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Carbon Dioxide

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NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Mark Drajem, BLOOMBERG
The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the first limits on greenhouse-gas emissions from U.S. power plants, the largest source of carbon dioxide, a pollutant linked to climate change. The rules would permit emissions from new power plants at 1,000 pounds of carbon dioxide per megawatt hour, about the level for a modern natural-gas plant, the EPA said Tuesday in an e-mailed statement. The limit would effectively preclude construction of new coal-fired plants. "We're taking a common-sense step to reduce pollution in our air, protect the planet for our children, and move us into a new era of American energy," Lisa Jackson, EPA administrator, said in a statement.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | By Jane Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A biologist told the Franklin Township Board of Education and about 20 people last night that some areas of the Mary F. Janvier Elementary School have elevated levels of carbon dioxide, which may be one of the culprits that is causing some students and staff to become sick. Cynthia Toth of Terra Bio Chem Environmental Services Inc. suggested that the board install either overhead fans or air deflectors to improve the circulation of fresh air. Since 1992, teachers and students have complained of dry throats, headaches, irritated eyes and difficulty breathing.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Kevin Begos, Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - In a surprising turnaround, the amount of carbon dioxide being released into the atmosphere in the United States has fallen dramatically, to its lowest level in 20 years, and government officials say the biggest reason is that cheap and plentiful natural gas has led many power plant operators to switch from dirtier-burning coal. Many of the world's leading climate scientists didn't see the drop coming, in large part because it happened as a result of market forces rather than direct government action against carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas that traps heat in the atmosphere.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Residents of Kennedy Crossing and the adjacent neighborhood of Cardinal View once again packed Plymouth Township's auditorium this week to learn the results of carbon dioxide testing that began nearly a month ago. And, once again, they went home with unanswered questions. Although officials from the Montgomery County Health Department and the federal Environmental Protection Agency said they had completed the first round of testing in most of the homes, they said additional tests were needed to determine the source of the unusually high levels of carbon dioxide that caused a girl to faint in her Kennedy Crossing basement Sept.
NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to public understanding of climate change - the forecast is hazy with a 90 percent chance of confusion. Is it a threat to life as we know it? Is it a hoax perpetrated by some bicycle-riding, SUV-hating, tofu-eating eggheads? In Copenhagen, President Obama is scheduled to speak on Friday as world leaders continue to work out strategies to curb the world's ever-increasing carbon emissions. Meanwhile, critics are still pointing to a cache of leaked e-mails that hackers stole from climate scientists.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Concerned and frustrated residents of two Montgomery County neighborhoods learned last night that health officials are stymied by the high levels of carbon dioxide found in many basements since Hurricane Floyd hit Sept. 16. "This is the first time something like this has occurred and we don't know what's going on, if it's manmade or naturally occurring," said Greg Herbert, director of environmental field services for the Montgomery County Health Department. Herbert said elevated levels of carbon dioxide had been found in homes in the Kennedy Crossing and adjacent Cardinal View neighborhoods.
NEWS
August 15, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When scientists began studying ways to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, to help lessen global warming, some felt a promising tool was the vast Amazon rain forest. Trees, after all, absorb carbon dioxide as they grow, and early measurements from aerial towers in the Amazon suggested that the forest sucked up the offending gas with a vengeance. But Anthony Aufdenkampe, a biogeochemist now at the Stroud Water Research Center in Avondale, Chester County, is poking holes in that theory.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | By Jennifer Van Doren, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township filed two citations against a soil-cleaning company yesterday for violations of their land development agreement. A company spokesman questioned the necessity of one citation and expressed surprise at the other. CleanSoils Inc., which has leased space on the old USX Fairless Works plant since October 1993, burns soil to remove diesel fuel and gasoline. The first citation states that the company is planning to pave an area and has not obtained township permission, as is required.
NEWS
April 28, 1996 | By Wendy Greenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Upper Moreland School District is trying to clear the air. Although tests now show there is no cause for alarm, carbon dioxide levels recently were marginally elevated in two district buildings - Upper Moreland High School and Cold Spring Elementary School - when compared to a comfort-range standard set by a national engineering society. Superintendent Paul Beck said last week that ventilation systems in the district's schools, some of which are nearly 45 years old, would be upgraded to include carbon dioxide sensors with automatic fresh-air dampers.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1995 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Earth's climate may warm up a teensy-weensy bit less in the next century, thanks to Public Service Electric & Gas Co., New Jersey's largest utility. Earlier this week, the power company pledged to reduce its emissions of carbon dioxide by about 10 percent by 2000. Carbon dioxide is among those gases that are heating the atmosphere, many scientists believe. The utility also has agreed to make the Environmental Defense Fund its very own watchdog to make sure it lives up to its commitments.
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NEWS
January 2, 2016
By Veerabhadran Ramanathan and Daniel Press Among climate scientists, the consensus is that we must become carbon-neutral by 2050 to avoid catastrophic environmental disruptions. Negotiators at the recent summit in Paris accordingly focused on curbing carbon dioxide emissions. There's a major problem, however, with a CO2-centric strategy. Because carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere for a century or more, and because we won't abandon fossil fuels overnight, neutrality by 2050 simply isn't good enough to keep the Earth from warming 2 degrees Celsius - the generally agreed-upon limit - much less the ambitious goal of 1.5 degrees Celsius that many nations support.
NEWS
December 30, 2015
ISSUE | DEATH PENALTY Reprieve warranted The Jewish Social Policy Action Network applauds the unanimous decision by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court upholding Gov. Wolf's grant of a reprieve to death-row inmate Terrance Williams ("Court backs Wolf in Phila. death penalty case," Dec. 22). The decision was in keeping with the position taken by JSPAN in a detailed statement of interest supporting a brief filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, in which we reviewed our long-standing opposition to capital punishment as it is imposed, based on a reading of many Jewish sources and our concern about its moral implications.
NEWS
December 8, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Nearly 200 world leaders - among them the heads of state of the two countries that produce the most carbon dioxide emissions, China and the United States - made strong statements to open the continuing climate control summit in Paris last week. But any accord reached before the meeting ends Friday will likely lack the thunder of their speeches. Even before the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21) began, scientists warned that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change was setting the bar too low. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon voiced similar pessimism, saying the reductions in carbon dioxide emissions being pledged by each country were too modest.
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Energy policy dinosaurs are trying to trample new Environmental Protection Agency rules designed to cut carbon pollution from its most prolific source: coal-fired electricity plants. Republicans in Congress and 10 governors are fighting the Clean Power Plan, which would regulate carbon dioxide from coal plants. Each state is supposed to draft its own plan. Some governors say they won't, but that would only result in the Environmental Protection Agency's writing a state plan for them.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
MONTOURSVILLE, Pa. - The inside of the Twin Otter airplane was turned into a flying laboratory, crammed with racks of computer equipment and an array of suitcase-sized plastic containers. Its mission: to fly over the busy natural-gas drilling operations of northeastern Pennsylvania so a pair of scientists could measure how much of the stuff was leaking into the atmosphere. In particular, the researchers were interested in the prime component of natural gas, an odorless substance called methane that gets much of the blame for global warming.
NEWS
January 27, 2015
ISSUE | ENERGY POLICY Nuclear generation key to lower carbon While taking a welcome stance in favor of achieving carbon neutrality in Pennsylvania, State Rep. Greg Vitali (D., Delaware) was remiss in his failure to highlight nuclear energy as an emissions-free source that must remain part of the state's energy mix if it is serious about carbon reduction ("Issues facing Pa. leaders," Jan. 20). Pennsylvania's existing nuclear energy plants provide more than 34 percent of its electricity and account for an impressive 93 percent of emissions-free electricity.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
An ancient, highly porous form of charcoal is being touted as a godsend for soil health and fertility - transforming farms, home gardens, and urban and suburban landscapes. It might even combat climate change. Any wonder they're calling biochar a "miracle product"? "It's important not to promise too much, but this is mind-popping stuff," says Dale Hendricks, owner of Green Light Plants, a wholesale organic nursery in Landenberg, Chester County, who talks up biochar to public gardens and local garden clubs, and cooks his own in barrels, kilns, and a wood stove.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposed federal rule to reduce carbon pollution from existing power plants - a signature initiative for the Obama administration - would not only address climate change but protect public health, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said in announcing it Monday. But how Pennsylvania and New Jersey would meet that mandate is still very much up in the air. By 2030, the nation's power sector would, on average, have to reduce carbon dioxide emissions 30 percent below 2005 levels.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
Most people don't walk around thinking about the air they breathe. If they did, a new report that says one of the most powerful contributors to global warming is much more prevalent than previously thought might make them stumble. The ecological villain is methane, a primary component of natural gas, which Stanford University researchers now believe is 50 percent more common in the atmosphere than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had thought. That matters because methane is believed to be 30 times more powerful than carbon dioxide in causing global warming.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many who spoke up at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's public meeting here last week on limiting carbon pollution from power plants - no matter which side they took - it all came down to this: their children. "It's time to clean up the air for the health of our children," said Gretchen Dahlkemper-Alfonso, a Philadelphia mother of three and a leader of the environmental group Moms Clean Air Force. Bryan Palko was worried about his offspring, too, but for a different reason.
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