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Cancer Patients

NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
If palliative care were a new cancer drug, it would be hailed as a breakthrough, Diane Meier told a crowd at Christiana Hospital on Thursday. Palliative care, which focuses on easing patients' symptoms, supporting families, and discussing patient priorities, not only makes people feel better physically and emotionally, Meier said. It costs less because it keeps people out of hospitals and nursing homes. And, patients live longer. But palliative care is not a new type of chemotherapy, said Meier, an expert in geriatrics and palliative medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City and a MacArthur "genius" award winner.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
Not on the cheap At a hearing we held on Mayor Nutter's plan to contract out as many as 22,000 cases to court-appointed lawyers, not one of the 10 local, state, and national expert witnesses endorsed the city's for-profit model, and other testimony illuminated countless flaws that would usurp justice and expose the city to lawsuits and unforeseen expense. The private-sector model cannot work as an indigent-defense system. Adequate representation cannot be provided for $450 per case.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While most older people say they don't want aggressive care at the end of life, many get it anyway. Care in the last month of life for Medicare patients with advanced cancer typically is even more aggressive in the Philadelphia area than in the nation as a whole, concludes a report from the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which studies regional differences in care. It released a report last week that showed the percentage of cancer patients who died in hospitals in 2010, or were hospitalized or in an intensive care unit in their last month.
NEWS
September 15, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Danielle Ofri is one of those women who sets the bar awfully high for the rest of us. She's a doctor in New York with three kids, ages 7 to 12, and a husband who works. She manages to write books and edit the Bellevue Literary Review, which publishes creative writing about healing. She takes cello lessons. But this article is not about how Ofri's productivity makes us feel. It's about how patients and the practice of medicine make her and other doctors feel. That is the subject of her fourth and latest book, What Doctors Feel: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine . She'll be in town Wednesday to discuss the topic at Fox Chase Cancer Center Auditorium.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
Cynthia Lufkin, 51, whose marriage to a cofounder of Wall Street firm Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette created a New York power couple in social and philanthropic circles, died Wednesday at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan of complications from breast and lung cancer. Her home was in Washington, Conn., north of New York City. After being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 while pregnant with her second child, Ms. Lufkin focused her philanthropic work on the disease. With a degree in biochemistry, she was particularly interested in how healthy living could bolster the outlook for cancer patients, and her work led to the opening of the Cynthia Lufkin Fitness & Seminar Room at Sloan- Kettering's Evelyn H. Lauder Breast Center.
SPORTS
June 23, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jon DuBois has a rooting interest in the Boston Bruins as they try to win their second Stanley Cup in the last three seasons. "I'm a Bruins fan mostly because my kids grew up with the Bruins," DuBois, a graduate of Abington High and a highly respected cancer doctor at a Massachusetts hospital, said the other night. "But I grew up with the Flyers and followed every game. I'm a Bruins fan as a transplant, but deep down, you're always a Flyers fan. " DuBois, 52, helped coordinate the care of cancer patients whose treatments were disrupted by the Boston Marathon bombings and hospital lockdowns in April.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a move with potential to shake up the health-care market in Philadelphia and beyond, Cooper University Health Care in Camden is expected to announce on Monday a partnership with the MD Anderson Cancer Center of Houston, one of the nation's top-ranked treatment and research facilities. Cooper officials said they had signed a letter of intent to form the partnership with MD Anderson, which will manage a new $100 million cancer treatment center at Cooper's hospital campus in Camden.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is vanishingly rare for an experimental treatment to wipe out advanced, recurrent cancer, then keep the disease from coming back. Yet therapies driven by CARs have been doing exactly that in a small but growing number of blood-cancer patients at the University of Pennsylvania and other centers. In simplest terms, a CAR - chimeric antigen receptor - is a synthetic genetic structure that programs the patient's immune cells to recognize and attack cancer. But there is nothing simple about these molecular taskmasters.
SPORTS
May 9, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
BY NOW, MOST people have heard of Matt Kemp's incredible act of kindness. On Sunday, after losing a game to the Giants in San Francisco, the Dodgers' centerfielder kept a promise to third-base coach Tim Wallach to sign an autograph for a fan. The fan turned out to be Joshua Jones, a 19-year-old from Tracey, Calif., who has inoperable tumors on his spine and only 3 months to live. Kemp first gave Jones an autographed ball. Then he removed his cap and handed it over, too. He then pulled his still-buttoned No. 27 jersey over his head and placed it on Jones' lap. Finally, he took off his Nikes and gave them to Jones.
NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time, the American Urological Association is discouraging many men from having prostate cancer screening, and encouraging those who do to consider the harms as well as benefits. In guidelines issued Friday, the association recommends against routine PSA testing for men before age 40 or after age 70, men of any age with a life expectancy of less than a decade, or average-risk men ages 40 to 54. Men 55 to 69, and younger men who are at high risk because of their race or family history, should go through "shared decision making" with their doctors to weigh the pros and cons of screening, and their individual values, the guidelines say. The advice puts the urologists' group - traditionally fervent defenders of the PSA test - more in step with the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.
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