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Candy Corn

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NEWS
November 3, 1994 | By Andrew Metz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The hospital was the last place kids in Doylestown wanted to be Monday night. But that's where Princess Jasmine ended up. And that's where many other young trick-or-treaters finished their Halloween candy raids as well. For witches, hippies, and parents of Power Rangers, the trick this Halloween came from four radiologic technologists, poised to X-ray the visitors' bursting bags of treats and allay concerns about razors, pins or needles lodged in the goodies. Although Doylestown Hospital has been doing it for years, screening Halloween candy is a dwindling practice.
FOOD
September 30, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
Blue patooties & martinis Congrats to Chef Anthony Arbeeny for his clever potato bar menu at the Park Hyatt Philadelphia at the Bellevue. High atop the hotel in the gorgeous, domed Ethel Barrymore Room on the 19th floor, you can sip martinis and nibble on the most innovative late-night nosh. When? Fridays and Saturdays, from 10 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. What, exactly? Whipped Peruvian blue potatoes, served in martini glasses with your choice of topping - salmon caviar, Tobiko caviar, truffles in oil, smoked salmon, creme fraiche, red onion, chives or tomatoes - for a reasonable $6 per glass.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Has income inequality exacerbated the financial crisis or slowed a recovery? How should "fairness" be addressed? The issue has many facets in this election year and needs to be sorted out. "Breaking down the income gap into real terms," at money.usnews.com, gives the income gap historical perspective, with notes on a so-called "great compression" of the income scale for decades after the Great Depression, and the subsequently unfolding "great divide"...
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | by Bernardo Ruiz
This year, I will not be celebrating Halloween. I have decided that a celebration from my culture - Day of the Dead - is a more sober and promising event. I plan to salute the lives of those who came before me, instead of just filling up on candy corn and scary movies. The Mexican celebration of Day of the Dead has long been misunderstood in the United States. Because it occurs so close to Halloween - on Nov. 2 - it has often been confused with the U.S. holiday. Though both Halloween and the Day of the Dead are outgrowths of Roman Catholic holy days, they are quite different.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | By Clare Aigner, Special to The Inquirer
Halloween is back in style, its reputation untarnished by past reports of sabotage with razor blades and poison. The candy industry, already selling more than $8 billion in candy yearly, expects 1990 to be the sweetest sales year yet. "Halloween is our single biggest candy consumption period. You have to have candy in the house at Halloween, unlike Christmas or Easter, which you can ignore if you choose," said Frank Puleo, a buyer for the Genuardi's supermarket chain. The National Confectioners Association said per-capita candy consumption was 19.8 pounds last year - 3.7 pounds more than in 1980.
FOOD
October 30, 2002 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
When it comes to favorite Halloween foods, the subject quickly turns to sweets and treats. There may be a traditional pot of chili on the stove or a seasonal pork roast with apples in the oven. But what comes to mind first when we think of Halloween are bags brimming with assorted candy loot, caramel- and candy-coated apples, and candy corn. Pat Ciarrocchi - coanchor of KYW-TV's Eyewitness News at noon and 5 p.m. and one of our town's most respected broadcast journalists - admits to a craving for the tricolored kernels.
NEWS
October 19, 2007 | By Joy Deangdeelert Cho, For the Inquirer
Put the house into frightening form for Halloween with this scary stuff. Our night to haunt and howl is less than two weeks away! Set these mini-totes ($12 for 2) all around, filled with candy and other goodies. Available at www.williams-sonoma.com (online/catalog sales only). Let this glowing grapevine pumpkin ($10) greet visiting ghouls. Sold at Target stores; see www.target.com for availability. John Derian's Trademark paperweight ($60) puts the eerie fun deskside.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | By Clare Aigner, Special to The Inquirer
No Ninja Turtle costume for Michael Mundt. And the Batman suit his grandmother sewed for him last year won't do, either. Nope, the 5-year-old Doylestown boy will canvass his Regency Woods neighborhood this Halloween as a police officer, with hopes of being treated with plenty of Tootsie Rolls, his favorite candy. Michael's mom, Lisa, is amazed at the number of trick-or-treaters who come through her neighborhood. "There must be hundreds in this development alone - it's a big event," she said.
NEWS
October 30, 1993 | By CAREN LISSNER
Few feelings in childhood can rival that of the anticipation of Halloween. There are the signs of its approach - the cool, blustery mornings, the bright orange and brown decorations on neighbors' doors and the candy corn packets piled like sandbags near the express lanes of supermarkets. There is the costume hunting and the strategic mapping of the trick-or- treat route. Then comes the fruit of the trick-or-treat labor: the treat. That's what the hordes of ghosts and goblins are after.
FOOD
October 28, 1992 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Shopping for Halloween candies leaves parents torn between selecting the sweets the youngsters like best and those that are best (would you believe better?) for them. We can be grateful that some of the sweets most closely linked to our modern rites of Halloween do count a bit lower in calories and fat than is the candyland norm. Among these are sugary treats such as candy corn, jelly beans, fruit-flavored gelatin pieces and hard candies. More healthful choices are traditional treats - apples, dried fruits, popcorn and gingersnaps.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
    CARAMEL apples are a staple of the Halloween season, but Cherry Hill resident June MacCarthy goes a step beyond the well-known "recipe" of unwrapping and melting bagged caramels. "If we are going to eat treats, I like to know what the ingredients are instead of a bunch of chemicals I can't pronounce," MacCarthy said. MacCarthy has taken cooking classes with her 9-year-old daughter, Abigail, at Haddonfield's In the Kitchen Cooking School. That's where they learned to make caramel from scratch.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Has income inequality exacerbated the financial crisis or slowed a recovery? How should "fairness" be addressed? The issue has many facets in this election year and needs to be sorted out. "Breaking down the income gap into real terms," at money.usnews.com, gives the income gap historical perspective, with notes on a so-called "great compression" of the income scale for decades after the Great Depression, and the subsequently unfolding "great divide"...
NEWS
October 19, 2007 | By Joy Deangdeelert Cho, For the Inquirer
Put the house into frightening form for Halloween with this scary stuff. Our night to haunt and howl is less than two weeks away! Set these mini-totes ($12 for 2) all around, filled with candy and other goodies. Available at www.williams-sonoma.com (online/catalog sales only). Let this glowing grapevine pumpkin ($10) greet visiting ghouls. Sold at Target stores; see www.target.com for availability. John Derian's Trademark paperweight ($60) puts the eerie fun deskside.
FOOD
October 30, 2002 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
When it comes to favorite Halloween foods, the subject quickly turns to sweets and treats. There may be a traditional pot of chili on the stove or a seasonal pork roast with apples in the oven. But what comes to mind first when we think of Halloween are bags brimming with assorted candy loot, caramel- and candy-coated apples, and candy corn. Pat Ciarrocchi - coanchor of KYW-TV's Eyewitness News at noon and 5 p.m. and one of our town's most respected broadcast journalists - admits to a craving for the tricolored kernels.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | by Bernardo Ruiz
This year, I will not be celebrating Halloween. I have decided that a celebration from my culture - Day of the Dead - is a more sober and promising event. I plan to salute the lives of those who came before me, instead of just filling up on candy corn and scary movies. The Mexican celebration of Day of the Dead has long been misunderstood in the United States. Because it occurs so close to Halloween - on Nov. 2 - it has often been confused with the U.S. holiday. Though both Halloween and the Day of the Dead are outgrowths of Roman Catholic holy days, they are quite different.
LIVING
November 1, 1998 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even though the world spins on an axis, symmetry is overrated. And consistency, as we all know, is the hobgoblin of little stomachs. So why should there be balance in our lives? Life is tilted. The calendar is screwy. More to the point, it's weighted. Starting this very day. November and December exist to literally tip the scales. From here on in, we will feast off the fat of the land. April is the cruelest month. These are the cruller months. From now on, we're in the the Waistland.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Halloween is upon us, so it's now time for us to get officially scared. Of course, there are other, more scary times of the year. April 15. When Mayor Rendell takes his annual summer dip, shirtless, into a city swimming pool. When the Eagles take the field each week. But none of them has candy corn, and at no other time of the year are there 20 - count' em 20 - really scary things for you to do or see on a given weekend. Some of what follows falls into the Halloween tradition of haunted houses, hayrides and dungeons.
FOOD
September 30, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
Blue patooties & martinis Congrats to Chef Anthony Arbeeny for his clever potato bar menu at the Park Hyatt Philadelphia at the Bellevue. High atop the hotel in the gorgeous, domed Ethel Barrymore Room on the 19th floor, you can sip martinis and nibble on the most innovative late-night nosh. When? Fridays and Saturdays, from 10 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. What, exactly? Whipped Peruvian blue potatoes, served in martini glasses with your choice of topping - salmon caviar, Tobiko caviar, truffles in oil, smoked salmon, creme fraiche, red onion, chives or tomatoes - for a reasonable $6 per glass.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | By Andrew Metz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The hospital was the last place kids in Doylestown wanted to be Monday night. But that's where Princess Jasmine ended up. And that's where many other young trick-or-treaters finished their Halloween candy raids as well. For witches, hippies, and parents of Power Rangers, the trick this Halloween came from four radiologic technologists, poised to X-ray the visitors' bursting bags of treats and allay concerns about razors, pins or needles lodged in the goodies. Although Doylestown Hospital has been doing it for years, screening Halloween candy is a dwindling practice.
NEWS
October 30, 1993 | By CAREN LISSNER
Few feelings in childhood can rival that of the anticipation of Halloween. There are the signs of its approach - the cool, blustery mornings, the bright orange and brown decorations on neighbors' doors and the candy corn packets piled like sandbags near the express lanes of supermarkets. There is the costume hunting and the strategic mapping of the trick-or- treat route. Then comes the fruit of the trick-or-treat labor: the treat. That's what the hordes of ghosts and goblins are after.
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