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Canned Heat

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NEWS
December 24, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
President Kennedy had been gunned down in Dallas in November, so a certain gloom already had been hanging over the holiday season of 1963. But in Philadelphia it was even worse. Those we now call "street people" or "the homeless" were falling like flies on Skid Row. Police cars were roaming the area around 8th and Vine streets, blaring a warning over loud speakers to avoid "canned heat. " The dying started two days before Christmas and ended on New Year's Eve with 31 deaths.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was one guy meditating, his legs crossed, his eyes closed, his long, gray ponytail hanging down his back. There was another guy wearing a caftan and selling incense. There was one woman with a bald head, a ring in her nose and a tattoo on her neck. There were eight dogs running loose, three hula hoops being spun around, five local bands scheduled to play, 17 people wearing tie-dyed T-shirts, and one poster urging the Congress to end militarism in El Salvador. All these people, dogs and things came together yesterday at 43d Street and Chester Avenue in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
Alternative is fast becoming a code word in music for second-rate. Why? Because the question always left unanswered is: "Alternative to what?" Debbie Gibson? Judas Priest? Blues Traveler, which performed Saturday night at the Tower Theater in Upper Darby, certainly does present an alternative to the aforementioned artists. But with a musical package that retreads the riffs of the early '70s, spins off on long pointless jams and trades in hippy-dippy imagery, Blues Traveler is as second-rate as they come.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Flies are pests, gross, and they spread disease. And now, they're on a rocket heading for space - and heading right at you, if you're wearing the 3-D glasses supplied at theaters where Fly Me to the Moon is showing. A gimmicky tale of a trio of Florida insects who join Apollo 11 astronauts Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins on their historic summer of '69 jaunt, Fly Me to the Moon claims to be the first-ever animated feature designed, created and produced entirely in 3-D. The script, however, appears to have been designed, created and produced entirely in 1-D: a mishmash of kidcentric antics, follow-your-dream cliches, and innocuously icky humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1989 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
The most enduring artists have a stylistic stamp that is as singular as a fingerprint. Take John Lee Hooker. Hooker is a master of the blues, but he has never been bound by the traditional 12-bar format. One of his albums is called Endless Boogie, a title that evokes the incantatory quality of his guttural, feverish performances. Thumping out a bare-bones rhythm on his guitar and singing in a voice as leathery as an old and empty wallet, Hooker performs as if his songs have no beginning and no end - just a big, fat, beguiling middle.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2007 | By David Hiltbrand FOR THE INQUIRER
I'd like to get in a positive frame of mind for the holiday. So in my pre-Thanksgiving column, let me get a few things off my chest that have really been annoying me on television. Starting with Fox's top NFL announcing team, the insufferable tandem of Joe Buck and Troy Aikman. Buck, who is Fox's man-for-all-seasons, its locker-room Ryan Seacrest, is what you get when you grow up on a steady diet of Bob Costas and arrogance pills. Former Cowboys QB Aikman always reminds me of the old marionette Knucklehead Smiff.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1994 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Cable channels in the Philadelphia area don't produce many shows of their own, except for sports, which makes Prism's Live From Rafters series doubly admirable. It's not only original, it's good. Live From Rafters, which airs every other week, will return at 10 p.m. tomorrow. The featured artist is Matt Sevier, a rock singer who played on the premiere on Oct. 8. The only bad thing about Live From Rafters is its deceitful title. This series is not live: It's videotaped. Asked how he could call his show live when it isn't, Prism promotions manager Harold Gronenthal said, "It's a good title.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
SEVERAL OUTDOOR, multi-day music festivals were held in the summer of '69, including, in our own back yard, the Atlantic City Pop Festival at the shore town's racetrack. All were celebrating a seismic explosion in conscious rock - music spirited by the Beatles, Bob Dylan and "the movements" (anti-war, civil rights, feminist, ecological, psychedelic) and proffered by the likes of Jefferson Airplane, Santana, Janis Joplin, the Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Canned Heat, Joe Cocker and the Band.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
John Lee Hooker, 80, the blues giant whose career making primal music driven only by his electric guitar, stomping foot and dark-alley voice stretched over six decades, died yesterday. Mr. Hooker died of natural causes as he slept at his home in Los Altos, Calif., south of San Francisco, said his agent, Mike Kappus. Born in the Mississippi Delta, the cradle of the blues, he developed a distinctive, droning style that bears little resemblance to those of his contemporaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Everybody knows the Woodstock Music & Art Fair was the biggest, most zeitgeist-defining of 1960s music festivals. But how good was the music, really? The 40th anniversary offers a chance to listen in more detail than ever before. That's thanks largely to Rhino Records' six-CD boxed set, Woodstock 40 Years On: Back to Yasgur's Farm (. 1/2), which means to capture the countercultural gestalt with highlights from (almost) all of the performers, including Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Sly & the Family Stone, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Santana, and Ravi Shankar.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 28, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The message Walter and Marie Trout have been waiting for since September finally arrived Sunday. We have a liver that looks to be a good match for Walter . By early Monday afternoon, Walter Trout - the international blues guitar star with South Jersey roots - was in an operating room at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. "The surgical nurse . . . let me know they're playing Walter's music" during the procedure, Marie wrote on her Facebook page, adding several hours later that the lead surgeon had told her: "Walter made it through the surgery with an A+. " She also wrote, "We are filled with thankfulness for this opportunity.
SPORTS
January 26, 2012
THE CONCEPT HAS been as unspoken these last few months as it is obvious: that the pressure will be on the 2012 Phillies in a way that it has never been before. Well, maybe not never. "One thing that I remember about our team was that we read how good we were," Larry Bowa was saying the other night, before the Reading Phillies' annual winter banquet.
SPORTS
April 25, 2011 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, fernanb@phillynews.com
As any number of NBA-stocked "Dream Teams" have demonstrated between the gold-medal-winning American Olympics squads in 1992 and 2008, winning championships is not just about having more superstars on your roster than the competition. Latest case in point: the Miami Heat, whose "Big Three" of Le-Bron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh are discovering that superior talent might not necessarily lift the South Beach multimillionaires to the string of NBA titles that so many presumed would be the case when Wade convinced his buddies to join him in creating an instant dynasty.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009
Live music and more, tonight through Thursday, compiled by Shaun Brady, Tom Di Nardo, James Johnson, Sara Sherr and Jonathan Takiff. POP . . . plus Robben Ford: He was identified first as a jazz guitarist (working with Miles Davis helped), then moved over to the rockin' blues. Today, Ford has one foot in each camp and is the better for it. Sellersville Theater, Main and Temple streets, Sellersville, 8:30 tonight, $29.50-$39.50, 215-257-5808, www.st94.com . The Shondes: "You never had the backbone to decide," blasts Louisa Solomon to a wishy-washy romancer on "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow," a song that sounds nothing like the Carole King ballad.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Everybody knows the Woodstock Music & Art Fair was the biggest, most zeitgeist-defining of 1960s music festivals. But how good was the music, really? The 40th anniversary offers a chance to listen in more detail than ever before. That's thanks largely to Rhino Records' six-CD boxed set, Woodstock 40 Years On: Back to Yasgur's Farm (. 1/2), which means to capture the countercultural gestalt with highlights from (almost) all of the performers, including Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Sly & the Family Stone, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Santana, and Ravi Shankar.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
SEVERAL OUTDOOR, multi-day music festivals were held in the summer of '69, including, in our own back yard, the Atlantic City Pop Festival at the shore town's racetrack. All were celebrating a seismic explosion in conscious rock - music spirited by the Beatles, Bob Dylan and "the movements" (anti-war, civil rights, feminist, ecological, psychedelic) and proffered by the likes of Jefferson Airplane, Santana, Janis Joplin, the Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Canned Heat, Joe Cocker and the Band.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Flies are pests, gross, and they spread disease. And now, they're on a rocket heading for space - and heading right at you, if you're wearing the 3-D glasses supplied at theaters where Fly Me to the Moon is showing. A gimmicky tale of a trio of Florida insects who join Apollo 11 astronauts Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins on their historic summer of '69 jaunt, Fly Me to the Moon claims to be the first-ever animated feature designed, created and produced entirely in 3-D. The script, however, appears to have been designed, created and produced entirely in 1-D: a mishmash of kidcentric antics, follow-your-dream cliches, and innocuously icky humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2007 | By David Hiltbrand FOR THE INQUIRER
I'd like to get in a positive frame of mind for the holiday. So in my pre-Thanksgiving column, let me get a few things off my chest that have really been annoying me on television. Starting with Fox's top NFL announcing team, the insufferable tandem of Joe Buck and Troy Aikman. Buck, who is Fox's man-for-all-seasons, its locker-room Ryan Seacrest, is what you get when you grow up on a steady diet of Bob Costas and arrogance pills. Former Cowboys QB Aikman always reminds me of the old marionette Knucklehead Smiff.
SPORTS
February 10, 2005 | By JIM NOLAN For the Daily News
The Richmond Spiders had everything going for them: a five-game winning streak, an undefeated home record against La Salle dating to 1957, and an arena that could have doubled as a sauna. "It was hot in here . . . and I thought that would be a real positive for us, to tell you the truth," Richmond coach Jerry Wainwright said. "They don't have a lot of people. " La Salle's seven-man rotation certainly broke a sweat, but did not wilt under a late Richmond surge and held off the Spiders, 76-68, in front of 4,333 at the Robins Center.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
John Lee Hooker, 80, the blues giant whose career making primal music driven only by his electric guitar, stomping foot and dark-alley voice stretched over six decades, died yesterday. Mr. Hooker died of natural causes as he slept at his home in Los Altos, Calif., south of San Francisco, said his agent, Mike Kappus. Born in the Mississippi Delta, the cradle of the blues, he developed a distinctive, droning style that bears little resemblance to those of his contemporaries.
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