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Carbon Footprint

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FOOD
February 28, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
We are living, of course, in a carbon era, the evidence of which is not exactly subtle; witness the energy-rating tag on the Bosch dishwasher, the darkening image of "California organic," and, gusting across restaurant tables and grocery aisles, the spirited campaign, winning ground daily, against bottled water. The age's imperatives have supplanted, for the moment at least, the obsession with carbs (so 2005!), and for that matter, fats - except for trans fat - and even organic. "Possessing an excessive carbon footprint," as Michael Specter put it in last week's New Yorker, "is rapidly becoming the modern equivalent of wearing the scarlet letter.
NEWS
May 15, 2012
If you're driving your SUV to the farmer's market to buy local asparagus — and thinking you're making a difference for the planet — not so fast. You're focused on a detail and ignoring the gas-hogging elephant in the room. Likewise, if you're badgering your kids to turn out the lights and the bulbs are still incandescent, you could make more progress — and probably add harmony to your household — if you replaced those old energy-sucking bulbs with efficient ones. As the authors of a new book point out, you'd have to leave the old bulbs off three out of four days to get energy savings comparable to that of CFL or LED bulbs.
NEWS
November 27, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every Sunday, Jane Cespuglio goes to dinner at her parents' house in Richboro. She's there to see family, of course, but she's also on a mission: to plunder her dad's one-acre garden. Like "wildcrafters" in the wilderness foraging for dandelion greens and blackberries, Cespuglio plucks the old man's grapevines and zinnias, basil and rosemary - literally whatever she can get her hands on and around. Later, she transforms them into tabletop arrangements and hand-tied bouquets for Fleurish, the floral design business she started this fall with her sister, Susan Cespuglio-Bigler.
LIVING
November 27, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every Sunday, Jane Cespuglio goes to dinner at her parents' house in Richboro. She's there to see family, of course, but she's also on a mission: to plunder her dad's one-acre garden. Like "wildcrafters" in the wilderness foraging for dandelion greens and blackberries, Cespuglio plucks the old man's grapevines and zinnias, basil and rosemary - literally whatever she can get her hands on and around. Later, she transforms them into tabletop arrangements and hand-tied bouquets for Fleurish, the floral design business she started this fall with her sister, Susan Cespuglio-Bigler.
NEWS
April 29, 2009
It's easier to go green than you might think. And we're here to answer your questions about how to get a green job or live a more green life. A: Try the Energy Coordinating Agency at http://www.eca savesenergy.org, 215-988-0929, or Philadelphia Workforce Development Corporation at http://www . pwdc.org, 215-557-2625. A: You may qualify for financial support to get your house retrofitted to make it more efficient. Talk with the Philadelphia Housing Development Corporation at 215- 448-3000, or go to http://www . phdchousing.
NEWS
October 15, 2010
I JUST READ another article on this bike-lane baloney - and I've had it with the politicians in this city afraid to say to these single, no-kid hipsters that bike lanes just don't fit on our streets. Sorry, Philly just wasn't designed for them. These hipsters always want what they want whether it makes sense or not. And the lamebrains who run the city give it to them because they're afraid to look like they're not trying to save the planet! (Mayor Nutter is a wannabe yuppie hipster.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writer stansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
PHILADELPHIA cyclists, rejoice! City Council's Transportation and Public Utilities Committee approved a bill yesterday that would pave the way for a bike sharing program in Philadelphia The bill, introduced by Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, now moves to Council for a full vote. "Bike sharing will bring Philadelphia to the next level of bike friendliness, sustainability and put us on par with tourism and hospitality destination cities across the world," said Reynolds Brown.
NEWS
November 29, 2007 | Kathleen Parker
Kathleen Parker is a columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group Hey, did you hear the one about the woman who aborted her kid so she could save the planet? That's no joke, but Darwin must be chuckling somewhere. Toni Vernelli was one of two women recently featured in a London Daily Mail story about environmentalists who take their carbon footprint very, very seriously. So seriously, in fact, that Vernelli aborted a pregnancy and, by age 27, had herself sterilized.
FOOD
May 22, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Across from DiBruno Bros. cheeserie near 18th and Chestnut last week, the line was moving smartly at the newest burger joint in town, a fresh-faced interloper called Goodburger. It bills itself as "the best burger in New York," which is rather stretching what the reviews say. But Goodburger is, in fact, a very good burger, and instead of a secret sauce, you get a topping of laser-targeted virtue: Welcome, to the beef burger without tears. No prefrozen beef patty here: It's fresh-ground, "certified, premium Hereford Beef.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Going green in business might seem altruistic. But just like health care, the environmental industry is a business sector - one of the few these recessionary days with growth potential. And those toiling in it hope not only to do some social good, but also to make money in the process. Not that there's anything wrong with that. Or is there? A Web poll last week tried to gauge public sentiment on the greening of capitalism. When asked whether two New York marketers who promote the use of tap water and environmentally friendly bottles they sell are "greedy entrepreneurs," "selfless environmentalists," or "both," respondents gave mixed reviews.
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NEWS
June 9, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writer stansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
PHILADELPHIA cyclists, rejoice! City Council's Transportation and Public Utilities Committee approved a bill yesterday that would pave the way for a bike sharing program in Philadelphia The bill, introduced by Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, now moves to Council for a full vote. "Bike sharing will bring Philadelphia to the next level of bike friendliness, sustainability and put us on par with tourism and hospitality destination cities across the world," said Reynolds Brown.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
THIS IS Monday. Please don't eat meat. I said "please. " If you wanna or you're gonna, I won't take a bite out of you. My favorite legislative body, Philadelphia City Council, unanimously passed a resolution encouraging all within its reach to start each week with a Meatless Monday. (Had it been a Republican idea, it probably would have died, but Republicans aren't often earth- or animal-friendly, as I'll show.) The resolution was pushed by the Humane League, an animal-advocacy group, but its main thrust is that Meatless Monday is good for people . "Meatless" doesn't sound so hard.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
Janice Kenney had always lived in small spaces - rooms, for example, carved out of haylofts and paid for in barter by mucking stables - but it still took her the better part of a year to compress her 62 years of accumulated possessions into a tidy 72 square feet. Now, two years after moving into her grown-up playhouse - a wooden structure on wheels with a peaked roof, tiny porch, sleeping loft, and a few square inches of storage to spare - Kenney said the lifestyle change was entirely worth it. "You feel completely freed up. I had bins and bins of stuff in storage, and I had to move that stuff every time I moved," she said, relaxing in her diminutive dwelling, parked under a tree at the edge of a horse pasture in Kennett Square.
NEWS
May 15, 2012
If you're driving your SUV to the farmer's market to buy local asparagus — and thinking you're making a difference for the planet — not so fast. You're focused on a detail and ignoring the gas-hogging elephant in the room. Likewise, if you're badgering your kids to turn out the lights and the bulbs are still incandescent, you could make more progress — and probably add harmony to your household — if you replaced those old energy-sucking bulbs with efficient ones. As the authors of a new book point out, you'd have to leave the old bulbs off three out of four days to get energy savings comparable to that of CFL or LED bulbs.
NEWS
October 15, 2010
I JUST READ another article on this bike-lane baloney - and I've had it with the politicians in this city afraid to say to these single, no-kid hipsters that bike lanes just don't fit on our streets. Sorry, Philly just wasn't designed for them. These hipsters always want what they want whether it makes sense or not. And the lamebrains who run the city give it to them because they're afraid to look like they're not trying to save the planet! (Mayor Nutter is a wannabe yuppie hipster.
NEWS
October 6, 2010 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Specialty-store owners have a lot to think about when they shop to stock. How many size 2's, 8's, or 16's should they buy? How do they blend funky colors with fledgling designers, while maintaining the store's personality? And when do they buy what may, or may not, be the next fashion craze? (Think skinny cargos or Silly Bandz. Who'd a thunk it?) Buyers for eco-friendly boutiques have to do all that. But they're also looking for pieces with a low carbon footprint, a win-some-lose-some challenge that demands consideration of a constantly evolving manufacturing landscape.
LIVING
November 27, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every Sunday, Jane Cespuglio goes to dinner at her parents' house in Richboro. She's there to see family, of course, but she's also on a mission: to plunder her dad's one-acre garden. Like "wildcrafters" in the wilderness foraging for dandelion greens and blackberries, Cespuglio plucks the old man's grapevines and zinnias, basil and rosemary - literally whatever she can get her hands on and around. Later, she transforms them into tabletop arrangements and hand-tied bouquets for Fleurish, the floral design business she started this fall with her sister, Susan Cespuglio-Bigler.
NEWS
November 27, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every Sunday, Jane Cespuglio goes to dinner at her parents' house in Richboro. She's there to see family, of course, but she's also on a mission: to plunder her dad's one-acre garden. Like "wildcrafters" in the wilderness foraging for dandelion greens and blackberries, Cespuglio plucks the old man's grapevines and zinnias, basil and rosemary - literally whatever she can get her hands on and around. Later, she transforms them into tabletop arrangements and hand-tied bouquets for Fleurish, the floral design business she started this fall with her sister, Susan Cespuglio-Bigler.
NEWS
April 29, 2009
It's easier to go green than you might think. And we're here to answer your questions about how to get a green job or live a more green life. A: Try the Energy Coordinating Agency at http://www.eca savesenergy.org, 215-988-0929, or Philadelphia Workforce Development Corporation at http://www . pwdc.org, 215-557-2625. A: You may qualify for financial support to get your house retrofitted to make it more efficient. Talk with the Philadelphia Housing Development Corporation at 215- 448-3000, or go to http://www . phdchousing.
LIVING
April 22, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clumps of assorted weeds poke through moss-clogged gaps of the old, brick sidewalk on this narrow street. Most people would dismiss the unsightly intruders as more nuisance than anything. Some Roundup should do the job. Or, especially in this Center City neighborhood, the environmentally astute would likely get down on hands and knees, pull the things out, and throw them in the compost heap. But not Lynn Landes. The 56-year-old wife and mother of three surveys her block off Locust with satisfaction.
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