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Cancer Patients

SPORTS
May 9, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
BY NOW, MOST people have heard of Matt Kemp's incredible act of kindness. On Sunday, after losing a game to the Giants in San Francisco, the Dodgers' centerfielder kept a promise to third-base coach Tim Wallach to sign an autograph for a fan. The fan turned out to be Joshua Jones, a 19-year-old from Tracey, Calif., who has inoperable tumors on his spine and only 3 months to live. Kemp first gave Jones an autographed ball. Then he removed his cap and handed it over, too. He then pulled his still-buttoned No. 27 jersey over his head and placed it on Jones' lap. Finally, he took off his Nikes and gave them to Jones.
NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time, the American Urological Association is discouraging many men from having prostate cancer screening, and encouraging those who do to consider the harms as well as benefits. In guidelines issued Friday, the association recommends against routine PSA testing for men before age 40 or after age 70, men of any age with a life expectancy of less than a decade, or average-risk men ages 40 to 54. Men 55 to 69, and younger men who are at high risk because of their race or family history, should go through "shared decision making" with their doctors to weigh the pros and cons of screening, and their individual values, the guidelines say. The advice puts the urologists' group - traditionally fervent defenders of the PSA test - more in step with the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.
NEWS
April 21, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The seventh child to receive an experimental leukemia therapy at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia got good news last week: It worked. "Avrey Walker is cancer free!!!! A total remission!" her father, Aaron, exulted on their Facebook page. The 9-year-old from Redmond, Ore., was diagnosed at age 4 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a blood cancer that can be deadly within a few months if not treated. Like other children in the study at Children's, Avrey had undergone years of intermittent chemotherapy, only to relapse each time the toxic treatments ended.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Few things in life are as anxiety-provoking as the diagnostic tests cancer patients endure every few months. A CT scan or an MRI can provide a reason to hope - or a death sentence. It's no wonder, then, that patients and their families feel "scanxiety" in the days leading up to tests, and again before getting results. Hearts race, palms sweat, and middle-of-the-night thoughts leap to worst-case scenarios. It doesn't have to be that way, says Gabriel Rocco, a contemplative counselor and meditation instructor.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2013 | By Dan Gross
CHEF/RESTAURATEUR Marc Vetri is recuperating from recent shoulder surgery and wore a sling on his tuxedoed arm at Saturday's Lemon Ball. Vetri and his partners, chef Jeff Michaud and Jeff Benjamin , were honored at the Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation event for their charity efforts through the Great Chefs Event. We hear that Vetri's telling friends the injury's just from getting older, but one suggests his jiu-jitsu training may be to blame. Vetri did not reply to our email Monday about the cause of the arm injury or whether it has affected his cooking.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kelly Mack and her family just returned from a weeklong, professionally planned, all-expenses-paid trip to Orlando. The best part of the vacation? "No one asked how I was doing," said Mack, a 42-year-old mother of three who spent the last year battling an aggressive and often fatal form of breast cancer. "No one knew, so no one asked. And it was nice. " Of course, 9-year-old Sean and 7-year-olds Brynn and Emily had their own favorites: The Buzz Lightyear ride at Walt Disney World.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
Young cancer patients who could not get a key medicine because of a national drug shortage were more likely to suffer a relapse than others who were able to get the preferred treatment, doctors report. It's the first evidence that a long-standing drug-supply problem probably has affected cancer treatment results in specific patients. The study involved more than 200 children and young adults with a blood cancer called Hodgkin lymphoma. Like childhood leukemia, it can be cured nearly 80 percent of the time.
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alice Hamilton was a 62-year-old widow suffering from terminal cancer in 2007 when she moved into a nursing home and asked her longtime Bensalem neighbor to handle her affairs. The neighbor, Virginia Marquardt, promptly obtained power of attorney for Hamilton and started spending her money. Marquardt, a former registered nurse, stole nearly $313,000 over the next 41/2 years, for everything from meals at local restaurants to trips to Las Vegas and Mexico, tickets for sporting events and a comedy hypnotist, payments for real estate taxes, and credit card late fees.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By Bridget Huber, FAIRWARNING
Lung cancer takes more lives than any other cancer. This year it will kill an estimated 160,340 Americans, more than breast, colon, and prostate cancers combined. Yet while lung cancer remains largely a death sentence - just 15.9 percent of those diagnosed are alive five years later - the federal government funds far less research on the disease than on other common cancers. The discrepancy is starkest when death rates are taken into account. In 2011, the two federal agencies providing most of the research money funded breast cancer research at a rate of $21,641 per death while spending $1,489 per lung cancer death.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just eight years ago, human egg freezing was an unproven, hit-or-miss, costly technology being hyped as a way to defy biological clocks. It's still expensive, but now, it works. On Wednesday, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, the professional organization of fertility specialists, declared that egg freezing should no longer be considered experimental because the rates of pregnancies - and healthy offspring - were comparable to using fresh eggs. That's a dramatic shift from 2004, when the society said egg freezing should be provided only as part of a research study, with strict oversight and at no charge, to patients with no other hope of having their own genetic children.
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