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FOOD
February 11, 1987 | By JANE FONDA, Special to the Daily News
(Editor's note: Jane Fonda, like millions of other American women, once put herself through a debilitating cycle of crash diets, pills and binges in the effort to achieve an "ideal" figure. She learned the hard way that the real goal is in achieving your best and healthiest self - losing fat but retaining muscle, raising your metabolism and lowering your natural set-point weight. Now, in "Jane Fonda's New Workout and Weight Loss Program," she makes her hard-won knowledge available to everyone.
LIVING
January 3, 1994 | By Sheldon Margen and Dale A. Ogar, FOR THE INQUIRER
Every couple of years the nations of the world participate in an orgy of athletic performances. This year an army of finely tuned, perfectly conditioned bodies will descend on Lillehammer, Norway, to make the rest of us couch potatoes feel guilty and inadequate. So guilty, in fact, that for the next year or so it is likely that sales of home gyms, ski equipment, health club memberships, skating lessons and Jamaican bobsled team movies will boom. Competitive athletes have all sorts of philosophies about what to drink and eat in order to maximize their performance, and a whole new field of sports nutrition has grown up in response to all this interest.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By Karl Neumann, M.D., FOR THE INQUIRER
With the wintertime recreational season upon us, there is one word you should keep in mind: Pasta. Well, maybe also a second word: Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates provide the fuel the body needs for stamina during outdoor activities in cold weather. And pasta is a great source of carbohydrates. Six hours of strenuous winter activities, such as skiing or hiking, require 3,000 to 5,000 calories a day, two or more times the calories needed for a day of office work. The additional calories are needed for keeping warm, exercising and carrying the weight of heavier clothing, and for deeper and more rapid respiration, especially at higher altitudes.
FOOD
February 17, 1988 | By MARGARET SHERIDAN, Special to the Daily News
Feeling stressed? Reach for a bagel. Need to be mentally sharp this morning? Skip the sausage and eggs and order coffee and fruit. Want to wind down from a hectic day? Try pasta. Judith Wurtman's advice is easy to take. In fact, very easy. Who can refuse a cookie as a tranquilizer? Wurtman, a research scientist in the department of brain and cognitive science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, says the foods you eat and when you eat them have a lot to do with your mind and mood.
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The commandments for a healthy diet are practically biblical at this point. More fruits and vegetables. Fewer saturated fats and empty carbs. Like most good habits, though, the canon is easier preached than practiced. And of course, it is exponentially harder to pull off when you are poor. Recognizing that it is human nature to opt for the carrot over the stick, a food pantry in Northeast Philadelphia has adopted an innovative system to encourage better food choices. Through a point system, the clients who go to the Mitzvah Food Project's Choice Food Program at the Klein Jewish Community Center are offered incentives to select fresh produce and whole grains rather than processed foods.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1995 | By Cindy Anders, FOR THE INQUIRER
After more than 20 years in academia, Stephen Roth, a former biology department chairman at the University of Pennsylvania, jumped out of the ivory tower. Roth decided to leap into the private sector, trading in his life as a university researcher and professor for that of chairman and chief executive officer of Neose Pharmaceuticals, a biopharmaceutical company formed in 1990 to refine and market discoveries made in his university laboratory. "I decided if the only reason I wouldn't move to Neose from Penn was fear of earning a living, that was a shameful reason," said Roth.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article includes information from the Associated Press
Call it the ultimate Power Diet. The Army is taking the adage "You Are What You Eat" to new heights, researching not the perfect weapon, but the perfect food to build a Super Soldier. And it may be on to something, the National Academy of Sciences reported yesterday after a two-year independent study. The Army is experimenting with foods that can help a soldier operate on little sleep, stand watch for hours, run faster and for a longer time, overcome fear and make snap judgments in the heat of combat.
LIVING
February 15, 1987 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
Call it the disorder of the decade. You've certainly read about it. You've probably discussed it with friends. And chances are, amid the hoopla, you have wondered if you, too, have hypoglycemia. Why the hype about hypoglycemia? Because it has become a catch-all diagnosis for myriad problems related to low blood sugar. For the last decade, the public has been deluged with reports listing the symptoms associated with the condition. Before you could say, "Get me to a doctor, quick," plenty of people who occasionally felt even the slightest sign of dizziness, nausea or fatigue were convinced that they were victims of hypoglycemia.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | By Ross Kerber, Special to The Inquirer
As a coach at youth basketball camps in Atlantic and Gloucester Counties, Rich Marcucci has seen firsthand the apathy many youngsters have toward developing proper eating habits. "Kids don't think about what they're eating," said Marcucci, who lives in Williamstown. "Sometimes, the only way you can get them to think about it is to have them think of it in terms of performance. " Just as science teachers frequently turn to discussions of dinosaurs and space to keep youngsters interested in the more abstract concepts of science, Marcucci and others increasingly are turning to athletics to teach proper eating habits to youths.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
ADDICTION ADDICTS? I'm Dysfunctional, You're Dysfunctional. That's the title of a new book published by Addison-Wesley that critiques the recovery movement. In the six decades since Alcoholics Anonymous introduced America to the concept of peer support and a radical 12-step method for dealing with alcoholism, AA's 12 Steps have been applied to a growing number of other "addictions. " Wendy Kaminer, a lawyer and public policy fellow at Radcliffe College who wrote the new book, says the proliferation of such groups "celebrates victimization.
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NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The commandments for a healthy diet are practically biblical at this point. More fruits and vegetables. Fewer saturated fats and empty carbs. Like most good habits, though, the canon is easier preached than practiced. And of course, it is exponentially harder to pull off when you are poor. Recognizing that it is human nature to opt for the carrot over the stick, a food pantry in Northeast Philadelphia has adopted an innovative system to encourage better food choices. Through a point system, the clients who go to the Mitzvah Food Project's Choice Food Program at the Klein Jewish Community Center are offered incentives to select fresh produce and whole grains rather than processed foods.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1995 | By Cindy Anders, FOR THE INQUIRER
After more than 20 years in academia, Stephen Roth, a former biology department chairman at the University of Pennsylvania, jumped out of the ivory tower. Roth decided to leap into the private sector, trading in his life as a university researcher and professor for that of chairman and chief executive officer of Neose Pharmaceuticals, a biopharmaceutical company formed in 1990 to refine and market discoveries made in his university laboratory. "I decided if the only reason I wouldn't move to Neose from Penn was fear of earning a living, that was a shameful reason," said Roth.
FOOD
February 22, 1995 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Look at any sports-training table. Ask an athlete what he eats before a competition. Seek the advice of nutritionists and trainers. And you just might conclude that bananas, pasta, and sports-energy bars are essential to success in sports. Certainly those basics of a high-carbohydrate, high-energy diet are an integral part of the regimen of the tennis players who have converged on Philadelphia this week for the 1995 Comcast U.S. Indoor men's matches at the Spectrum.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article includes information from the Associated Press
Call it the ultimate Power Diet. The Army is taking the adage "You Are What You Eat" to new heights, researching not the perfect weapon, but the perfect food to build a Super Soldier. And it may be on to something, the National Academy of Sciences reported yesterday after a two-year independent study. The Army is experimenting with foods that can help a soldier operate on little sleep, stand watch for hours, run faster and for a longer time, overcome fear and make snap judgments in the heat of combat.
LIVING
January 3, 1994 | By Sheldon Margen and Dale A. Ogar, FOR THE INQUIRER
Every couple of years the nations of the world participate in an orgy of athletic performances. This year an army of finely tuned, perfectly conditioned bodies will descend on Lillehammer, Norway, to make the rest of us couch potatoes feel guilty and inadequate. So guilty, in fact, that for the next year or so it is likely that sales of home gyms, ski equipment, health club memberships, skating lessons and Jamaican bobsled team movies will boom. Competitive athletes have all sorts of philosophies about what to drink and eat in order to maximize their performance, and a whole new field of sports nutrition has grown up in response to all this interest.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By Karl Neumann, M.D., FOR THE INQUIRER
With the wintertime recreational season upon us, there is one word you should keep in mind: Pasta. Well, maybe also a second word: Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates provide the fuel the body needs for stamina during outdoor activities in cold weather. And pasta is a great source of carbohydrates. Six hours of strenuous winter activities, such as skiing or hiking, require 3,000 to 5,000 calories a day, two or more times the calories needed for a day of office work. The additional calories are needed for keeping warm, exercising and carrying the weight of heavier clothing, and for deeper and more rapid respiration, especially at higher altitudes.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
ADDICTION ADDICTS? I'm Dysfunctional, You're Dysfunctional. That's the title of a new book published by Addison-Wesley that critiques the recovery movement. In the six decades since Alcoholics Anonymous introduced America to the concept of peer support and a radical 12-step method for dealing with alcoholism, AA's 12 Steps have been applied to a growing number of other "addictions. " Wendy Kaminer, a lawyer and public policy fellow at Radcliffe College who wrote the new book, says the proliferation of such groups "celebrates victimization.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | By Ross Kerber, Special to The Inquirer
As a coach at youth basketball camps in Atlantic and Gloucester Counties, Rich Marcucci has seen firsthand the apathy many youngsters have toward developing proper eating habits. "Kids don't think about what they're eating," said Marcucci, who lives in Williamstown. "Sometimes, the only way you can get them to think about it is to have them think of it in terms of performance. " Just as science teachers frequently turn to discussions of dinosaurs and space to keep youngsters interested in the more abstract concepts of science, Marcucci and others increasingly are turning to athletics to teach proper eating habits to youths.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Mark Twain once said the only way to keep your health is to eat what you don't want, drink what you don't like, and do what you'd rather not. To help their students think about healthy habits differently, health teachers in South Jersey are planning student wellness days in their elementary, middle and high schools. And to get tips on how to run them, 45 teachers and several students attended a Student Wellness Conference in Sewell on Monday, sponsored by the state Department of Education.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1989 | By Janet Ruth Falon, Special to The Inquirer
Teatime in America is no longer the exclusive domain of genteel dowagers, tweedy Anglophiles or avid coffee-shunners. Nowadays you might spot high- powered professionals forging out a deal over a plate of finger sandwiches, or garden-variety tea-takers who realize that this repast is the perfect antidote to the natural dip in energy that most people experience in the late afternoon. It's a sort of wide-awake siesta for on-the-go Americans. In essence, tea is hot. (And tea should be hot, although a troubling fact of the Philadelphia tea scene is that the water served is usually cooler than acceptable.
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