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Cancer Patients

NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steve Sewell hadn't given much thought to forgiveness until he started visiting his friend Ouida Coley while she was getting treatment for metastic breast cancer. Her hospital offered support groups for people who struggle with unforgiveness - the toxic anger and aggravation that comes from holding on to grudges and blame. A former chaplain there wrote a book about it after noticing that many of the patients he saw were burdened by unresolved hurt and guilt. Sewell, a testicular cancer survivor from West Chester, saw the book the first time he visited Coley.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
GREETINGS, Pope Francis! Your itinerary was announced yesterday - and, wow, you'll be one busy pontiff during the two days you're in Philly for September's World Meeting of Families. So I feel bad asking you to squeeze one more obligation into a schedule already packed with Masses, speeches and face time with seminarians and prisoners. Still, I'm hoping you'll stop by the home of Mike Aichenbaum. He lives in Bryn Mawr, just 5 miles from St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, where you'll be staying during your visit.
NEWS
May 22, 2015
AGREAT MANY people who have a giving heart, and unfortunately they are frequently the targets of scammers. In an astounding case announced this week, the Federal Trade Commission and law-enforcement officials from every state and the District of Columbia have charged four cancer charities with bilking donors out of $187 million between 2008 and 2012. The case is the largest action of its type involving charity fraud, said Jessica Rich, director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection, at a news conference.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The guests of honor at the St. Christopher's Hospital for Children "prom" hit the red carpet on Saturday well after the paparazzi - staff, family members, and a few professional photographers - had staked out key vantage points along the red velvet ropes. Finally, 55 children with cancer strode out or rolled in as their names were announced one by one. The girls wore frilly, shiny dresses. Most of the boys were in black suits. Little Liam, who had just turned 1, went first, in his father's arms.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alex Niles, 32, formerly of Yardley, a businessman who created clothing designed to provide comfort for cancer patients during treatment, died Wednesday, April 8, of gastric cancer at his mother's home in the Forest Hills section of New York City. Mr. Niles founded CureWear, a nonprofit that made clothing with a flap so an intravenous line could be hooked up to a medical port without requiring the wearer to undress. His own health crisis inspired Mr. Niles to make treatment "a little more comfortable for the chronically ill," his family said in a statement.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one would chide a bald chemo patient for making bad decisions about her hair. But a stranger told one of Beth Eaby-Sandy's cancer patients - a woman whose treatment had made her skin turn bright red - that she "really should wear sunscreen. " The patient, who already felt conspicuous, was upset, said Eaby-Sandy, a nurse practitioner who works with lung cancer patients at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The stranger was rude, no doubt, but her ignorance is understandable.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patient and physician groups cheered Monday as the Pennsylvania House overwhelmingly passed legislation to equalize patients' out-of-pocket costs for oral and intravenous cancer drugs. Patients currently may be charged thousands of dollars a month for cancer pills, vs. a $50 co-payment for a dose of a drug given through a vein, because most insurers cover the two formulations in different ways. This is the second consecutive year the House has passed a bill; its prospects in the Senate are unclear.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It is called Sacred Heart Home, and its work is just that: sacred. For 84 years, a group of nuns has been caring for poor people dying from cancer in their gleaming home on the edge of Hunting Park. They do it free of charge. The Dominican Sisters of Hawthorne accept no payment of any kind from patients, insurance companies, or the government. Though its sisters are Roman Catholic, Sacred Heart receives no funding stream from any diocese or church.   "Isn't that a miracle?"
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the staff at Abington Memorial Hospital handed the breast cancer patient its new "Distress Thermometer" questionnaire, she instantly felt conflicted. How could she, an early-stage patient with a good prognosis, say how she was really feeling when she saw how much worse off others in the radiation-treatment waiting room were? She left it blank. A week later, the staff asked again. Come January, cancer programs that want accreditation from the American College of Surgeons' Commission on Cancer will be required to formally ask all cancer patients about their psychosocial needs.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While there is much hopeful news these days on the cancer treatment front, a new report finds that many patients are suffering from unmet financial, emotional, and physical needs. Many struggle with serious anxiety, fatigue, and difficulty working, according to the Cancer Support Community report. As they live longer, patients say they need more help coping with long-term side effects. A significant portion have skimped on medical care and many have cut spending on food to save money.
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