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Cantata

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NEWS
November 8, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Brandywine Area Community Choir will present a benefit concert 7 p.m. Sunday at St. Joseph Roman Catholic Church, 338 Manor Ave., Downingtown. The concert will feature a patriotic cantata, America! A Pilgrim's Prayer, A Patriot's Dream. Donations to benefit the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund will be accepted. The choir, featuring 70 singers, has performed cantatas for more than 20 years. Premiere at Har Zion Har Zion Temple, 1500 Hagys Ford Rd., Penn Valley, will host the premiere of KINGS, a New York musical created by award-winning composer Elliot Weiss and author/lyricist Esta Cassway of Wyncote, at 7 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Once modern performers and listeners progress beyond the Bach and Handel zone of the baroque period, they must decide how much to take the scores at their word. Composing was an everyday activity in the 18th century, much of the music written to be heard only once. So, is Tempesta di Mare's scholarly reevaluation of Georg Telemann's 1765 secular cantata Ino , premiered this weekend in its season-closing concerts, a significant event in the history of a significant piece? Yes, but not necessarily because listeners were closer to the notes Telemann put on paper.
NEWS
April 22, 2004 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
She was a collage of many, seemingly irreconcilable, parts. During the nine-plus lives that were packed into her 55 years, Philadelphia philanthropist Anni Baker was a Las Vegas backup singer, a Broadway gypsy, an art-song recitalist, composer of her own operetta, and mastermind of a Renaissance fair in Upstate New York. Even before her voice was ruined by chemotherapy, she was one of Philadelphia's most active champions of new music, commissioning composers from Libby Larsen to Jennifer Higdon, appearing in the front row of new-music concerts, beaming at the performers underneath a broad-brimmed hat. Now, five years after her death from breast cancer, she is becoming a piece of her own, an hourlong cantata composed by Andrea Clearfield titled The Long Bright, which will be premiered on Monday at the Kimmel Center by the combined Orchestra 2001, the Temple University Children's Prep Choir, and soprano Hila Plitmann.
NEWS
May 18, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In Specimen Days, Walt Whitman, the jubilant celebrator of himself and ourselves, departed from his effusive poetic stance to reflect leanly, often journalistically and poignantly, on the great experiences of his life. The profoundest of these was the time he spent nursing the sick and dying in Civil War camps and hospitals. In more than 600 visits, during which he encountered thousands of wounded and ill, Whitman sometimes stayed all night with critical cases "as sustainer of spirit and body in some degree in time of need.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It seems an unlikely place for a performance: three deep, concrete trenches, aqua- and ochre-streaked walls, a slightly ribbed, concrete ceiling. Ancient graffiti is scrawled along the trench walls - 1977, ZEP, ROO, MIK, JIM. Decayed paint is largely scraped away. A turbulent river roils just outside arched windows. Yet, this is the place, the old Kelly Pool beneath the historic Fairmount Water Works, unused and deteriorating since it was swamped by Hurricane Agnes in 1972, where one of the city's newest and least likely impresarios will present the world premiere of a cantata.
NEWS
May 7, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
For Bach, the solo voice was often the center of instrumental comment and speculation. The arias from the Passions and the Cantatas are frequently wreathed in oboe or flute melodies or supported by cello and violin in ways that magnify or at least enhance the single voice. Such arias were the focus of the concert last night at Christ Church, the last in the series of Bach chamber music concerts that are an annual offering at the church. Contralto Betty Jean Rieders sang five arias, four with violin obbligatos and one with trumpet.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1994 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Music for a Summer's Day, Rutgers University in Camden calls its diverse and mostly classical free lunchtime series, which began Wednesday and continues for four more dates through July 20. The first concert presented soprano Julianne Baird singing Alessandro Scarlatti's cantata Su le sponde del Tebro (On the banks of the Tiber), accompanied by the Rutgers Baroque Ensemble conducted by Davis Jerome. Baird eloquently shaped and intoned Scarlatti's brief cantata, whose succession of arias depict a lover's emotional wrestling with pain, grief and resolution.
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The United Christian Church, 8525 New Falls Rd., Levittown, will host an evening of folk music at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the church. Folk singer Ann Leyland, a frequent performer with the Philadelphia Folk Song Society's odyssey programs, will be the featured attraction. Leyland will perform a variety of folk music, including French and Irish songs. A donation of $7 is suggested. Special Shabbat evening Beth Sholom Congregation, 8231 Old York Rd., Elkins Park, will host a special Shabbat evening featuring music at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the synagogue.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The Amerita Chamber Players, string quintet, flute and harpsichord, opened its season at Temple Beth Zion-Beth Israel last night. As customary, it explored the Italian baroque, including Vivaldi, Boccherini, Domenico Scarlatti and a cantata that Handel wrote during his sojourn on the peninsula. The cantata, "Mi palpita il cor," and Vivaldi's Stabat Mater, RV 621, focused one's attention on a guest artist, the mezzo-soprano Harriet Harris. The singer's best work was achieved in the Handel, whose higher tessitura and brisker tempos appeared more comfortable than Stabat Mater's low-lying plaints and somber religiosity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1996 | By Charles Huckabee, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philomel Baroque Orchestra and soprano Julianne Baird presented a satisfyingly warm, sometimes dramatic Christmas concert Sunday in the Church of the Holy Trinity in Rittenhouse Square, and earlier in the weekend in West Chester and Doylestown. In recognition of World AIDS Day, Sunday's concert was dedicated to the memory of those who have died of the disease. In baroque music, Christmas was characterized less by seasonal melodies than by a style of composition called the pastorale, a gentle, triple-meter piece associated with shepherds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
J.S. Bach is said to have been so inventive you could hand him a modern phone directory and he would make it sing. That theory was tested in Tempesta di Mare's enterprising program of three generations of baroque-era composers, solidly but not so probingly performed Saturday at the Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill, in which Bach was the best-known name but at times had the least to work with. Framed by Michael Praetorius and Johann Rosenmüller, Bach accounted for two of five cantatas that traced a cradle-to-the-grave life cycle, the oddest being a birthday piece, Duchlauchtigster Leopold , whose text is full of obsequious, embarrassing praise for the prince being celebrated.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It seems an unlikely place for a performance: three deep, concrete trenches, aqua- and ochre-streaked walls, a slightly ribbed, concrete ceiling. Ancient graffiti is scrawled along the trench walls - 1977, ZEP, ROO, MIK, JIM. Decayed paint is largely scraped away. A turbulent river roils just outside arched windows. Yet, this is the place, the old Kelly Pool beneath the historic Fairmount Water Works, unused and deteriorating since it was swamped by Hurricane Agnes in 1972, where one of the city's newest and least likely impresarios will present the world premiere of a cantata.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Baroque-era music, as heard today, still has a yawning chronological gap in the middle. Did so little happen during that half century between Heinrich Schutz (who died in 1672) and J.S. Bach's heyday in the 1720s? Tempesta di Mare is among a handful of baroque orchestras correcting that perception, so much that its weekend concerts (I heard Saturday night's at the Arch Street Meeting House) hadn't any widely known composers, though all were worth hearing. Compositional manners, so codified later on in Bach and Handel, were heard with provocative deviations in the cantata Meine Freundin, du bist schön by Johann Christoph Bach (an earlier relative of J.S. who lived from 1643 to 1703)
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Once modern performers and listeners progress beyond the Bach and Handel zone of the baroque period, they must decide how much to take the scores at their word. Composing was an everyday activity in the 18th century, much of the music written to be heard only once. So, is Tempesta di Mare's scholarly reevaluation of Georg Telemann's 1765 secular cantata Ino , premiered this weekend in its season-closing concerts, a significant event in the history of a significant piece? Yes, but not necessarily because listeners were closer to the notes Telemann put on paper.
NEWS
May 7, 2004 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Encountering a voice such as Stephanie Blythe's in a room as small as the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater is one of those experiences you're never prepared for - like happening upon an erupting volcano. At close range, Blythe doesn't seize you in the fashion of Ewa Podles, whose vocal force is confrontational in its penetrating strangeness. Blythe is about vocal lushness layered into a single sound, not dissimilar to voices you've heard, but much deeper, and so fluid it's like a genie that can fit into most any bottle.
NEWS
April 22, 2004 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
She was a collage of many, seemingly irreconcilable, parts. During the nine-plus lives that were packed into her 55 years, Philadelphia philanthropist Anni Baker was a Las Vegas backup singer, a Broadway gypsy, an art-song recitalist, composer of her own operetta, and mastermind of a Renaissance fair in Upstate New York. Even before her voice was ruined by chemotherapy, she was one of Philadelphia's most active champions of new music, commissioning composers from Libby Larsen to Jennifer Higdon, appearing in the front row of new-music concerts, beaming at the performers underneath a broad-brimmed hat. Now, five years after her death from breast cancer, she is becoming a piece of her own, an hourlong cantata composed by Andrea Clearfield titled The Long Bright, which will be premiered on Monday at the Kimmel Center by the combined Orchestra 2001, the Temple University Children's Prep Choir, and soprano Hila Plitmann.
NEWS
November 25, 2002 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The best way to drive away a concert audience might be to promise learning at the expense of pleasure. The Philomel Baroque Orchestra promised pleasure indeed at this weekend's concerts, with its beloved guest soprano, Julianne Baird, plus a bit of frisson with the regional premiere of Handel's rediscovered Gloria. But by the end of this cunning program, as heard Friday at St. Paul's Episcopal Church here, you'd learned what makes Handel great and when that greatness is absent. The program was a cross section of Handel's art and his times, suggesting how much higher he stood than his contemporaries in 18th-century London.
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The United Christian Church, 8525 New Falls Rd., Levittown, will host an evening of folk music at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the church. Folk singer Ann Leyland, a frequent performer with the Philadelphia Folk Song Society's odyssey programs, will be the featured attraction. Leyland will perform a variety of folk music, including French and Irish songs. A donation of $7 is suggested. Special Shabbat evening Beth Sholom Congregation, 8231 Old York Rd., Elkins Park, will host a special Shabbat evening featuring music at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the synagogue.
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Brandywine Area Community Choir will present a benefit concert 7 p.m. Sunday at St. Joseph Roman Catholic Church, 338 Manor Ave., Downingtown. The concert will feature a patriotic cantata, America! A Pilgrim's Prayer, A Patriot's Dream. Donations to benefit the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund will be accepted. The choir, featuring 70 singers, has performed cantatas for more than 20 years. Premiere at Har Zion Har Zion Temple, 1500 Hagys Ford Rd., Penn Valley, will host the premiere of KINGS, a New York musical created by award-winning composer Elliot Weiss and author/lyricist Esta Cassway of Wyncote, at 7 p.m. Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The fine lines between blazing inspiration, egomaniacal determination and financial brinksmanship were drawn anew over the last year when conductor John Eliot Gardiner undertook the biggest project of his or any musician's career: The Bach Cantata Pilgrimage. In celebration of the 250th anniversary of J.S. Bach's death, he performed the composer's 198 cantatas all over the world on or close to the dates of the church calendar for which they were written. The grand finale was New Year's Eve at St. Bartholomew's Church in New York, leaving listeners cheering, choristers weeping, and, at the party afterward, the conductor's aides hugging the bar. The haul was long, encompassing 93 concerts at 61 churches in 12 countries, performed by his 18-voice Monteverdi Choir and 35-member English Baroque Soloists.
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