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Carbon Dioxide

NEWS
September 29, 1999 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Federal, state and county health officials investigating high levels of carbon dioxide in a local subdivision will meet with Kensington Crossing homeowners tonight to discuss findings and remediation efforts. Investigators are trying to determine whether the gas was a factor in the death of a resident there last week and the fainting spell of a young girl in a basement of one of the homes. "We really are still in the information-gathering phase," said Robert Gage, director of the Montgomery County Health Department.
NEWS
June 4, 1995 | By Richard Berkowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The latest test results on the high school's air quality are in, and although the school passed, it did not make the honor roll. In March the school was temporarily shut down after a fungus buildup in the heating vents led to concern over the building's air quality. Herman W. Levin of International Environmental Services Inc. (IES), which conducted the testing, said the latest results showed bacteria and mold in the air but "not enough to get all worked up about. " He also said, however, the results indicate that the school does have "lousy air. " The testing, which measured carbon dioxide, bacteria and mold in 14 rooms, was conducted April 26 while school was in session.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Reversing a campaign pledge he made in September, President Bush announced yesterday that he would not regulate power plants' emissions of carbon dioxide, which scientists say contributes to global warming. Bush's change in position contradicted the public stance taken recently by Environmental Protection Agency head Christie Whitman. Vice President Cheney, who is directing energy-policy oversight for the new administration, told Republican senators yesterday that promising to regulate carbon dioxide "was a mistake.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Seeking to counter criticism that she is being influenced by big business, Environmental Protection Agency chief Christie Whitman said yesterday that she was committed to cleaning up pollution and will make decisions based on the best research, not politics. Whitman, in her first news conference as EPA administrator, said she had no contact with industry lobbyists on two controversial decisions that have marked the start of her term. The decisions to postpone tighter controls on arsenic in drinking water and to back off a proposal to reduce carbon dioxide pollution were made after she and the White House concluded there was not enough scientific research yet to support the tougher regulations.
NEWS
February 19, 1992 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is the ultimate diplomatic wrestling match - the Earth vs. the United States. At stake is a year-long effort to hammer out a global treaty to curb emissions of industrial and agricultural gases that scientists warn could dramatically change the planet's climate in the 21st century. The battle has been waged for more than a year now, in Washington, Geneva and Nairobi, and is entering its final act at U.N. headquarters here. Virtually every industrialized nation - from Japan to Poland - has agreed there is a need for some sort of limitations on the emission of carbon dioxide, the major greenhouse gas. But the United States has consistently balked at making such a commitment.
NEWS
December 12, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While much of the world faults the United States for not joining a plan to tackle global warming, up to nine Eastern states - including New Jersey and Delaware but not Pennsylvania - are poised this week to take action by themselves. The states would freeze emissions of carbon dioxide from power plants starting in 2009, and then reduce them by 10 percent between 2015 and 2020. Details of the plan, which would have to be adopted separately by each state, are to be announced as soon as Thursday.
NEWS
October 2, 1999 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The son of a Plymouth Township man who died just before neighbors received warnings of high levels of carbon dioxide in their basements says he will have the body exhumed and tested. "Our doctors believe we should have the autopsy done," said John Pergine Jr., whose father, John Sr., died Sept. 23 after living in the basement suite of his son's home in the Kennedy Crossing subdivision for three years. "It's going to be done as soon as possible. " Pergine said yesterday that he was concerned that high levels of carbon dioxide, found in the basements of some neighborhood homes after a young girl passed out Sept.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | THE WASHINGTON POST
HOMER, ALASKA - Kris Holderied, who directs the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Kasitsna Bay Laboratory, says that the ocean's increasing acidity is "the reason fishermen stop me in the grocery store. " "They say, 'You're with the NOAA lab, what are you doing on ocean acidification?' " Holderied said. "This is a coastal town that depends on this ocean, and this bay. " This town in southwestern Alaska dubs itself the Halibut Fishing Capital of the World. But worries about the changing chemical balance of the ocean and its impact on the fish has made an arcane scientific buzzword common parlance here, along with the phrase "corrosive waters.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
An ancient, highly porous form of charcoal is being touted as a godsend for soil health and fertility - transforming farms, home gardens, and urban and suburban landscapes. It might even combat climate change. Any wonder they're calling biochar a "miracle product"? "It's important not to promise too much, but this is mind-popping stuff," says Dale Hendricks, owner of Green Light Plants, a wholesale organic nursery in Landenberg, Chester County, who talks up biochar to public gardens and local garden clubs, and cooks his own in barrels, kilns, and a wood stove.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2008 | By Bob Fernandez and Roslyn Rudolph INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Industrial-gas company Airgas Inc. announced yesterday that it would build a medium-sized liquid-carbon dioxide plant plant in Georgia. The Radnor-based company said in a statement that the new plant, which will be able to process 450 tons of liquid carbon dioxide a day, would enable it to serve customers in the Georgia and Florida markets. The amount of the investment in the project was not released but is expected to cost $8 million to $12 million. Airgas said it had signed a 15-year agreement with the First United Ethanol L.L.C.
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