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Car Seats

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NEWS
February 9, 1990 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Recall campaigns for defective child car seats are so ineffective that they normally reach only about one of every 20 families who buy the seats, Congress was told yesterday. In often stormy testimony before the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on transportation and hazardous materials, consumer advocate Clarence Ditlow, head of the Center for Auto Safety, said that only 300,000 of 5.6 million seats recalled by manufacturers since 1981 "have been replaced or remedied. " He blamed the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Carley Mossbrook, Staff Writer
By the time they head off for summer vacations, some Pennsylvania parents might have to comply with stricter car-seat rules for their children. A bill on its way to Gov. Wolf would require children to ride in rear-facing car seats until age 2. Those who outgrow the height and weight requirements designated by the car-seat manufacturer would be exempted. Current state laws require drivers to secure children under 4, but do not specify which direction the car seats must face. The bill, which advocates say will help keep children safer in accidents, cruised to approval in the House on Monday.
NEWS
January 5, 2007 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nine out of 12 infant car seats, all designed to meet a federal standard for protecting the smallest passengers in autos, vans and SUVs, "failed disastrously" when subjected to the higher-speed front- and side-impact crash tests used to rate vehicles' crashworthiness, Consumer Reports said yesterday. The car seats "twisted violently or flew off their bases," the magazine said. In one case, a test dummy was hurled 30 feet across a lab in a test on an unenclosed sled, designed to simulate a crash in a Ford Explorer SUV. The test results prompted the magazine's parent organization, Consumers Union, to call for a more stringent safety standard for the rear-facing infant seats.
NEWS
September 15, 1996 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Old, used and abused child car-seats will be "thrown into jail" by Malvern Borough police tomorrow. The spoof-like, but symbolic, gesture is aimed at educating the public on the potentially deadly consequences of unsafe car seats. The Malvern Police Department's car seat bounty program will offer a reward for corralling the offending seats. Free bicycle helmets in a variety of sizes will be given to the first 50 people who bring the seats to the Malvern shopping center, 100 W. King St., between 10 a.m. and noon tomorrow.
NEWS
September 26, 2011
Five months ago, the American Academy of Pediatrics updated its car-safety guidelines, advising that children stay in rear-facing car seats until age 2 - twice as long as previously recommended. The challenge now is to get the word out. A May survey by University of Michigan researchers found that 73 percent of parents turned their child's car seat forward before age 2 - and 30 percent did so before the child was a year old. "This will take a pretty concerted effort on the part of pediatricians and others to counsel parents," said Dennis R. Durbin, a pediatric emergency physician at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and lead author of the revised recommendations.
NEWS
January 19, 2007 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Consumer Reports magazine yesterday withdrew its Jan. 4 assertion that nine of 12 models of infant car seats "failed disastrously" when subjected to the kind of crash tests that federal officials use to rate vehicles' safety for adults. The move came after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration questioned the magazine's methodology in one of two key tests. The agency said the magazine's side-impact test subjected the seats to the equivalent of a broadside crash by a vehicle traveling at more than 70 m.p.h.
NEWS
June 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Young children who are placed in seat belts rather than in car seats or booster seats are four times more likely to suffer a serious head injury in a crash, according to researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Many parents move their small children into seat belts after they outgrow a car seat, often not knowing that seat belts by themselves do not properly fit until a child is about 8 or 9 years old. This premature graduation to seat belts - instead of using a booster seat that allows for better belt positioning - puts children at increased risk of injuries to the brain, face and internal organs, the researchers report in the current issue of Pediatrics.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | By Pamela Curtin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Child safety seats may not be as safe as their owners think, a federal study shows. Many owners of car seats did not respond when the seats were recalled, according to a report released Monday by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. "For the person who has a child seat, if it has been recalled, that is a clear indication that there is a safety defect, and your child is riding at risk," said Clarence Ditlow, executive director of the Center for Auto Safety, a consumer safety group.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
Just checking. As part of Project Safe Baby's car-seat checkpoint yesterday at the Philadelphia Zoo, Police Officer William Sullivan talked with Lisa Barratt of Chesterbrook about the proper use of a seat for her 6 1/2-month-old daughter, Nicole. Midas Muffler, sponsor of the project, offered car seats free to low-income families. At least half of child-safety seats are used improperly.
NEWS
June 11, 2000
Two studies released last week offered insight into how to make riding in cars safer. Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia analyzed the circumstances of more than 2,000 accidents and found that young children who are restrained with seat belts rather than in car seats or booster seats are four times as likely to suffer a serious head injury in a crash. Children should be kept in car seats until they weigh 40 pounds, usually around age 4, the researchers recommended.
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NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Carley Mossbrook, Staff Writer
By the time they head off for summer vacations, some Pennsylvania parents might have to comply with stricter car-seat rules for their children. A bill on its way to Gov. Wolf would require children to ride in rear-facing car seats until age 2. Those who outgrow the height and weight requirements designated by the car-seat manufacturer would be exempted. Current state laws require drivers to secure children under 4, but do not specify which direction the car seats must face. The bill, which advocates say will help keep children safer in accidents, cruised to approval in the House on Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
When making a name for yourself in the music business, it helps to have a backstory. And Will Toledo, who records as Car Seat Headrest, not only has a compelling one - he also has a backseat story. That's where the singer and one-man band, now 23, would sit when, seeking privacy while still in high school in Leesburg, Va., he recorded vocals for albums he put out on the internet music store Bandcamp. Initially, the privacy-seeking songwriter called himself Nervous Young Man. Later, he settled on a moniker inspired by the feature of the family Subaru staring him in the face.
NEWS
April 28, 2016
THE PARENTS: Karen Meshkov, 37, and Matt Pillischer, 37, of Wyncote THE CHILD: Asa Janos Pillischer, adopted Feb. 18, 2016 LENGTH OF TIME BETWEEN KAREN'S FIRST PHONE CALL TO ADOPTIONS WITH LOVE AND THE SECOND, "GOOD NEWS" CALL: Two hours After the second failed IVF attempt, after the bill that was twice what they'd anticipated because the first try ended in an ectopic pregnancy that required two surgeries, Karen and Matt decided to...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My sister-in-law has asked me to pay for repairs to the passenger seat of her car. She was picking up my 9-year-old to stay the night, and when he got inside, he moved the seat forward to better fit his stature. She got upset and said, "The seat was broken. We had it set just right for me when I'm the passenger. " Since he adjusted it, she hasn't been able to reset it. When I asked whether there was a note on the dash that read "Do not move seat," she said no. Then I asked, if this was her best friend's son, would she be requesting money to repair an already-broken seat?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2016 | Lauren McCutcheon
The long: Took more than a century, but the organizers of Philly's 116-year-old, 700,000-square-foot car show finally get it: Unlicensed drivers wanna climb behind the wheels, too. The short: More fun than Detroit. The Jeeps: If they're too big for car seats, they can be buckled in for a bumpy, up-and-down, pro-driven, four-wheel-drive ride in "Camp Jeep" (noon-10 p.m. weekdays, from 9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday). If they're big enough to steer, they'll queue up to drive mini versions in Jeep's Kids' Course.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2015 | By Brion Shreffler, For The Inquirer
With ominous bass and soft drums, Car Seat Headrest started their headlining set at Johnny Brenda's on Sunday night with low-key confidence via the moody and atmospheric "The Ending of Dramamine - How to Leave Town," in which an opening repeating structure was soon joined by contemplative guitar. Sharp, recurring notes began to dance like a candle urged by subtle currents before they turned bluesy, the drum rolled, and the song shifted, still tight and compact - clinical, amid an expansive jam feel that coolly returned to that soft, minimalist beginning.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2014
'TIS HALLOWEEN week. Time to carve pumpkins, toast seeds, give kids who don't even bother to wear costumes artificially colored, high-fructose corn syrup in fun sizes - and wait to see which celebs act most inappropriately. What professional TV dancer will fake an ethnicity? Which young Royal will channel a war criminal? Who among myriad tired one-hit-wonders will use a kids' holiday as an excuse to show his soon-to-be ex-wife what she's missing out on? Check that last box off. This weekend, Robin Thicke , son of Alan , collaborator of Pharrell , performer on "The Bachelor," Miley Cyrus twerkee and soon-to-be-ex of actress Paula Patton , hit another TMZ low by dropping $2,800 on "skimpy greek bras and skirts" - for four gal pals.
NEWS
July 7, 2014 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
It was my birthday this week, and I celebrated by almost getting arrested. Our story begins at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, on a day that was blazing hot - 87 degrees, to be precise. I pulled into a parking lot and noticed that the black car next to me had an adorable little white dog inside. But the car windows were only cracked an inch, and the dog looked frantic, jumping around and panting profusely. The car seats were dotted with saliva. You didn't have to be a vet to know that the dog was in obvious distress.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Latrice Wiles' children have learned that resistance is futile. No amount of whining, howling, or anguished pleas will persuade her to shift into drive unless they are all properly strapped into their car or booster seats. Before she hears the buckles click, her three-month-old daughter, Kylah, "will cry, cry, cry, but I'm not taking her out," said Wiles, a full-time homemaker and mother of four in Germantown. "Anything can happen. " She was speaking from experience. Twenty years ago, on a snowy day around Christmas, her cousin went for a short car trip and allowed the child's grandmother to hold the child.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shawn Alexandra Graham remembers "borrowing" flowers from all over her Blue Bell neighborhood as a little girl, arranging them in water-filled jelly jars, and proudly presenting them to the very people whose gardens she'd just raided. "Some people were not happy," she says. Clearly, they missed the significance of this innocent gesture, because Graham, now 44, grew up to be a floral designer. But it was not a direct path from there to here, which underscores the idea that there are many ways to come to a calling.
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