CollectionsCarbon
IN THE NEWS

Carbon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Conrail officials have said that carbon buildup in the exhaust system of a train engine caused a fire that burned a mile-long strip through Charlestown Township April 26. About 200 volunteer firefighters from 33 companies in Chester and Montgomery Counties fought the fire, which was the largest recorded in the rural township. "We will make every effort to reimburse costs, if reasonable," said Minor Johnson, a member of the rail company's office of state and local affairs. Conrail had not received any claims for damages or requests for reimbursement.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
From the vantage point of a typical angler fishing from the banks of the White Clay Creek, it is hard to believe that six million cubic meters of water courses through the stream each year. And within that volume of water, about 20 tons of organic carbon is also moving downstream, sometimes in forms so minuscule they are invisible to the naked eye. Not to worry. Organic carbon is a good thing. It is the lifeblood of streams, feeding the plants, insects and organisms whose diversity is a measure of stream health.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taken together, the world's forests - the humid tropical realms, the productive trees of the temperate zones, and the boreal expanses of the north - make up a third of the landmass of the planet. As such, they command a great deal of respect among scientists and others. But a paper recently published by two Newtown Square foresters and an international cadre of colleagues has upped the cache of forests considerably. The group found that the forests sock away far more of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, than anyone thought.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer (The Associated Press contributed to this article.)
The president of a Westampton-based manufacturing company said yesterday that the firm received approval from both British and United States authorities before selling the Soviet Union custom-built furnaces that could help make materials for nuclear missiles. Raymond Roberts, president of Consarc Corp., which has offices in Rancocas and Scotland, said in an interview that the company did not know that the furnaces could be modified to make carbon-carbon, a light, durable material that can be used to make missiles fly more accurately.
NEWS
February 1, 2009
Fifteen people attending a party at a community center in West Oak Lane were stricken by carbon monoxide poisoning and rushed to Albert Einstein Medical Center last night, a hospital spokesman said. About 75 people, mostly children, were at the H&H Community Development Center in the 2000 block of East Haines Street when fumes from a generator used to inflate a moon bounce amusement made several people dizzy and sick. The fire rescue squad was summoned at about 8:30 p.m. and sped the victims to Einstein.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2003 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From 1990 to 2000, a venerable British manufacturer participated in a global conspiracy to fix the price of tiny but vital carbon products used in trains operated by PATCO, SEPTA and other subway systems. When federal prosecutors in Philadelphia issued subpoenas to the company's U.S. subsidiary in 1999, top executives in England acted swiftly. They ordered incriminating documents destroyed. They encouraged conspirators at another company to lie to a federal grand jury in Philadelphia.
FOOD
July 14, 2011
Books for Cooks This print, by Jane Mount, is part of her Ideal Bookshelf series. With the French Laundry, Chez Panisse, and Frank Stitt's Southern Table cookbooks featured, we couldn't agree more. Ideal Bookshelf 6, GW, 11 by 14 inches, $50; 16 by 20 inches, $200 at www.20x200.com . - Ashley Primis Nicer Slicer Kuhn Rikon's new watermelon knife has a Japanese carbon steel blade with cutouts that look like watermelon seeds but, along with the knife's nonstick coating, help prevent sticking.
NEWS
March 9, 2016
ISSUE | ENVIRONMENT Heeding the call of the wild The U.S. House of Representatives took a historic vote last month, designating 1.6 million acres in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge as wilderness and part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. The Udall-Eisenhower Arctic Wilderness Act has been introduced in every Congress for nearly three decades and had never been voted on until Feb. 26. The act is named for two American visionaries: Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who set aside the core of the refuge in 1960, and former Democratic U.S. Rep. Morris Udall (D., Ariz)
NEWS
October 29, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even after Mary Mulderrig had weatherized her home, upgraded her heater, and switched her lightbulbs, she still didn't think she was doing enough. She decided to go the next step and buy "carbon offsets" that would, in effect, allow her to invest in antipollution projects to counterbalance what she produces - a lot of it just by driving around. There are plenty of options. But are they good ones? For $99.80, one company promises to offset the carbon produced annually by the typical Pennsylvania home by burning methane from cow manure to make electricity.
NEWS
November 16, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
You can rake autumn's leaves into a heap for pickup, or you can run the lawn mower over them and turn them into mulch. But even better, you can use them (preferably shredded) to efficiently create delicious compost for your garden. There are several ways to do this; the easiest involves a container plus ingredients in the right proportions. Need to know: It's not just a matter of dumping leaves into a pile and coming back a few days later to find the rich humus you crave. You need to introduce the necessary organisms to produce close-to-perfect compost.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 29, 2016 | STAFF WRITER
A carbon monoxide leak forced the evacuation early Sunday morning of a hookah lounge in Old City, along with a restaurant and some apartment units above. The Philadelphia Fire Department was called out to the 200 block of Chestnut Street at 12:46 a.m. after a resident of an upstairs apartment smelled gas, the fire department said. Police and PGW also responded to the scene. B Side Hookah Lounge and the nearby Barra's Italian Restaurant & Lounge were evacuated, as were the apartments.
NEWS
March 28, 2016
Carbon monoxide kills 4 at apartments New Castle County police were investigating Saturday four deaths at a Wilmington apartment complex a day earlier from suspected carbon monoxide poisoning. Found Friday evening in two units of Building G of the Evergreen Apartments at Riverfront Heights on Homestead Road, police said, were Carl Dunfee, 60; Veronica Mousely, 58; Andrew Spanakos, 72; and Nancy Uniacke, 56. A dog also was found dead, police said. In addition, five adults and three children were stricken and treated at Wilmington hospitals.
NEWS
March 9, 2016
ISSUE | ENVIRONMENT Heeding the call of the wild The U.S. House of Representatives took a historic vote last month, designating 1.6 million acres in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge as wilderness and part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. The Udall-Eisenhower Arctic Wilderness Act has been introduced in every Congress for nearly three decades and had never been voted on until Feb. 26. The act is named for two American visionaries: Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who set aside the core of the refuge in 1960, and former Democratic U.S. Rep. Morris Udall (D., Ariz)
NEWS
February 21, 2016
Q: How can I protect myself from carbon monoxide poisoning? A: As the weather gets colder, cases of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning increase because people tend to use fireplaces, portable heaters, and generators during power outages or attempt to warm up their cars without adequate ventilation. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 400 Americans die from unintentional CO poisoning not linked to fires, more than 20,000 visit the emergency room, and more than 4,000 are hospitalized.
NEWS
February 16, 2016 | By Tomas Brannemo
Climate change is taking a toll on our nation. New government data confirms that 2015 was the second-hottest year on record in the United States. Record warmth contributed to 10 climate disasters last year, which cost billions of dollars and hundreds of lives. The United States just joined a global coalition to arrest climate change. At the United Nations Climate Change Conference in December, nearly 200 countries, including the United States, forged an agreement to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions.
REAL_ESTATE
February 1, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Carbon monoxide poisoning is more of a danger in winter months than it is in summer because cold weather tends to make us stay in a very tight indoor environment. The odorless, colorless - yet potentially deadly - gas results from the burning of wood, natural gas, oil, and kerosene. To keep carbon monoxide from building up in your home, don't use generators, charcoal grills, camp stoves, or other gasoline- or charcoal-burning devices inside the house, the basement or the garage, or near windows.
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
WITH CARBON monoxide incidents up in the city 41 percent over last year and with heating season underway, the Philadelphia Fire Department is reminding property owners and residents that state and local laws now mandate carbon monoxide alarms in all city dwellings. Although there hasn't been a carbon monoxide fatality in the city in two years, so far in 2015 the department has responded to 340 carbon monoxide incidents, up from 241 during all of 2014, said Executive Fire Chief Clifford Gilliam.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | Don Russell, Daily News
LAST WEEK, The New York Times tackled the quandary of outdoor wine drinking. Specifically: How does one enjoy a fine vintage on a picnic without the proper glassware? Indeed. For starters, everyone knows it's impossible to balance a crystal Champagne flute on a cashmere blanket. Never mind those pesky bugs swarming that 2005 magnum of Saint Emilion Grand Cru. But the big question on the south lawn at the summer estate is: Cabernet goblets or claret chalices? Oh, pooh! The servants simply cannot be trusted with the Waterford decanter - not after that disastrous outing in the Hamptons when Jeeves nearly knocked it over with a croquet mallet.
REAL_ESTATE
February 23, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Cabin fever is taking hold across a huge chunk of the country these days. In communities such as mine, where plowing is what you do to the north 40 in early spring and salt is shaken only on food, confinement because of icy streets and sidewalks can be prolonged. And long-term confinement increases exposure to many household dangers, especially carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas produced when any carbon-based fuel is burned. Quoting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Deborah Hanson of alarm maker First Alert says carbon monoxide poisoning "puts more than 20,000 people in the hospital and is responsible for nearly 450 deaths every year.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many who spoke up at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's public meeting here last week on limiting carbon pollution from power plants - no matter which side they took - it all came down to this: their children. "It's time to clean up the air for the health of our children," said Gretchen Dahlkemper-Alfonso, a Philadelphia mother of three and a leader of the environmental group Moms Clean Air Force. Bryan Palko was worried about his offspring, too, but for a different reason.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|