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Carbon

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NEWS
June 7, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Conrail officials have said that carbon buildup in the exhaust system of a train engine caused a fire that burned a mile-long strip through Charlestown Township April 26. About 200 volunteer firefighters from 33 companies in Chester and Montgomery Counties fought the fire, which was the largest recorded in the rural township. "We will make every effort to reimburse costs, if reasonable," said Minor Johnson, a member of the rail company's office of state and local affairs. Conrail had not received any claims for damages or requests for reimbursement.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
From the vantage point of a typical angler fishing from the banks of the White Clay Creek, it is hard to believe that six million cubic meters of water courses through the stream each year. And within that volume of water, about 20 tons of organic carbon is also moving downstream, sometimes in forms so minuscule they are invisible to the naked eye. Not to worry. Organic carbon is a good thing. It is the lifeblood of streams, feeding the plants, insects and organisms whose diversity is a measure of stream health.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taken together, the world's forests - the humid tropical realms, the productive trees of the temperate zones, and the boreal expanses of the north - make up a third of the landmass of the planet. As such, they command a great deal of respect among scientists and others. But a paper recently published by two Newtown Square foresters and an international cadre of colleagues has upped the cache of forests considerably. The group found that the forests sock away far more of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, than anyone thought.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer (The Associated Press contributed to this article.)
The president of a Westampton-based manufacturing company said yesterday that the firm received approval from both British and United States authorities before selling the Soviet Union custom-built furnaces that could help make materials for nuclear missiles. Raymond Roberts, president of Consarc Corp., which has offices in Rancocas and Scotland, said in an interview that the company did not know that the furnaces could be modified to make carbon-carbon, a light, durable material that can be used to make missiles fly more accurately.
NEWS
February 1, 2009
Fifteen people attending a party at a community center in West Oak Lane were stricken by carbon monoxide poisoning and rushed to Albert Einstein Medical Center last night, a hospital spokesman said. About 75 people, mostly children, were at the H&H Community Development Center in the 2000 block of East Haines Street when fumes from a generator used to inflate a moon bounce amusement made several people dizzy and sick. The fire rescue squad was summoned at about 8:30 p.m. and sped the victims to Einstein.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2003 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From 1990 to 2000, a venerable British manufacturer participated in a global conspiracy to fix the price of tiny but vital carbon products used in trains operated by PATCO, SEPTA and other subway systems. When federal prosecutors in Philadelphia issued subpoenas to the company's U.S. subsidiary in 1999, top executives in England acted swiftly. They ordered incriminating documents destroyed. They encouraged conspirators at another company to lie to a federal grand jury in Philadelphia.
FOOD
July 14, 2011
Books for Cooks This print, by Jane Mount, is part of her Ideal Bookshelf series. With the French Laundry, Chez Panisse, and Frank Stitt's Southern Table cookbooks featured, we couldn't agree more. Ideal Bookshelf 6, GW, 11 by 14 inches, $50; 16 by 20 inches, $200 at www.20x200.com . - Ashley Primis Nicer Slicer Kuhn Rikon's new watermelon knife has a Japanese carbon steel blade with cutouts that look like watermelon seeds but, along with the knife's nonstick coating, help prevent sticking.
NEWS
October 29, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even after Mary Mulderrig had weatherized her home, upgraded her heater, and switched her lightbulbs, she still didn't think she was doing enough. She decided to go the next step and buy "carbon offsets" that would, in effect, allow her to invest in antipollution projects to counterbalance what she produces - a lot of it just by driving around. There are plenty of options. But are they good ones? For $99.80, one company promises to offset the carbon produced annually by the typical Pennsylvania home by burning methane from cow manure to make electricity.
NEWS
November 16, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
You can rake autumn's leaves into a heap for pickup, or you can run the lawn mower over them and turn them into mulch. But even better, you can use them (preferably shredded) to efficiently create delicious compost for your garden. There are several ways to do this; the easiest involves a container plus ingredients in the right proportions. Need to know: It's not just a matter of dumping leaves into a pile and coming back a few days later to find the rich humus you crave. You need to introduce the necessary organisms to produce close-to-perfect compost.
NEWS
March 16, 2003 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Experts have told NASA for years that simply covering the wings of a space shuttle while it sits on the launchpad could prevent a problem that investigators now think may have contributed to the destruction of the shuttle Columbia. But NASA ignored the recommendation, one of those experts said in an interview Wednesday, even though the idea had been endorsed by top materials researchers inside and outside the space agency. Their suggestion was simple: Drape the equivalent of a painter's drop cloth over the shuttle's wings to protect them from the corrosive sea air at the Cape Canaveral, Fla., launch site and prevent tiny pinholes from forming on the edges of the wings.
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REAL_ESTATE
February 23, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Cabin fever is taking hold across a huge chunk of the country these days. In communities such as mine, where plowing is what you do to the north 40 in early spring and salt is shaken only on food, confinement because of icy streets and sidewalks can be prolonged. And long-term confinement increases exposure to many household dangers, especially carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas produced when any carbon-based fuel is burned. Quoting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Deborah Hanson of alarm maker First Alert says carbon monoxide poisoning "puts more than 20,000 people in the hospital and is responsible for nearly 450 deaths every year.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many who spoke up at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's public meeting here last week on limiting carbon pollution from power plants - no matter which side they took - it all came down to this: their children. "It's time to clean up the air for the health of our children," said Gretchen Dahlkemper-Alfonso, a Philadelphia mother of three and a leader of the environmental group Moms Clean Air Force. Bryan Palko was worried about his offspring, too, but for a different reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
Janice Kenney had always lived in small spaces - rooms, for example, carved out of haylofts and paid for in barter by mucking stables - but it still took her the better part of a year to compress her 62 years of accumulated possessions into a tidy 72 square feet. Now, two years after moving into her grown-up playhouse - a wooden structure on wheels with a peaked roof, tiny porch, sleeping loft, and a few square inches of storage to spare - Kenney said the lifestyle change was entirely worth it. "You feel completely freed up. I had bins and bins of stuff in storage, and I had to move that stuff every time I moved," she said, relaxing in her diminutive dwelling, parked under a tree at the edge of a horse pasture in Kennett Square.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
You think tree pollen has been in great quantity this spring? An environmental research firm hired by Honeywell looked into what air purifiers had captured over two months in houses in Los Angeles and New York City - not too far from us - and this is what was found: Black carbon - emission sources include diesel engines, vehicles, and residential heating. Heavy metals - trace metals include aluminum, chromium, nickel, tin and lead, a known neurotoxin. Sources often include paints and coatings, laser-printer ink jets, nail polish, motor oil, home cleaning detergents, fossil fuels or exhaust.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bucks County couple and their two children died of apparent carbon monoxide poisoning Monday when the husband committed suicide by leaving his car running in the garage and the others were overcome by the fumes. According to Pennsylvania state police, troopers responded around 11:20 p.m. to find the four family members - identified as Gary Reitnauer, 59; his wife, Michele, 58; and daughters Kimberly, 16, and Jamie, 10 - inside a residence on Kumry Road in Milford Township. None could be revived, police said.
NEWS
January 22, 2013
CLAIRTON, Pa. - Carbon monoxide poisoning has been confirmed as the cause of death of a pair of lifelong friends in Western Pennsylvania, and authorities are urging people to be sure they have detectors for the colorless and odorless gas. The Allegheny County Medical Examiner's Office confirmed Sunday that acute carbon monoxide poisoning killed William Chapman, 56, and Gary Townsend, 47, in their house Saturday. The Medical Examiner's Office ruled the deaths accidental and said the source of the carbon monoxide is still under investigation.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
No to Hagel The last Republican-in-name-only brought in by a Democratic president to run the Pentagon and to give the chief bipartisan cover to starve the military (every Democrat's dream) was Bill Cohen, who served under Bill Clinton ("New team for security challenges," Tuesday). After four years under their feckless leadership and general lack of interest, our nation suffered the most deadly attack since Pearl Harbor. In fairness to Clinton, there was a relative calm in the world then, and Cohen was smart enough not to harbor oafish points of view, unlike Chuck Hagel, President Obama's nominee for defense secretary.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Amanda Oglesby, ASBURY PARK PRESS
NEPTUNE, N.J. - In the wake of recent evacuations of thousands of students nationwide, a New Jersey schools group wants to mandate carbon monoxide detectors in schools. New Jersey School Buildings and Grounds Association officials, as well as some local fire officials, say schools would be safer if required to have the alarms. There have been nearly 20 evacuation incidents involving high levels of carbon monoxide in U.S. schools in recent years, but the devices are not required in New Jersey school buildings.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Jeff Martin, Associated Press
ATLANTA - Potentially lethal carbon monoxide levels in an Atlanta elementary school sent 42 students and six adults to hospitals Monday amid the evacuation of about 500 students, authorities said. A teacher and a cafeteria worker were among patients treated after firefighters responded to Finch Elementary School shortly after 8 a.m., Atlanta Fire Capt. Marian McDaniel told the Associated Press. Firefighters were initially told that people were unconscious at the school, but none were when fire crews arrived.
NEWS
November 24, 2012
YORK, Pa. - A carbon monoxide leak at a central Pennsylvania prison appears to have been caused by a problem with the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning system that serves the affected housing unit. York County Prison in Springettsbury Township sent 49 female inmates to hospitals late Wednesday and early Thursday. County officials said in a statement that all 49 had been returned to prison by late Thursday afternoon. County Commissioner Doug Hoke said it was an "unfortunate situation" but "could have been a disaster.
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