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Candy Man

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NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene B. Goldenberg, 78, of Northeast Philadelphia, a former wholesale seafood dealer who later worked as a police officer for the Defense Department, died Wednesday, April 24, of complications of dementia at Sierra Oaks of Bensalem. Mr. Goldenberg was known throughout the city as "the Candy Man" because he always passed out candy - especially Goldenberg's Peanut Chews, a Philadelphia favorite made in the Northeast. Despite his name, he had no relation to the company. In the 1960s, Mr. Goldenberg founded Delaware Sea Food Co., a wholesale seafood dealership at the Food Distribution Center on Lawrence Street in South Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1991 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
HE IS: Sidney Rosenblatt. HE DOES: Candy-making. HE SUCCEEDS: By making employees feel important. After making his way down the bunny trail, Peter Cottontail probably stopped at Sidney Rosenblatt's workplace. There the bunny could see the making of more than five million chocolate Easter eggs this season - mixed, churned, filled with coconut or peanut butter, then packaged to await a home in some child's colorful, straw Easter basket. Being an Easter egg supplier is new for Rosenblatt, now the owner of S. Zitner Co., a 55-year-old, North Philadelphia-based candy factory.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1995 | by Jacqueline Love, Daily News Staff Writer
Forrest Gump might say you could tell a lot about a candy company by the kind of candy it makes. Where they've been and where they're going . . . Falcon Candy Co. sure hopes so. It wants a lot of people to find out about it by trying its latest offering: Forrest Gump candy. And it hopes it takes them far. Forrest Gump, the fourth-highest-grossing film in movie history, has spawned a variety of merchandising from cookbooks to hats. The Philadelphia-based company beat out five to six other companies to gain the licensing rights to make the candy.
NEWS
October 31, 1988 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Harold Platts is a modest, Southern-born gentleman. So, it's only at the end of a long conversation about his 88 years of candy-making, film-acting, boat-building and life's ups and downs that Platts casually drops a claim of historic importance. Asked if he'll be making candy apples in his tiny candy/bake shop on Lancaster Avenue for Halloween, Platts says, "Yes. You know, I originated them? I made the first candy apple. " Historians, take note. "It was 1919 in Savannah, Ga., I was making candy with a partner," Platts recalls.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
      Aunt Charlotte's Candies in Merchantville was so busy around the holidays that the "Candy Man" sometimes spent $300 a day entertaining his customers. C. Brooks Oakford kept his clientele happy asking children, their parents, and various customers to pick heads or tails. Then he flipped a fresh dollar bill that turned as it fluttered to the ground. Those who guessed the way it would land got to keep the bill. On Friday, Nov. 29, Mr. Oakford, 90, who lived most of his life in Merchantville, died of cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1989 | USA Today, the New York Daily News, and The Associated Press contributed to this report
WEDDING WELL Women of the world, raise your hankies high. On July 1, the world's most eligible playboy, Hugh Hefner, ties the knot with his centerfold bride-to-be, Kimberly Conrad. "Romantic dog that I am," says Hef, "the wedding will be at the wishing well where I proposed to her" - on the lush grounds at the Playboy Mansion in Los Angeles. According to Hefner, only a small group of family and friends will be invited to the early afternoon ceremony. But come evening the 63-year-old groom and his 26-year-old bride will host 200 to 400 guests at a lavish dinner-dance reception in a tent on grounds of his estate.
NEWS
May 18, 1990
Wednesday was a sad day for people who listen and clap and laugh. It brought the news that Sammy Davis Jr. - the sparkling can-do entertainer - had died after six decades of entertaining America in vaudeville, clubs, movies and television. And Jim Henson died on the same day, leaving behind his famous creations, the floppy, happy, moody, inspirational Muppets, the real-life/ make-believe stars of television's Sesame Street. With the sadness over the early passing of Mr. Henson at age 53, there is also some consolation in the reassurance that his marvelously funny and versatile creatures will live on on our TV screens, and in the hearts of the littlest among us, for scores of years to come.
NEWS
September 28, 1988 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
They're billing it as "The Ultimate Event" - this Sammy Davis Jr./ Liza Minnelli/ Frank Sinatra road show that set up shop at the Spectrum last night (and returns for a second engagement tonight at 8). Which makes last week's Sting/ Peter Gabriel/ Bruce Springsteen "Human Rights Now!" bash the penultimate event, I guess. But, as the 62-year-old Davis confessed in his opening set, he doesn't pay much attention to Top 40 radio these days. And judging from the ecstatic welcome that greeted each and every number in the trio's repertoire, the old songs were what this crowd turned out to hear.
SPORTS
October 11, 1992 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the bright spotlight of October baseball, some men rise above the masses to do things people remember forever. And then there is Candy Maldonado. Before yesterday, they didn't call the Blue Jays' plucky leftfielder "Mr. October. " They called him "Mr. 0-for-October. " The good news is, he has seen action in the playoffs six times since 1983. The bad news is, he has been one of the worst postseason hitters who ever lived. Going into yesterday, his career average in the playoffs and World Series was a ghastly .118 (8 for 68)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Imagine a lifesize cafe table and inlaid chair that look good enough to eat. Actually, they could be eaten. For this table and chair are made entirely of chocolate. Dark, rich chocolate, the kind you can never get enough of. And they're decorated with red, yellow, and green gum drops, jelly beans and jelly slices as a visual and tantalizing treat. This sweet display is part of "The Confectioner's Art," a traveling exhibit that opens at the Academy of Natural Sciences on Saturday and remains until Sept.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
      Aunt Charlotte's Candies in Merchantville was so busy around the holidays that the "Candy Man" sometimes spent $300 a day entertaining his customers. C. Brooks Oakford kept his clientele happy asking children, their parents, and various customers to pick heads or tails. Then he flipped a fresh dollar bill that turned as it fluttered to the ground. Those who guessed the way it would land got to keep the bill. On Friday, Nov. 29, Mr. Oakford, 90, who lived most of his life in Merchantville, died of cancer.
NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene B. Goldenberg, 78, of Northeast Philadelphia, a former wholesale seafood dealer who later worked as a police officer for the Defense Department, died Wednesday, April 24, of complications of dementia at Sierra Oaks of Bensalem. Mr. Goldenberg was known throughout the city as "the Candy Man" because he always passed out candy - especially Goldenberg's Peanut Chews, a Philadelphia favorite made in the Northeast. Despite his name, he had no relation to the company. In the 1960s, Mr. Goldenberg founded Delaware Sea Food Co., a wholesale seafood dealership at the Food Distribution Center on Lawrence Street in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
His "candy business" provided sweets aplenty for David Burry. He had posh homes, one in Kennett Square, Chester County, and another near the beach, in Stone Harbor, N.J. He owned a helicopter, a 1999 Mercedes Benz, a Land Rover Cruiser, fine artwork and a home fitness center. Now, his candy empire's gone to pay off creditors. Turns out, Burry was nothing more than a sweet-talking con artist. "He sweet-talked his way into $25 million," Assistant U.S. Attorney John J. Pease said yesterday after Burry was charged in federal court in Philadelphia with a $25 million swindle.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1995 | by Jacqueline Love, Daily News Staff Writer
Forrest Gump might say you could tell a lot about a candy company by the kind of candy it makes. Where they've been and where they're going . . . Falcon Candy Co. sure hopes so. It wants a lot of people to find out about it by trying its latest offering: Forrest Gump candy. And it hopes it takes them far. Forrest Gump, the fourth-highest-grossing film in movie history, has spawned a variety of merchandising from cookbooks to hats. The Philadelphia-based company beat out five to six other companies to gain the licensing rights to make the candy.
SPORTS
October 11, 1992 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the bright spotlight of October baseball, some men rise above the masses to do things people remember forever. And then there is Candy Maldonado. Before yesterday, they didn't call the Blue Jays' plucky leftfielder "Mr. October. " They called him "Mr. 0-for-October. " The good news is, he has seen action in the playoffs six times since 1983. The bad news is, he has been one of the worst postseason hitters who ever lived. Going into yesterday, his career average in the playoffs and World Series was a ghastly .118 (8 for 68)
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | by Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News
The title of "I Don't Buy Kisses Anymore" refers to the chocolate, not lip-planted, variety. This modestly budgeted, even more modestly imagined, love story can at least claim to be the first known example of diet romance. Beyond that, there's not an original idea on the table. Coupled with the film's below-sustenance levels of wit and insight, it makes for pretty thin entertainment. Jason Alexander, the sleazy lawyer in "Pretty Woman" and shlubby sidekick on TV's "Seinfeld," plays big baby Bernie Fishbine.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1991 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
HE IS: Sidney Rosenblatt. HE DOES: Candy-making. HE SUCCEEDS: By making employees feel important. After making his way down the bunny trail, Peter Cottontail probably stopped at Sidney Rosenblatt's workplace. There the bunny could see the making of more than five million chocolate Easter eggs this season - mixed, churned, filled with coconut or peanut butter, then packaged to await a home in some child's colorful, straw Easter basket. Being an Easter egg supplier is new for Rosenblatt, now the owner of S. Zitner Co., a 55-year-old, North Philadelphia-based candy factory.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
The Buddy Bar . . . A half-ounce chunk of pure chocolate that would make the finickiest of taste buds do backflips. Wrapped in foil and costing only a penny, it was one of the biggest bargains of the day. Buddy was conceived, molded, produced, and packed in an old brick building in Bridesburg. In the beginning, some people - like Uncle Meyer - said Buddy would be a flop. Like its namesake, however, the Buddy Bar enjoyed a long, healthy and profitable life. Bernhard "Buddy" Blumenthal - candy man extraordinaire - will be 80 in July.
NEWS
May 18, 1990
Wednesday was a sad day for people who listen and clap and laugh. It brought the news that Sammy Davis Jr. - the sparkling can-do entertainer - had died after six decades of entertaining America in vaudeville, clubs, movies and television. And Jim Henson died on the same day, leaving behind his famous creations, the floppy, happy, moody, inspirational Muppets, the real-life/ make-believe stars of television's Sesame Street. With the sadness over the early passing of Mr. Henson at age 53, there is also some consolation in the reassurance that his marvelously funny and versatile creatures will live on on our TV screens, and in the hearts of the littlest among us, for scores of years to come.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sammy Davis Jr., the Harlem kid whose dazzlingly versatile 60-year show- business career earned him the appellation "Mr. Entertainment," died of throat cancer yesterday at his Los Angeles home. Mr. Davis, 64, whose disease was diagnosed in September, underwent chemotherapy in the fall. In January, he sought treatment of a gum infection at Los Angeles' Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and doctors discovered a recurrence of the cancer. He was discharged from the hospital on March 13 to rest at home.
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