Patients

NEWS
January 25, 1994 | By C.R. Harper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Coping with cancer is more complicated than just receiving medical treatment: Pain, paperwork, therapy, lawyers and wigs can be part of it, too. Because doctors cannot do everything, a new program created by the Crozer- Chester Health System has been set up with hopes of helping patients with all their cancer-related problems. The Common Thread, which started yesterday, will provide any cancer patient in the tri-state region with a case manager to help him or her find out which services are needed and how to get them.
NEWS
May 24, 2000 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If doctors do not ask, cancer patients typically will not tell them about alternative medical therapies they are using, potentially compromising their treatment, according to a new study conducted at the University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center. The study of 196 cancer patients showed that 79 - or 40 percent - used alternative therapies, and that the vast majority of them did not tell their doctor unless they were asked specific questions. "Many patients don't realize that they need to divulge the use of any self-prescribed substances to their physicians," said James Metz, a Penn radiation oncologist who presented his findings yesterday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology in New Orleans.
SPORTS
July 13, 2010 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
TEN YEARS AGO or so, Marci Schankweiler was living a different life. She had a career as a tax attorney and was in the early years of her marriage to a young man named Peter Bossow. They had attended their high school prom together, gone to La Salle University and had looked forward to years of happiness when Peter was diagnosed at age 29 with a rare form of testicular cancer. For just over a year, Peter waged a courageous battle with the disease, a period during which he underwent surgery and chemotherapy.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | By Jaik Sanders, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Gilda's Club, the nonprofit organization named for former Saturday Night Live comedian Gilda Radner that offers social and emotional support to cancer patients, is close to opening in Bucks County - its first chapter in Pennsylvania. Supporters said yesterday they would be able to open the branch as soon as they raised an additional $50,000, lease space, and hire an executive director. They already have $200,000 on hand. The organization, based in New York City, provides support groups, lectures, workshops, psychotherapists and social functions, all free, to people diagnosed with cancer, as well as to their friends and families.
NEWS
October 16, 1999 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aside from the artfully arranged hay bales near its entrance, the turn-of-the-century barn in Fairmount Park looks anything but rustic now. The newly renovated building, once home to chickens, horses and homing pigeons, was reopened yesterday as part of a support center for cancer patients and their families. It has plush carpeting, computer hookups, a modern kitchen, and, in a nod to its past, barn-red trim around the windows. The barn is the latest addition to the campus of the Wellness Community of Philadelphia, a cancer support center that occupies four peaceful acres near Belmont Plateau under a long-term, dollar-a-year lease with the city.
NEWS
June 16, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Kasey Hall took a limousine home from the hospital after having her cancerous brain tumor removed. Her parents gave her a new television set with a remote control, and she picked the site of the family's vacation that year. A hospital social worker helped Hall and her parents deal with the disease. But her healthy younger siblings didn't "get" anything when their sister was sick. "There was resentment," said Hall, 21, of the relationship between her and her brother and sister 10 years ago. She said they expressed such feelings as: "what do I have to do, get cancer to get a new TV?"
BUSINESS
October 21, 2003 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
South Jersey cancer patients who crossed the river for treatment at Philadelphia hospitals will now have the option of getting the latest care at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey at Cooper University Hospital in Voorhees. Gov. McGreevey said yesterday that the state would provide $5 million to develop the partnership between Cooper and the New Brunswick-based Cancer Institute of New Jersey, one of 39 facilities nationwide affiliated with the National Cancer Institute. Other National Cancer Institute affiliates, providing comprehensive cancer treatment, include the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, the Fox Chase Cancer Center, and the Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
March 27, 2005 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Christine Bell likes to keep her promises. When (not if) she could overcome non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the Voorhees resident vowed, she would do something to help fellow cancer patients. "I always thought I had something to give to others, but for a long time I never knew what it was," said Bell, 50, who will graduate in May with a bachelor's degree in health and exercise science from Rowan University. On March 17, she began leading a weekly class for cancer patients, Well-Being Yoga, at the Kennedy Cancer Center in Sewell.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a warm yellow now, but until recently historic Ridgeland in West Fairmount Park was just another white elephant. Long vacant except for a few park offices, not architecturally notable enough to be a museum restoration candidate, Ridgeland - dating in part to 1719 - seemed destined to languish and decay as have many other Fairmount Park homes. But in a turnaround that park and preservation officials say could be a model for other park houses, Ridgeland found a new purpose and an agency willing to restore it. The park got a functioning landmark instead of an eyesore, and hundreds of people are drawn into West Fairmount who otherwise might never have come.
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | By Gina Kolata, Special to the Daily News
The diagnosis: cancer. Once the initial shock starts to fade, the questioning starts: Why? Why did this happen, and why did it happen to me? And what if my doctor is wrong in his prognosis? What if I should have a different treatment? The why questions are usually unanswerable. The more important ones, the what-if questions, can be answered. Often the best thing to do is ask yourself what if . . . and get a second opinion. There are occasions, in fact, when a second opinion can lead to a dramatic cure or improvement, rather than death.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|