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Car Insurance

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NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the way up to Harrisburg on the bus Tuesday morning, the Lawncrest seven had plenty of time to stew over Philadelphia's high car insurance rates. They had their protest signs ready, mounted on wooden poles, and, as Lawncrest Community Association president Phil Grutzmacher described it at the association's meeting back home that night, "You can really get caught up in this thing. " The seven association members joined about 200 other Philadelphians for a rally at the Capitol to demand cheaper auto-insurance rates and to lobby for reform of the insurance industry.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
South Jersey motorists could save 30 percent or more by shopping around for their car insurance, according to a rate comparison released Aug. 21 by the New Jersey Insurance Department. "Competition works only if people shop around," said Patrick Breslin, public affairs director for the department, which surveyed 78 companies that insure virtually all of the state's drivers. "Competition will never work if people just go to the JUA (Joint Underwriting Association). " The survey shows that a married couple in their 40s, living in Cherry Hill and driving a 1987 Ford Taurus, pay an average premium of $904 (including JUA surcharges and using the "verbal" threshold limiting lawsuits)
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
State Senate candidate Marie Hall, using the Marlton Circle as her backdrop, yesterday called for an immediate 15 percent reduction in auto insurance rates and the appointment of a state insurance-fraud prosecutor. Hall, a Democrat from Medford Lakes, is seeking to represent the Eighth District. She took the opportunity to needle the Republican incumbent, Martha Bark, for her lack of leadership on the issue. "I am here today at the busiest intersection in the Eighth District to say, 'Yes, Martha, this is a problem,' " Hall said, referring to a comment by Bark that auto insurance has been a problem for 20 years and didn't require a rushed solution.
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | By Tom Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a one-two punch that essentially opens the fall campaign, Gov. Whitman and New Jersey Republicans went on the air last night with separate commercials holding the Democrats and their gubernatorial candidate, James E. McGreevey, responsible for the state's high car-insurance rates. McGreevey, who has made car insurance the top issue in his bid to unseat Whitman, countered that the governor and her party were trying to shift the blame for their failure to do anything about the problem.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Drivers fed up with New Jersey's high auto-insurance rates will get a chance to vent their feelings at the ballot box in the fall in nonbinding referendums in every county calling for a 20 percent rate rollback. Mercer County on Tuesday night became the last of the state's 21 counties to agree to place the referendum on its November ballot, according to supporters of the referendum effort. And yesterday, a Mercer County Superior Court judge upheld the action by Mercer's Board of Freeholders and rejected arguments by the county counsel that the referendum would be illegal.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
On the eve of what could be yet another increase in automobile insurance costs, Gov. Kean said yesterday that to reduce rates, he would be willing to agree to a reform package that does not include all the changes he has sought. One such legislative package is now on the governor's desk, the unfinished product of negotiations between key lawmakers who say they can save motorists up to $300 a car in annual costs. Further negotiations are expected. Though Kean refused at a news conference to commit himself absolutely to the compromise, he called it "a good bill . . . even though it's not everything I want," and promised to act on it early next week.
NEWS
November 26, 1996
One of the hidden taxes for Philadelphians may finally come down a bit - if the insurance companies do the right thing. The hidden tax is your auto insurance. Philadelphia has some of the highest rates in the region - three times higher than the statewide average. A four-figure insurance bill that rivals the cost of a used car is common for city drivers. Reasons vary for the whopping bills. One reason is that Philadelphians have an usually hefty appetite for suing one another after a traffic accident, driving rates up. Another culprit: the large number of uninsured drivers on the road.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
They met in secret at all hours of the day and night, even on weekends, squirreling themselves away, hiding from the spotlight and from the creatures who lurked outside. They worked vigorously, their intensity heightened by public pressure and by the importance of their mission. When they emerged from hiding, they revealed the newest plan to tackle one of the largest crises facing the state - and Philadelphia: sky-high auto- insurance rates. In past years, this handful of men meeting behind closed doors would have been lobbyists, working to craft insurance legislation that would profit special-interest groups.
NEWS
April 9, 2003
CONSIDER this a call to arms. Get your arms (and legs) down to City Council this morning at 10 for an important hearing on car insurance rates. This is the next big battle worth fighting in the city. We consider it the "other" tax. The one that's not officially a tax, but eats a big enough hole in Philadelphians' wallets to have as big a detrimental impact as a high city wage tax. It's part of the unholy three items - the schools and the wage tax are the other two - that make push come to shove and sends many people to the suburbs.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
For years, state lawmakers talked about car insurance in New Jersey. They studied it, fought about it, almost compromised over it, then fought about it some more - until finally this fall, when, goaded by irate motorists and their own impending sense of crisis, lawmakers managed to pass some bills aimed at reducing the cost. Now, Rita Knapp is here to tell you, they haven't done enough. Forget the new laws, which do not go into effect until January. Knapp is convinced that they are not going to help her family much.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2016
DEAR ABBY: Nine years ago, I married a man who has a son from a previous marriage. "Eli" is now 26 and lives "on his own. " While he may live under a different roof than his parents, they support him financially. My husband and I pay Eli's car insurance, cellphone bill, toll tag, life insurance policy and whatever other things come up (passport, gym membership). Eli's mom assists with all of his utility bills, in addition to depositing money in his account monthly. They even turned over Eli's 529 tuition account to him. I have tried explaining to my husband that they are enabling Eli, and the umbilical cord should have been cut years ago. Eli has never earned more than $12,000 a year and has no desire to try because he has an endless flow of financial support.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: I recently graduated from college and moved in with my fiance. My parents have assumed most of the cost of our upcoming wedding after insisting we have a big, formal one. I'm still on their cellphone plan, and car and health insurance policies. I do not agree with my parents' religious or political views. However, my mother regularly sends me texts criticizing me for responding to family members' negative comments about my very general and inoffensive status updates. She says she's "disappointed," and then she and Dad threaten to not pay for the wedding.
TRAVEL
January 3, 2016
Question : I recently reserved a midsize rental car in Shannon, Ireland, for myself, my wife, and another couple through Hertz. At the airport, a Hertz representative upgraded us to an SUV, which sounded bigger, but was not. We were given the keys to an Opel Mokka, which was so small we could not fit our bags into it without putting two of them on our laps. I have driven stick-shift cars for 53 years, but when I started driving this car, I had trouble getting it into gear. I must say I was a bit frazzled, as the car was so small and there were four of us in it. I did get it going, but noticed a smell coming from the car right away, so I drove it around the airport block back to Hertz.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Tom Moor, ANGIE'S LIST
Do you ever wonder about all the factors that go into how much you pay for car insurance? The answer isn't as simple as it might seem. There are dozens of factors that go into how much drivers pay for auto insurance. "Auto insurance used to be so easy," said Ken Henry, owner of Henry Insurance Agency in Cincinnati. "All you needed to know was someone's age, accidents or tickets and city or county. If your neighbor had the same car, was your age with a similar driving record, and was with the same insurance company, you both got the same rate.
NEWS
November 26, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Uber and Lyft drove toward legal status in Pennsylvania on Tuesday. On its final voting day before a Thanksgiving break, the Senate overwhelmingly approved a bill that creates provisions to permanently legalize the ride-sharing services. The companies, which connect riders and drivers through mobile apps, currently operate on temporary licenses throughout most of the state. In Philadelphia, both offer service despite lacking the required licenses. The bill would require ride-sharing companies to perform background checks for all potential drivers, mandate a certain level of car insurance, keep records of the vehicles used by all drivers, and implement a "zero-tolerance" policy for drug and alcohol use by drivers on the job, among other provisions.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
LIKE MANY rental-car customers, my husband and I declined the expensive insurance offered at the counter. We knew we were covered through our auto-insurance carrier. Additionally, the credit card we use covers rental cars. In my mind, if we did get into an accident, I would just use the coverage offered by the credit-card company. But during our recent vacation, we came out one morning to climb into our Town and Country minivan and found that the bumper had been hit. Or so we thought.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I'm a 28-year-old gay man who recently graduated with a liberal-arts degree. I always have struggled to support myself. I'm often discouraged because of professional and personal mistakes, which leads me to be pessimistic about my future. I want to date. I know love isn't going to be the save-all, but it would be nice to hang out with someone from time to time. My problem is, in the past men have been critical of my lack of success. They are often unimpressed with me. Successful men won't date me. Yet I feel intellectually incompatible with the blue-collar guys I've been with.
NEWS
June 10, 2015
THIS WEEK CNN rolls out a documentary on the '70s, following its remembrance of the '60s, a decade regarded as the most revolutionary in American history, aside from the Revolution itself. Wrong. The most revolutionary period in American history is now . The '60s brought a sea of changes to music, movies, fashion and to what had been largely a patriarchal society. (Think "Mad Men. ") It was the beginning of feminism and an attempt to dismantle institutionalized and discriminatory American laws and customs.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
The empty nest is vastly overrated. Turns out, teenagers, especially when they are yours, are rather fun to have around, and far better conversationalists than toddlers. They make a joyful racket. I was dreading the moment when our daughter, our younger child, left for college. I made a list of choices. Travel more. Upend life. Acquire dog. The dog, it appears, will have to wait. After quite a few years and a couple of thousand bylines, this is my final column for The Inquirer.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
ON PAPER, it may look like state Rep. Pam DeLissio moved back to Philadelphia on Tuesday. That's the day DeLissio renounced a homestead exemption on a townhouse she has owned near Harrisburg since 2006, paying back the $341 in property taxes she had saved there in the last five years. She also transferred her driver's license, car registration and insurance from there to her other home in Philadelphia. The question now before a judge: Was that too little too late for DeLissio to stay on the May 20 primary-election ballot?
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