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Cancer Patients

NEWS
January 11, 2016
Ellen Stovall, 69, a three-time cancer patient nationally known among physicians, legislators and policymakers as one of the country's most forceful advocates for cancer survivors, died Jan. 5 at a hospital in Rockville, Md. Mrs. Stovall's death was announced by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, where she was president and CEO from 1992 to 2008. Her brother, Stephen Lewis, said she had cardiac ailments related to her radiation and chemotherapy. Mrs. Stovall, a Scranton native, was 24 and the mother of a newborn boy when she learned that she had Stage 4 Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1971.
NEWS
January 5, 2016
S HALABH JAIN, 30, of Center City, is founder, chairman and CEO of Hyalo Technologies, a biopharmaceutical company in University City. The startup is developing a biodegradable, targeted drug-delivery system called the HyaloSphere that will reduce systemic side effects of drugs and increase patient compliance. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: As a medical student I observed that the compliance rate was low and the systemic side effects were high among some cancer patients or other patients taking prescribed medications.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many U.S. patients with head and neck cancer have lengthy treatment delays that increase their chances of dying of their disease, according to a new study by Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers. The analysis also found evidence of a dilemma that faces cancer patients in general: Getting care at leading medical centers can improve survival, but pursuing that care can add to delays. As any patient knows, it takes time to get referrals, second opinions, advanced diagnostic tests, and a treatment spot at a major medical center.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Anita Gray lives with lobular breast cancer that has metastasized to her bones. So, once a month, she drives from Flying Hills, near Reading, to Northeast Philadelphia's Cancer Treatment Centers of America to meet with her oncologist and discuss palliative treatment. Yet on Thursday, after an additional talk with an orthopedic surgeon - Gray's hip bones are deteriorating from the disease - she had an appointment that was a bit more enjoyable: a reflexology and reiki session at the new Image Recovery Center.
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steve Sewell hadn't given much thought to forgiveness until he started visiting his friend Ouida Coley while she was getting treatment for metastic breast cancer. Her hospital offered support groups for people who struggle with unforgiveness - the toxic anger and aggravation that comes from holding on to grudges and blame. A former chaplain there wrote a book about it after noticing that many of the patients he saw were burdened by unresolved hurt and guilt. Sewell, a testicular cancer survivor from West Chester, saw the book the first time he visited Coley.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
GREETINGS, Pope Francis! Your itinerary was announced yesterday - and, wow, you'll be one busy pontiff during the two days you're in Philly for September's World Meeting of Families. So I feel bad asking you to squeeze one more obligation into a schedule already packed with Masses, speeches and face time with seminarians and prisoners. Still, I'm hoping you'll stop by the home of Mike Aichenbaum. He lives in Bryn Mawr, just 5 miles from St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, where you'll be staying during your visit.
NEWS
May 22, 2015
AGREAT MANY people who have a giving heart, and unfortunately they are frequently the targets of scammers. In an astounding case announced this week, the Federal Trade Commission and law-enforcement officials from every state and the District of Columbia have charged four cancer charities with bilking donors out of $187 million between 2008 and 2012. The case is the largest action of its type involving charity fraud, said Jessica Rich, director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection, at a news conference.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The guests of honor at the St. Christopher's Hospital for Children "prom" hit the red carpet on Saturday well after the paparazzi - staff, family members, and a few professional photographers - had staked out key vantage points along the red velvet ropes. Finally, 55 children with cancer strode out or rolled in as their names were announced one by one. The girls wore frilly, shiny dresses. Most of the boys were in black suits. Little Liam, who had just turned 1, went first, in his father's arms.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alex Niles, 32, formerly of Yardley, a businessman who created clothing designed to provide comfort for cancer patients during treatment, died Wednesday, April 8, of gastric cancer at his mother's home in the Forest Hills section of New York City. Mr. Niles founded CureWear, a nonprofit that made clothing with a flap so an intravenous line could be hooked up to a medical port without requiring the wearer to undress. His own health crisis inspired Mr. Niles to make treatment "a little more comfortable for the chronically ill," his family said in a statement.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one would chide a bald chemo patient for making bad decisions about her hair. But a stranger told one of Beth Eaby-Sandy's cancer patients - a woman whose treatment had made her skin turn bright red - that she "really should wear sunscreen. " The patient, who already felt conspicuous, was upset, said Eaby-Sandy, a nurse practitioner who works with lung cancer patients at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The stranger was rude, no doubt, but her ignorance is understandable.
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