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Cancer Vaccine

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NEWS
February 20, 2007 | DEBORAH LEAVY
IGENERALLY don't trust government. It can be a force for good but too often mucks it up, especially lately. And I'm pro-choice, favoring autonomy in decisions about reproductive health and sexuality. So I was suspicious when I heard that Texas was ordering mandatory vaccination of 11- and 12-year-old girls for the human papilloma virus (HPV), which causes a sexually transmitted infection that can lead to cervical cancer. Many other states are considering doing the same. Preventing cancer certainly sounds like a worthwhile idea, but should the vaccine be mandatory?
LIVING
May 29, 2000 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas Jefferson University researchers are encouraged by positive results from early testing of custom-made vaccines to treat ovarian cancer and melanoma. Both types of vaccines are made from the patient's own cancer cells. The modified cells appear foreign to the body's immune system, which reacts against them. In early testing involving 10 ovarian cancer patients with advanced stages of disease that had not responded to chemotherapy, one patient's ovarian cancer disappeared after the six weekly vaccine injections.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A vaccine against cervical cancer, being developed by Inovio Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Blue Bell, produced positive results in a small sample of 18 women. The vaccine prompted their bodies to produce T cells - a type of white blood cell - that, in a separate lab test, recognized cells with tumor proteins and killed them. The researchers, including a team from the University of Pennsylvania, say the paper in the journal Science Translational Medicine is the first to show that a DNA vaccine alone produced a high level of immunity in people.
NEWS
March 26, 2006
Sex can give you cancer. Well, not exactly. But a specific sexually transmitted disease - human papillomavirus (HPV) - has been found to cause cervical cancer. That being the case, one would think a new vaccine that prevents cervical cancer would be universally hailed. But the fact that the drug is most effective when administered to children has made it controversial. Some family values groups worried that promiscuity might increase if adolescents knew they'd been vaccinated to ward off a sexually transmitted disease.
NEWS
April 28, 1996 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As soon as Mary Prolejko's cancerous tumor was removed in surgery, her daughters rushed it to a hospital 30 miles away. At Thomas Jefferson University, a laboratory technician processed the melanoma tumor and divided the cells into vials for freezing. Several weeks later, Prolejko, 73, was given a shot containing about 7 1/2 million of the tumor cells, which had been specially prepared so they could no longer reproduce. The hope was that the very cells that caused her cancer might now keep it from coming back.
NEWS
June 5, 2007 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Having lost an uncle to prostate cancer, and now, watching his father's losing battle, Ed Gorkes cannot understand why the government is keeping a breakthrough therapy in limbo. The 51-year-old Horsham businessman and other prostate cancer activists are outraged that the Food and Drug Administration last month demanded more proof that Provenge works, even though the agency's own advisory panel voted overwhelmingly for immediate approval. Yesterday about 100 activists from 19 organizations rallied in Washington.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | By Andrea Knox and Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Now that the stock market's nosedive has smashed all the rose-tinted glasses, the future is looking decidedly more bleak for many Internet, software and biotechnology companies. The new "new economy" is shaping up as a place of canceled stock-market offerings, increased hesitation among private funders, and corporate knuckle-biting about whether to reprice stock options, which is expensive, or risk losing valuable employees to companies with better options deals. Companies that were astute enough to bulk up their coffers when money was flowing freely have the best chance to escape unscathed, said Robert M. McCord, president and chief executive officer of the Eastern Technology Council, a group representing 700 area technology firms.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2011
In the Region Deb Shops gets OK for asset sale Deb Shops Inc., a bankrupt Philadelphia retailer of clothing for teenage girls and young women, won approval Tuesday from a bankruptcy court in Wilmington to sell its assets to lenders who were owed $75 million, after no competing offers were received. With no other bids, Deb canceled an Aug. 31 auction. Lee Equity Partners L.L.C., the private equity firm that bought Deb in 2007, is part of the purchasing group and will own 3 percent of the new equity, said Damon P. Meyer, a lenders' spokesman.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2002 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Microbiologist Yvonne Paterson and a team of University of Pennsylvania scientists have toiled in labs for 12 years on a genetically engineered vaccine they believe has commercial promise to treat human cancers. In 1995, after documenting that the live bacteria vaccine prevented and reduced cancer tumors in animals, Paterson tried to interest pharmaceutical companies in developing a new drug based on the technology. But industry officials declined, saying they wanted to see more tests that prove the vaccine works in people.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A vaccine against cervical cancer, being developed by Inovio Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Blue Bell, produced positive results in a small sample of 18 women. The vaccine prompted their bodies to produce T cells - a type of white blood cell - that, in a separate lab test, recognized cells with tumor proteins and killed them. The researchers, including a team from the University of Pennsylvania, say the paper in the journal Science Translational Medicine is the first to show that a DNA vaccine alone produced a high level of immunity in people.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2011
In the Region Deb Shops gets OK for asset sale Deb Shops Inc., a bankrupt Philadelphia retailer of clothing for teenage girls and young women, won approval Tuesday from a bankruptcy court in Wilmington to sell its assets to lenders who were owed $75 million, after no competing offers were received. With no other bids, Deb canceled an Aug. 31 auction. Lee Equity Partners L.L.C., the private equity firm that bought Deb in 2007, is part of the purchasing group and will own 3 percent of the new equity, said Damon P. Meyer, a lenders' spokesman.
NEWS
September 13, 2011
GlaxoSmithKline said Tuesday that it would donate $1 million worth of cervical cancer vaccine to a new partnership launched by former president George W. Bush and aimed at reducing deaths from women's cancers. GSK makes Cervarix, says it also will provide $50,000 to support the program operations and that more than 10,000 girls and women will have access to vaccination. The Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon partnership is a new initiative led by the George W. Bush Institute, the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, Susan G. Komen for the Cure and the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS.
NEWS
August 19, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years after the world's first cervical-cancer vaccine was hailed as a public-health breakthrough, Gardasil is facing renewed questions about its safety and value. In today's Journal of the American Medical Association, federal researchers analyze 12,424 voluntary reports of post-vaccination "adverse events" ranging from headaches to deaths. They conclude that only two complaints - fainting and dangerous blood clots -- are more common than expected and may be related to the immunization.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Becky Batcha, Daily News staff writer
Beverly Lybrand Vice president and general manager for adolescent and adult vaccines at Merck & Co. in West Point, Montgomery County. The story so far: Merck's Gardasil vaccine, which debuted last year, prevents the sexually transmitted disease HPV, which can lead to cervical cancer. The problem is that the vaccine is administered to girls. The recommended age for starting the three-shot vaccine is 11 or 12 years old. Some opponents say giving STD shots to pre-teens encourages promiscuity.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007
Beverly Lybrand   Vice president and general manager for adolescent and adult vaccines at Merck & Co. in West Point, Montgomery County. The story so far: Merck's Gardasil vaccine, which debuted last year, prevents the sexually transmitted disease HPV, which can lead to cervical cancer. The problem is that the vaccine is administered to girls. The recommended age for starting the three-shot vaccine is 11 or 12 years old. Some opponents say giving STD shots to pre-teens encourages promiscuity.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2007 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Merck & Co. Inc. said yesterday that it would donate three million doses of its new cervical-cancer vaccine Gardasil to the developing world. The gift would be enough to help protect three million women, said Margaret G. McGlynn, president of Merck Vaccines & Infectious Disease, speaking at the Clinton Global Initiative in New York. Merck executives estimated the gift's value at $375.5 million, based on U.S. prices. They said they would give up to three million doses of Gardasil to a nongovernmental organization that would review proposals from groups in developing countries.
NEWS
June 5, 2007 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Having lost an uncle to prostate cancer, and now, watching his father's losing battle, Ed Gorkes cannot understand why the government is keeping a breakthrough therapy in limbo. The 51-year-old Horsham businessman and other prostate cancer activists are outraged that the Food and Drug Administration last month demanded more proof that Provenge works, even though the agency's own advisory panel voted overwhelmingly for immediate approval. Yesterday about 100 activists from 19 organizations rallied in Washington.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2007 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The race for prestige and profits in cervical-cancer vaccines intensified yesterday when GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. formally asked U.S. regulators to approve its vaccine, Cervarix. The long-expected application to the Food and Drug Administration - for use in adolescent girls and possibly young women - puts Cervarix at least 16 months behind Merck & Co. Inc., maker of Gardasil. Cervarix has been tested and prepared for market partly at GlaxoSmithKline facilities in Upper Merion and Philadelphia, part of the U.S. headquarters of the London-based company.
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