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Cancer

NEWS
February 10, 1986 | By MIKE SANTANGELO, New York Daily News
Marilyn Klinghoffer, 58, who became a reluctant international celebrity when terrorists pitched her wheelchair-bound husband off the hijacked Achille Lauro cruise ship, died yesterday after a long battle with cancer. Klinghoffer, who lived on the lower East Side, died about 5 a.m. at Lenox Hill Hospital, where she had been for the last two weeks, said family spokeswoman Letty Simon. The cancer had been diagnosed in the fall of 1984, Simon said, but declined to identify the type of cancer.
SPORTS
August 11, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, who is now leading the investigation into steroid use by baseball players, has treatable prostate cancer, according to his New York law firm. "The cancer is small, low grade, and localized, and can be effectively treated and cured," Mitchell's doctor, Harvey Klein, said in a statement released by the firm. "The prognosis is very good. " Mitchell, 73, said the diagnosis and treatment will not affect his baseball probe. "The investigation, which is in its final phases, will be completed in the coming months and neither the substance nor the timing of the report will be affected in any way," he said in the statement.
SPORTS
January 25, 1997 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nine days after undergoing surgery for prostate cancer, Arnold Palmer said that he was a little sore and uncomfortable, but that he was cancer-free and hoping to return to competitive golf. "I feel relatively good," Palmer, 67, said yesterday during a news conference at Bay Hill Golf Club, where he spends much of the year. "I won't tell you there's not some discomfort. And by late afternoon or evening, I get tired, which is difficult for me to handle. I'm just not used to that.
SPORTS
September 7, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
After two operations for cancer and 32 radiation treatments, Brett Butler last night made good on his promise to return to the Los Angeles Dodgers - and slapped a fifth-inning single to left in his third at-bat. His wife, Eveline, smiled and clapped as her husband became the first Dodger to race onto the field and took his position in center against the Pittsburgh Pirates. In the top of the first, he caught a fly by Mike Kingery for the final out. A standing ovation delayed Butler's first at-bat.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: I'm a 35-year-old female diagnosed with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. I've recently had 14 polyps removed from my small intestine, all of which were benign. My doctor tells me this syndrome produces a higher incidence of certain types of cancer. Can you fill in the blanks? A: Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is an uncommon inherited tendency to polyps, or benign growths, in the small intestine and stomach. Patients with this congenital disorder often exhibit areas of bluish-black discoloration in and around the mouth.
SPORTS
October 11, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Former European Ryder Cup captain Mark James has cancer and will undergo chemotherapy. The 46-year-old Englishman has withdrawn from the next five tournaments on the European Tour. "I have been diagnosed with lymphoma and, pending further tests, expect to be starting chemotherapy soon," James said yesterday. "I would be grateful if the media would respect my privacy at this time. " Lymphoma is cancer of the lymphatic system, which conveys electrolytes, water, proteins and other fluids into the blood stream.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Jean Rupertus remembers two things about her visits to Chris Colfer's home. First, she recalls the tenacity of the young brain cancer patient from Bridesburg. "He had so much courage and so much will to live that he defied the doctors' predictions," said Rupertus, principal at All Saints Parish School, where Chris was a fifth grader. "He hated having cancer. He hated the disease, and I don't think he ever gave up until the very end. " Second, she remembers the boy's concern for others.
SPORTS
January 2, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Bobbi Olson, the wife of Arizona basketball coach Lute Olson for 47 years, died yesterday in Tucson after a 2 1/2-year battle with ovarian cancer. She was 65. Her husband has been on an indefinite leave of absence since Saturday to be with her and was by her side, along with other family members. Lute and Bobbi Olson have five children and 13 grandchildren. In other college basketball news: Utah coach Rick Majerus was admitted to a hospital after experiencing chest pains.
SPORTS
February 28, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services (Staff writer John Lowe contributed to this article.)
Hall of Famer Jacques Plante, 57, who introduced the goaltender's mask to modern hockey, died yesterday at Geneva Cantonal Hospital in Geneva, Switzerland, a few weeks after he learned he had inoperable stomach cancer. Mr. Plante, one of the mainstays of the Montreal Canadiens when they won a record five straight Stanley Cups, was admitted to the hospital last week for treatment of the cancer. At the time of his death, he was working for the St. Louis Blues as a goaltending instructor.
SPORTS
October 13, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo's father has been diagnosed with prostate cancer. "You just love your dad, you want him to be all right," Romo said yesterday. "It's just part of getting older, and it happens to a lot of people. So, it's just another step in the path of life. " Ramiro Romo, 50, found out he had cancer just days after he and his wife were in Chicago watching their son throw for 329 yards and two touchdowns in a 34-10 victory over the Bears. They will be at Texas Stadium tomorrow when the Cowboys play New England in a matchup of 5-0 teams.
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