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Cancer Survivors

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NEWS
July 29, 2002 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a decision that promises breast-cancer victims more protection in the workplace, the New Jersey Appellate Division has ruled that mastectomy patients are amputees and therefore covered under the state's Law Against Discrimination. The ruling could aid other cancer survivors as well. Reversing a lower court's ruling, the three-judge appeals panel found that although a Monmouth County woman's cancer was in remission, she was protected under the antidiscrimination law. "The fact that she suffered no recurrence and that she had minimal limitations on her physical capabilities does not disqualify her from protection under the LAD," Judge Lorraine Parker wrote in the July 3 opinion.
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | By Eils Lotozo, Special to The Inquirer
Seven years ago, Marilyn Uchitel learned that the tumor in her knee was malignant. A few years later, there was a brush with breast cancer. But today Uchitel is doing fine. "You cry, then you go ahead and do what is recommended - the operation, the radiation. " Then, says Uchitel, "You re-evaluate your life and find out what's important. It isn't the car. It isn't the house. It's your child, your family. Then you think, 'What am I going to do with my life?' " For Uchitel, the answer was to begin volunteering at the Fox Chase Cancer Center.
NEWS
October 3, 2009 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Their friendship didn't get off to the easiest start. Phyllis Markoff was waiting in her oncologist's office for chemotherapy treatment when she noticed the scarf on the woman across from her, a woman also in her mid-30s named Emily Scattergood. Markoff asked where she bought it. "She just said, 'My sister got it for me.' I was wearing my wig and she didn't think I was a cancer patient so she was really put off," said Markoff, of Cherry Hill. "I was like, 'I'm going to the beach, and I don't want to go bald.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Marjorie Stromberg and Sean Miller decided to get married, they knew they might face fertility problems stemming from her chemotherapy for leukemia at age 12. The idea of fertility treatment didn't faze them. Parenthood was a cherished goal. They even had a name for a girl: Adele. What they couldn't foresee was that the prospect of pregnancy would become not just daunting, but unacceptably risky. In the months after their engagement in 2011, Marjorie, then 26, was diagnosed with breast cancer, as well as a rare genetic susceptibility to multiple cancers.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | By Marilou Regan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The American Cancer Society's statistics are grim - one in four people is likely to be diagnosed with cancer. But the good news that is more people are surviving cancer than ever before. Physicians today know more about how to fight the disease, and 4 1/2 million cancer survivors are proof that new treatments are working. But survivors can face prejudice in the workplace and discrimination by insurance companies, according to Susan Brown, a registered nurse and the administrative director of Crozer-Chester Medical Center's Regional Cancer Center.
NEWS
September 6, 1987 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
The applause began when the three tanned bicyclists were spotted approaching the Institute for Cancer Research at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. It rose in a crescendo as Eric Rock, Nina Cooper and Ginni Fleck pedaled beneath a welcoming banner. As the trio dismounted, they were greeted with flowers, balloons, hugs and kisses from supporters who had kept track of their 4,600-mile journey across the United States to raise money and support for the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship.
NEWS
September 27, 2001 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Susan Dallas-Feeney says she is going to feel "uplifted" when she struts across the small runway at QVC Studios on Saturday. The three-year survivor of breast cancer said that participating in the annual SHINE fashion show gave her "a sense of hope and strength. " This is the fourth time the West Chester family physician will model clothes and makeup at the event. SHINE, which stands for Salons Helping in Neighborhoods Everywhere, is sponsoring the fund-raising event for the Cancer Center of Chester County, a service of the Chester County Hospital, and the University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center.
SPORTS
July 9, 1998 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
A 100-kilometer (62-mile) bicycle ride isn't the way couch potatoes would spend a summer day. However, for Bob Ehlinger and thousands of others, Sunday's American Cancer Society ride from the Benjamin Franklin Bridge to Mays Landing, N.J., is a labor of love. Like many others who will make the ride, Ehlinger, 40, is a cancer survivor. The Abington High graduate was a junior at Gettysburg College when he was diagnosed with testicular cancer. Following his successful treatment, Ehlinger was asked by the American Cancer Society to speak to high school students about early detection of the disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1996 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Don't be put off by the admittedly off-putting title. The appeal of My Left Breast, the one-woman show that opened Wednesday at the Walnut Street Theatre Studio 3, is not limited to breast cancer survivors. Susan Miller, the likable playwright/performer of the piece, is after all much more than that - in her own words, a "one-breasted, menopausal, Jewish, bisexual, lesbian mom. " That covers a lot of territory. The starting point of Miller's hour-long dramatic monologue is indeed her cancer and mastectomy experience.
NEWS
October 26, 2006 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As loud rock music blared and celebrities watched from the front rows, Nancy Pelton and a few friends grasped the hands of designer-clad models and matched them step-for-step on the Frankie B runway. The women, all survivors of HER2-positive breast cancer, seemed nervous at first. By the time they reached the end of the catwalk, however, they were smiling and twirling, showing off made-up faces, and unveiling Frankie B's "HER2 Genes," a special line of denim to benefit a cancer organization.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Marjorie Stromberg and Sean Miller decided to get married, they knew they might face fertility problems stemming from her chemotherapy for leukemia at age 12. The idea of fertility treatment didn't faze them. Parenthood was a cherished goal. They even had a name for a girl: Adele. What they couldn't foresee was that the prospect of pregnancy would become not just daunting, but unacceptably risky. In the months after their engagement in 2011, Marjorie, then 26, was diagnosed with breast cancer, as well as a rare genetic susceptibility to multiple cancers.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
BEN BAKER never wastes time feeling sorry for himself. Not when an uncommon disease he'd had since childhood caused his liver to fail in 2012, just days shy of his 18th birthday. Not when he was diagnosed, less than two years after a lifesaving liver transplant, with a rare form of post-transplant lymphoma - and not when the cancer reared its ugly head a second time, just when his doctors thought he'd officially beaten it. Baker, 20, didn't even get down last week, after he hit a bump in the road and was lifelined to Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore to be treated for problems with his spleen from all the trauma his young body has taken.
NEWS
December 13, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Feeling at the very peak of health, Lynn Marks couldn't have been more surprised when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. "I was kind of blown away," she recalled. And with no connection to other breast-cancer patients, she felt isolated. Fifteen years later, Marks, 65, of Center City, the executive director of Pennsylvanians for Modern Courts, knows that others are literally in the same boat, specifically one that dates to ancient Chinese tradition. She is a member of a dragon-boat crew, Against the Wind, made up of breast-cancer survivors.
NEWS
July 6, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
David J. Baldwin, 50, of Northeast Philadelphia, former director of local advertising at The Inquirer, died Thursday, July 3, of colon cancer. "Everyone he met was a friend," said his wife, Joanne. "He would do anything for anybody. " Mr. Baldwin was passionate about his children and hockey. "My whole house is hockey, hockey, hockey," said Joanne Baldwin, whose family could always be found at a Flyers game. Mr. Baldwin didn't just attend games. He coached hockey at Archbishop Ryan High School in Philadelphia and served on the board of directors at the Parkwood Youth Organization, where he also coached soccer.
SPORTS
February 10, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Devin Smeltzer started writing the names under the bill of his baseball cap when he was 10 or 11. Some of them were other children with cancer. Some were survivors, like him. Some were gone. "Those are the people I play for," said Smeltzer, a senior at Bishop Eustace and one of the nation's most highly touted scholastic baseball players. With his live left arm, the 6-foot-3 Smeltzer can throw better than 90 m.p.h. He was 8-3 with a 1.77 ERA and 109 strikeouts for Bishop Eustace last season.
SPORTS
May 30, 2013 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rob Long's hand combed through his hair, and he dipped his head when he reached the back. "It's all titanium back here," Long said, spreading the strands of his light brown hair. And there it was. A four-inch scar - in the shape of an S - left behind from brain surgery that drained the former star athlete of his energy and tried its best to dash his NFL dream. A day after Long turned 22 in 2010, a surgeon opened up his skull with a drill and removed a brain tumor the size of a tennis ball.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
NEW YORK - If you've ever fired up your computer and cringed in anticipation of what nasty e-mails await, pity Eve Ensler. The Tony Award-winning playwright and activist gets a daily record sent to her of atrocities against women - a never-ending drumbeat of rape, genital mutilation, imprisonment, and murder. "In my inbox on any given day, I can tell you every single story of any violation that's happening to women anywhere in the world," Ensler says. "It's horrifying. My inbox is like a nightmare.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
To know Brenda Jones is to get hugged by her. What happens next, often, is you want to send her some fabric. She's the breast-cancer battler I wrote about three years ago whose anger at getting sick found a juicy target in those hideous, backless Johnny coats that hospitals make their patients wear. As she was recovering from radiation treatment, she learned to sew, well enough to start producing fanciful flannel gowns she calls Hug Wraps. She'd given away about 150 of them to fellow cancer patients when I first visited her home in Southampton, N.J., on the edge of the Pine Barrens.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
Through Oct. 17, Philly.com and The Inquirer will mark breast cancer awareness month by publishing a profile a day of transformative moments reported by patients. The series will culminate in a special Philly.com/Inquirer/Daily News section on Oct. 18, and can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer . Lisa Barsky is a school psychologist and teacher in Bala Cynwyd. This is her story: "The most difficult moments for me in my delicate dance (not battle) with breast cancer were also the ones that were most transformative.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
Dubbed a "medical anomaly" by his doctors, 21-year-old Alexander Rotzal has fought the odds of survival from the moment he was born. His severely underdeveloped heart, an often fatal birth defect, has had him in and out of hospitals for his entire life. At age 2, Alex had a life-prolonging heart operation. Every few years, to keep his heart functioning normally, he still needed an extra metal part here and there, including a pacemaker. This summer, while other college students worked on their tans or vacationed abroad, Alex battled cancer and beat it back.
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