CollectionsCarbon Monoxide Poisoning
IN THE NEWS

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

FEATURED ARTICLES
REAL_ESTATE
February 23, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Cabin fever is taking hold across a huge chunk of the country these days. In communities such as mine, where plowing is what you do to the north 40 in early spring and salt is shaken only on food, confinement because of icy streets and sidewalks can be prolonged. And long-term confinement increases exposure to many household dangers, especially carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas produced when any carbon-based fuel is burned. Quoting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Deborah Hanson of alarm maker First Alert says carbon monoxide poisoning "puts more than 20,000 people in the hospital and is responsible for nearly 450 deaths every year.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When investigators found Leigh Andrews dead in a second-floor West King Street apartment that she had set afire, she was clutching a loaded .44 Magnum. The 29-year-old woman, found early Sunday morning, also had cut her wrists and her throat, apparently feeling despondent and unable to deal with her life, borough Police Chief Christopher Carlile said. The official cause of death was carbon monoxide poisoning. "She had serious psychological issues, and I guess it was too much for her to deal with," Carlile said yesterday.
NEWS
November 2, 1997 | By Jere Downs and Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Two young sisters found dead in a North Philadelphia rowhouse on Friday died of carbon monoxide poisoning, the Medical Examiner's Office determined yesterday. Danielle Armstead, 3, was found dead in a living room chair, and her sister, Angelica, 8, was found in an upstairs bedroom in their home in the 1700 block of North Bouvier Street at about 7:30 p.m. Friday, police said. Yesterday, police said the Medical Examiner's Office said the fumes that killed the girls were caused by gases "backing up from the chimney.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | By Ewart Rouse, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First, her mother went to bed early Monday night with a nasty headache. In the middle of the night, her month-old sister started vomiting. Then, early yesterday, her 14-year-old cousin collapsed on the way to the bathroom. And she and the five other members of the household were complaining of headaches. That's when "I recognized the symptoms, and I got scared myself," 13-year-old Jaitza Rios of Camden recalled yesterday. They called an ambulance. She remembered a similar case from a television show, and quickly concluded that the symptoms were those associated with carbon monoxide poisoning.
NEWS
November 20, 2000 | By Brendan January, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Frank Grady woke up Saturday morning with a sharp headache. Grady, 22, who shares a bottom-floor apartment in a two-story duplex on Walnut Avenue with his landlady, Elizabeth Dewitt, believed he needed fresh air to relieve his headache, and he opened the windows. He ran some errands, but he spent most of the day in the apartment. In the afternoon, he was joined by his brother Jay Grady, 15, and a friend, Mike Rentz. But Grady's headache persisted, and about 5 p.m. he drifted into unconsciousness on a couch.
LIVING
June 27, 1997 | By Denise Cowie, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since Independence Day falls on a Friday this year, the long July 4 weekend could be the liveliest of the summer. And that means that a lot of families will be dragging out the barbecue for the first time since last season. Don't wait to do that until a few minutes before you fire up, especially if you're using a gas grill. Check it out several days in advance - you may need new hoses or connectors. The Barbecue Industry Association suggests that all barbecues that have been stored should be carefully checked out before use. On gas grills, make sure grill tubes are not blocked by insects or food drippings, and check hoses for cracking, brittleness and leaks.
NEWS
March 31, 2001 | Daily News Staff Report
An elderly man and his son were found dead in their Northeast Philadelphia home yesterday morning. The mailman found the family's front door cracked open around 11 a.m. and entered their home, on Fairdale Road near Covert. He found John Butkovic, 93, dead in the living room. His son, John Butkovic, Jr., 63, was dead in a rear bedroom. There were no visible signs of injury to either man. Officials believe they died from carbon monoxide poisoning, but are awaiting the results of an autopsy by the medical examiner's office.
NEWS
September 27, 2011
A 92-year-old Bucks County man caring for his wife, who suffered from advanced Alzheimer's disease, took both their lives Sunday in a murder-suicide, the county coroner said Monday. Charles Hoez and Jeanne Hoez, 90, were found dead Monday morning in their Middletown Township home by their son, said Joseph Campbell. The cause of death was carbon monoxide poisoning, Campbell said. A witness had seen the husband drive his minivan around the side of their house on Sunday afternoon, Campbell said.
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Northwest Philadelphia resident hospitalized because of carbon monoxide poisoning that killed three others and also poisoned her brother was listed in stable condition yesterday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Carlene Hutchinson, 22, was taken to the hospital late Thursday when her rowhouse, in the 8600 block of Fayette Street, became filled with the gas. Her brother, Marlon Hutchinson, 19, had left his 1991 Nissan Maxima running in the basement garage because the battery was weak and he feared the car would not start when he needed to take his girlfriend home.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
February 23, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Cabin fever is taking hold across a huge chunk of the country these days. In communities such as mine, where plowing is what you do to the north 40 in early spring and salt is shaken only on food, confinement because of icy streets and sidewalks can be prolonged. And long-term confinement increases exposure to many household dangers, especially carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas produced when any carbon-based fuel is burned. Quoting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Deborah Hanson of alarm maker First Alert says carbon monoxide poisoning "puts more than 20,000 people in the hospital and is responsible for nearly 450 deaths every year.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Ben Finley and Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writers
(Updated at 12:00 p.m.) The White House on Thursday made the obvious official: The region's epochal ice storm that darkened entire communities, shut down businesses, and turned schools into emergency shelters was, indeed, a certified disaster. With the presidential declaration, Philadelphia and the four suburban Pennsylvania counties became eligible to apply for Federal Emergency Management Agency aid. York and Lancaster Counties also were included. In all, 715,000 Peco Energy customers lost power as a result of the storm - the second-highest total for any one event, said Peco spokesman Ben Armstrong.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Hannah Dreier, Associated Press
PRESCOTT, Ariz. - They remembered the Fourth but also the 19. At Bistro St. Michael on Whiskey Row in this Old West town, 19 candles burned beneath red, white, and blue bunting, one for each firefighter killed last weekend battling a wildfire not far from the place they called home. In a quiet neighborhood near the high school, which at least five of them attended, 19 miniature U.S. flags were planted in front yards, each pole tied with the purple ribbon that commemorates fallen firefighters.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bucks County couple and their two children died of apparent carbon monoxide poisoning Monday when the husband committed suicide by leaving his car running in the garage and the others were overcome by the fumes. According to Pennsylvania state police, troopers responded around 11:20 p.m. to find the four family members - identified as Gary Reitnauer, 59; his wife, Michele, 58; and daughters Kimberly, 16, and Jamie, 10 - inside a residence on Kumry Road in Milford Township. None could be revived, police said.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
A YOUNG WOMAN died from carbon-monoxide poisoning in Upper Darby yesterday morning but her next-door neighbor's carbon monoxide-detector may have saved the lives of the rest of her family. About 4:40 a.m. a resident of Bradford Road reported her carbon-monoxide detector was going off and when firefighters arrived, they found readings at 200 parts per million in the woman's home. Anything more than 25 parts per million is considered dangerous. Firefighters then went next door to a connected but separate residence where readings were 1,400 parts per million, Upper Darby Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood said.
NEWS
September 27, 2011
A 92-year-old Bucks County man caring for his wife, who suffered from advanced Alzheimer's disease, took both their lives Sunday in a murder-suicide, the county coroner said Monday. Charles Hoez and Jeanne Hoez, 90, were found dead Monday morning in their Middletown Township home by their son, said Joseph Campbell. The cause of death was carbon monoxide poisoning, Campbell said. A witness had seen the husband drive his minivan around the side of their house on Sunday afternoon, Campbell said.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hurricane Irene's death toll increased by two Wednesday after Maine officials released the names of an elderly Lafayette Hill couple who died of apparent carbon monoxide poisoning from an emergency generator at their summer home at Sebago Lake. Lewis S. Somers III, 85, and his wife, Elizabeth, 84, of Foxhound Drive, were discovered Tuesday inside their house in Raymond, where a propane generator in the basement was running because the storm that roared through Maine on Sunday knocked out electricity for more than 48 hours on their lakeside cove.
NEWS
May 24, 2011
Rec facilities go smokeless Mayor Nutter yesterday signed an executive order that all city recreation centers, playgrounds and pools are to be smoke-free. The ban, which covers 200 facilities, includes outdoor spaces. The policy is to take effect on July 1, and 1,000 signs will be posted at city facilities to alert people that they can't light up. Thousands of wallet-sized information cards will also be distributed with details on the policy and information on how to get help quitting.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|