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Cancer Patients

NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fox Chase Cancer Center will become part of the Temple University Health System, officials announced Thursday. The combination, which is expected to close next summer, will join two prominent Philadelphia health-care institutions, both of which have faced fiscal difficulties lately. Temple, based in North Philadelphia, will get a nationally recognized research partner that could help it compete with other academic medical centers in the region. Fox Chase, which will keep its name, will get a bigger referral base for patients, room to expand at Temple's Jeanes Hospital next door, and a chance to save money as health-care reform further squeezes the dollars available for clinical care and research.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Angela Cordisco and Elisa Guida were young girls together, endlessly playing "Yesterday," "Twist and Shout," and other cherished Beatles 45s in the basement of Guida's Drexel Hill home, their lives stretched before them. Cordisco didn't know she would marry a guitar-playing doctor, raise three music-loving children, and make a home in Moorestown. Guida, always an artist, might have been surprised to learn that she would settle in Erie, start a jewelry business, and marry happily at 39. She didn't suspect she would battle breast cancer not once, but twice, and live to rock on. "In so many ways, music has bonded us for over 50 years," Cordisco said of the women's enduring friendship.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2011
DEAR ABBY: I have been battling breast cancer and have been blessed to have a lot of support from family, friends and some awesome medical providers. My husband's best friend and his wife socialize with us quite often, and the friendship is important to him. I recently celebrated a birthday and these friends had us over for a belated birthday dinner. They bought me beautiful flowers and a gift. The card attached made a joke about my "aging breasts," which she found quite funny. Abby, I had a mastectomy, which she knew about!
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Vernon Clark and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
Isaac Djerassi, 86, a medical researcher and clinician, died Saturday, Nov. 12, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of complications after surgery. Dr. Djerassi, who worked in the fields of hematology and oncology, played a key role in developing centrifuge and filtration techniques for platelet and white-cell transfusions to support aggressive cancer chemotherapy. He was born in Bulgaria and attended a Catholic French college there but was sent to a transit camp by the Nazis in 1943.
NEWS
October 3, 2011
Kathleen Coyne, director of Philadelphia's Cancer Support Community (formerly the Wellness Center), directed us to the most helpful groups, beginning with her own organization ( www.cancersupport-phila.org ) . Open to Options, a service of CSC, is a crucial tool for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The one-time, one-hour counseling session can be done in person or by phone to prepare a woman for the talks she'll have with her doctor to plan her treatment. The session "really lessens the distress and anxiety" of those first meetings with the doctor, said Coyne.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
BEFORE SHE got sick, Hannah Max was many things: stellar math and biology student, passionate horse rider, lover of sushi. Since her diagnosis with Stage IV, high-risk neuroblastoma - a rare and deadly childhood cancer that attacks the nervous system - the 13-year-old is now a medical trailblazer, too. And you, Daily News readers, are partially responsible for that. So thank you for what you've done, not just for Hannah but for other children in desperate need of cancer care in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2011
Cancer is a scary prospect, and we need all the help we can get to understand what it is, how it's treated, and how to cope with it. Some iPad tablet applications have risen to the task, or parts of it. A guide to 120 types of cancer is part of Cancer.net Mobile , from the American Society of Clinical Oncology. This free app has information about treatment, costs, and side effects, and helps patients and families manage life with cancer. Unfortunately, links to a video and podcast of "When the Doctor Says Cancer" were not working when we tested the app. Tools in the app let you log symptoms and side effects and note the questions that you need to take to the doctor's office, when you could be nervous and forget.
NEWS
August 22, 2011 | BY ROBERT GOLDBERG
SOMETIMES profound change happens so swiftly, it's unrecognized and unappreciated. Such is the case with the response to the federal Food and Drug Administration advisory committee's decision to withdraw agency approval for using Avastin to treat metastatic breast cancer. After the FDA Oncological Drug Advisory Committee declared Avastin to be unsafe and ineffective for women suffering from that incurable form of the disease, the headlines and pundits spun the decision - and the discussion - as one where science triumphed over emotional and desperate women.
NEWS
August 19, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leron S. Magilner told his 191 Facebook friends that he was dying of pancreatic cancer, which he said was spreading "like wildfire. " Friends and coworkers quickly organized benefits to help with his expenses. On Thursday, police said it was a fraud and charged the Havertown man with theft. He was being held at the Delaware County jail on $20,000 bail. In March, Magilner, 34, who worked at the Wooden Indian Tobacco Shop in Havertown, allegedly told coworkers he had months to live.
NEWS
August 15, 2011
Music, we can pretty much all agree, is a good thing. New research suggests that it can benefit cancer patients, too. A review of 30 previous trials involving 1,891 participants found that both formal music therapy and informal listening appeared to help reduce anxiety and pain, and improved quality of life for people with cancer. The analysis, published last week by the Cochrane Library, came with plenty of caveats. A key one is that virtually none of the studies were "blinded" - a gold standard of research, intended to prevent bias, in which participants don't know if they received an intervention.
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