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Cape Town

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SPORTS
May 21, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Cape Town fractured his left front leg in the Preakness and is being retired to stud. "We're assuming it happened during the race," said Ric Waldman, syndicate manager for William T. Young's Overbrook Farm, where the colt was bred and where he will stand. "He went into the race sound, and he came out of it unsound. " Cape Town, trained by D. Wayne Lukas, was fifth in the Kentucky Derby on May 2. In the Preakness on Saturday, the colt threw his left front shoe and finished ninth in the 10-horse field.
TRAVEL
January 6, 2014 | By Amy Ostroff, For The Inquirer
I blame it on the wine. My husband, Jon, and I were at a wine-themed fund-raising auction in spring 2008. There was a lot of wine, and we had tasted our fair share. At the end of the evening, we were chatting with friends near one of the silent-auction tables when it happened. A video montage of exotic animals cavorting across an African savannah caught Jon's eye. "No one has bid on it yet," he murmured softly. "Put our name down. " "What? Are you joking?" I practically shrieked. "Do it," he calmly replied.
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were doing the passie down Adderly Street yesterday, twisting in the hip-wagging, low-crawl strut best accompanied by banjos, saxophones and strong drink. It was Tweede Nuwejaar - second New Year, the second day of January. The "Coons" were back on the streets in their garish uniforms and parasols, parading and clowning, singing and drinking. In South Africa, a "Coon" is a "colored" - a person of mixed race. And perhaps only in South Africa would people of color embrace a racial slur and adapt it to describe a cultural phenomenon that has endured for a century.
NEWS
April 28, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Police fired birdshot and tear gas and used whips yesterday in running battles with hundreds of student protesters, both black and white, at the University of Cape Town. It was believed to be the first time South African police had fired guns to control rioting at a predominantly white school, and it was one of the most violent campus disturbances since a national state of emergency was declared in June 1986. It was also the first time in four months that a violent protest was covered and reported by South African journalists.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If we were in the Northern Hemisphere, we would be rightside up. But we are traveling upside down at 60 miles an hour, feet free and bodies strapped into harnesses beneath a 100-foot-high serpent of black and yellow tubular steel. Cape Town's famous Table Mountain appears to be turned on its top, strangely floating on a pillow of clouds. They call this "The Wildest Place in Africa. " It's not Sierra Leone. It's not Angola. It's Ratanga Junction, Africa's first full-fledged amusement park.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2001 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A volunteer group of Wharton students and alumni will travel to Cape Town, South Africa, this month to help authorities there improve health services. The $60,000 project was inspired by one alumna's experience as a teaching assistant last year for Archbishop Desmond Tutu while he was a visiting professor at Emory University in Atlanta. Frances A. Kelleher, 44, who received her M.B.A. from Wharton in 1984, was at Emory pursuing a doctorate degree in ethics and society. Kelleher, who maintained close ties with Wharton, later asked the archbishop whether there was a way that its students and alumni involved in health care could help in South Africa.
SPORTS
March 15, 1998 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kentucky Derby favorite Lil's Lad was first to the finish line in the $750,000 Florida Derby at Gulfstream Park yesterday, but he didn't win the race. A flagrant bumping foul in a courageous stretch run gave him his first loss of the 1998 season after three straight wins. After an inquiry, Cape Town was declared the winner. Lil's Lad, the bay son of Pine Bluff, was in an eyeball-to-eyeball duel with Cape Town. He bore out badly about five jumps before the finish line, bounced off Cape Town, and managed to keep his nose in front to the end. But five minutes later, the tote board flashed the steward's decision: Cape Town first, Lil's Lad second, Halory Hunter third.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | By Barbara Whitaker, FOR THE INQUIRER
Bumping through the dusty streets of Langa - a black township just outside Cape Town - learning about life in the tin shacks and crumbling buildings, our tour group passed three women butchering sheep heads on tables at the roadside. As we turned up our noses and pointed our cameras, our guide, Nogqili Paula Gumede, and her driver, Perseverance, engaged in a spirited debate over which part of the head is better. "It's so good it's like a special cuisine," Gumede said. "The tongue is good.
NEWS
May 25, 1986 | Associated Press
At the Crossroads shantytown, smoke from burning shacks fills the sky near Cape Town, South Africa. The fire Tuesday came in a week of violence between conservative and leftist factions battling for control of the camp, which houses about 80,000 to 100,000 blacks. More than 30 people died, and thousands of shacks were destroyed, leaving 25,000 to 50,000 people homeless.
TRAVEL
March 20, 2011
Hotel Openings Want to stay somewhere new? Here's AskMen.com's list of the best hotel openings of the year. 1. Shangri-La Hotel Paris, Paris 2. Mondrian SoHo, New York 3. Hotel Breakwater, Miami 4. Palazzo Versace, Dubai, U.A.E. 5. Ritz-Carlton Montreal, Montreal 6. W Paris-Opera, Paris 7. The Queen Victoria, Cape Town, South Africa 8. Waldorf Astoria Berlin, Berlin 9. W London, London 10. St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel, London
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TRAVEL
August 15, 2016 | By Kathy Thomas, For The Inquirer
How did I end up in South Africa? The travel bug bit me as a teenager. But when I recently retired from a long career, I wanted to travel with more purpose. Africa has always called to me, but I wanted to feel connected to a community. I stumbled upon Volunteers in Africa, and through them I connected with St. George's Home for Girls. My lodging was a hostel in Cape Town. It was basic, lively, and friendly. Bathrooms were down the hall, and my fellow residents were mostly less than half my age. I spent my mornings seeing the sights in Cape Town and my afternoons with the children of St. George's.
NEWS
June 8, 2016
By Chris Coons Last week, I led a group of my colleagues on a trip to South Africa. Along with Rep. John Lewis (D., Ga.), a hero of America's civil rights movement, and Kerry Kennedy, president of RFK Human Rights and daughter of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, we traveled to South Africa to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the senator's historic "Ripples of Hope" speech at the University of Cape Town. On June 6, 1966, speaking to a nation struggling through the cruel injustices of apartheid, Kennedy began his speech by describing "a land in which the native inhabitants were at first subdued, but relations with whom remain a problem to this day; a land which defined itself on a hostile frontier; . . . a land which was once the importer of slaves, and now must struggle to wipe out the last traces of that former bondage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Not a single word escaped the lips of Abdullah Ibrahim during his 90-minute performance at Montgomery County Community College on Saturday night. Perhaps that was intended to maintain the spell that the South African pianist/composer cast over the audience, which was mesmerizing; or it could just be his wont, given the fact that his six-piece band, Ekaya, was cued not verbally but through hints in the piano solos that bridged each piece to the next....
TRAVEL
March 31, 2014 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
AGULHAS, South Africa - Going to the ends of the Earth holds a certain magic, especially when it's off the beaten tourist track. That was our goal. It would require more than 130 miles of driving from Cape Town to the tip of the continent; persistence, despite the local who insisted there was nothing worth seeing there; and a wee bit of courage. Popular perception touts the Cape of Good Hope as the end of the world. It is a stunning location of craggy cliffs, crashing waves, and the occasional ostrich on the Atlantic Ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two days from now, just before dawn, at the confluence of the Blue and White Niles in Khartoum, Bina Bilenky Trahan and more than 30 other intrepid souls will be pushing off from the Sudanese capital, heading for Cape Town, South Africa. Their trip will clock in at 7,363 miles and take them through nine countries, across deserts and mountains, in searing heat and subtropical cool. On bikes. And Bilenky Trahan will be doing the Tour d'Afrique - one of the most challenging organized cycling expeditions in the world - on an all-terrain touring bike with her name on it. Literally.
TRAVEL
January 6, 2014 | By Amy Ostroff, For The Inquirer
I blame it on the wine. My husband, Jon, and I were at a wine-themed fund-raising auction in spring 2008. There was a lot of wine, and we had tasted our fair share. At the end of the evening, we were chatting with friends near one of the silent-auction tables when it happened. A video montage of exotic animals cavorting across an African savannah caught Jon's eye. "No one has bid on it yet," he murmured softly. "Put our name down. " "What? Are you joking?" I practically shrieked. "Do it," he calmly replied.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | Associated Press
CAPE TOWN, South Africa - President Obama challenged young Africans to shore up progress on the continent that rests on a "fragile foundation," summoning them to fulfill South Africa's beloved former leader Nelson Mandela's vision of equality and opportunity. Obama, in his own effort to carve out a piece of that legacy, announced a new U.S.-led initiative to double access to electric power across Africa. His remarks at the University of Cape Town capped an emotional day that included a visit to the Robben Island prison where Mandela spent 18 of his 27 years in prison.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG - Hundreds of protesters marched to the U.S. Embassy in South Africa on Friday in a peaceful protest against the impending visit by President Obama. The demonstrators opposed U.S. policy on Cuba, the war in Afghanistan, global warming, and other issues. The rally in Pretoria was organized by trade unionists and members of the South African Communist Party. The protesters want to raise public awareness and warn U.S. citizens about human-rights violations committed by the Obama administration, which includes the nonclosure of the Guantanamo Bay prison holding terrorism suspects, said campaign coordinator Mbuyiseni Ndlozi.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
ALONGSIDE retired Eagles giant Brian Dawkins and actual giant Dikembe Mutombo, formerly of the Sixers, Mayor Nutter announced Wednesday that Philadelphia will host an international conference in September on how sports can be an agent of positive social change. Beyond Sport, which is chaired by former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, brings about 1,000 participants together each year to discuss the role of sports in community building. Recent locations have included London, Chicago and Cape Town, South Africa.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2012 | By David R. Stampone, For The Inquirer
For the penultimate act of Die Antwoord's sold-out show at the Trocadero on Thursday, the self-described South African "futuristik, flame-throw-flow-freeking, zef rap-rave krew" approached the stage's edge. The muscular DJ Hi-Tek, having spun a masterful mix of beats through 70 lively minutes in a gruesome mask sporting huge front teeth, joined the pint-size, pixie-voiced blond rapper Yo-Landi Vi$$er, already flanked by Ninja (a.k.a. art-hop conceptualist Watkin Tudor Jones), her tall MC counterpart.
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