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Candy Factory

ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
Derrick Beckles was not particularly happy working in the television industry. "I would just come home and want to brush my teeth with a shotgun," Beckles said. To abate thoughts of dental hygiene-by-firearm, Beckles would transform himself into Pinky Carnage, the mad, splicing scientist behind "TV Carnage," a series of DVD mix-tapes culling the most wacked-out clips from all corners of the television landscape. " 'TV Carnage' is like a head enema," Beckles said. Tonight he's bringing the live iteration of "TV Carnage" to International House.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA If mixed religious metaphors be heresy, so be it. For more than a century, Shane's candy shop at Second and Market Streets has been Mecca during the weeks leading up to Easter. We are talking Easter candy here, brothers and sisters. A sacred rite of spring. Let us not question the holiness of hollow chocolate bunnies and the divine inspiration of coconut cremes. Generations of indulgent parents and their bug-eyed kids have made the trip to the old factory building with the curved stained-glass windows, anticipating that first hallelujah whiff of warm sugar and chocolate.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A heated, computer-controlled nozzle glided smoothly back and forth, then up and down, depositing a thin trail of sugar in the shape of a delicate, miniature cage. A scene from a high-tech pastry kitchen? A 21st-century reboot of Willy Wonka's candy factory? Far from it. The sugar cage was a first step toward manufacturing blood vessels for artificial organs, made with a custom-built 3-D "printer" in a bioengineering lab at the University of Pennsylvania. Once they harden, these crisscrossing lines of sugar can be surrounded with a gel that contains cells from the desired type of organ - say, a liver.
NEWS
October 28, 1991 | By Christopher Cornell, Special to The Inquirer
Not one, not two, but three Halloween specials are on tap tonight, and while none of them look like something you'd want to tape for posterity, they're sure to serve as halfway decent time-killers. Even if they're not your cup of tea, first-run episodes of Murphy Brown and Northern Exposure mean the evening won't be a total loss. SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE HALLOWEEN SPECIAL (8-9 p.m., Channel 3) - The approach of Halloween gives NBC another chance to trot out more classic footage from the long-running comedy/variety series - this time with an emphasis on the macabre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | By Gene Seymour, Daily News Television Critic
Did the Mertzes and the Ricardos ever get trapped in the Mojave Desert? Did Lucy ever burn a house down by accident? Did she and Ethel ever end up at Birdland disguised as a cow? After a while, it gets like this. Trying to recall memorable scenes from "I Love Lucy" leads to a black-and-white blur of elaborate goofs and improbable gags. Even if the examples cited above never happened (and they didn't . . . at least, I think they didn't), they sound as if they should have happened.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
One day a week, Maryann Rzepski's job with the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District is a piece of cake. Or, more precisely, 500 pieces of cake, 41 dozen cookies or about 1,000 muffins. Every Tuesday, beginning at 7:30 a.m., Rzepski spends her day in a corner of the Unionville High School cafeteria, baking. On the other days of the week, she is an art teacher at Chadds Ford Elementary School. Rzepksi, 36, began her baking job last month to supplement the approximately $12,000 she'll get this year for being a long-term substitute for the regular art teacher at Chadds Ford Elementary, who is on sabbatical this year.
NEWS
April 9, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Between my childhood, my husband's and my children's, we may have collectively seen the 1968 film version of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (based on Ian Fleming's book), whose national tour is currently parked at the Academy of Music, at least 100 times. And it's a telling detail that none of us can really articulate what went on in that film - something about a magic car, whistling lollipops, and, I don't know, maybe the Kaiser? - with its dark-cornered absurdism and plain old weirdness courtesy of Roald Dahl and Ken Hughes.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Everybody wants something for Valentine's Day - even if it's just a kiss on the cheek. Here are some ideas on what to give and where to get it. If you're going to do chocolates, don't just grab the nearest box from the corner store. Quality counts. Shane's, 110 Market St., has 75 different varieties from which to choose. The most popular one-pound box sells for $14.60. But if you want to go all out - and we don't suggest this - you can get the eight-pound, heart-shaped box with a stuffed animal for $149.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | The New York Post, San Francisco Chronicle and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Byko's birthday book Richard Gere acts 48; Channel 10's Vai Sikahema anchors 35. SATURDAY: Jazz drummer Mickey Roker keeps the beat at 65. SUNDAY: Eagles defensive end Greg Jefferson tackles 26; N. Philly state rep Benjamin Ramos votes 41. MONDAY: L&I Commissioner Fran Weston cites 43 She's 44 and six months pregnant, but Cyndi Lauper still just wants to have fun. All summer she's been touring the country as Tina Turner's opening act, and...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
Before we all start running around with little Bat wings on our clothing, Paramount is doing everything in its power to promote this weekend's big opening of "Star Trek V: the Final Frontier. " Starting Monday, you can rent 22 episodes of the animated version of "Star Trek" that aired Saturday mornings for two seasons on NBC in the early '70s. Each of the 11 animated "Star Trek Adventures" videos (Paramount Home Video, $12.95 each) consists of two 24-minute episodes from the series that aired four years after the original series was dropped from the NBC prime-time schedule.
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