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NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Ovetta Wiggins, Special to The Inquirer
With the new year comes a new mission for Robin Bartok. The woman who steered the Delran Citizens Against the Hartford Road Recycling Center and fought to tell the residents of Delran Township the positive aspects of reusing bottles, cans and paper is heading a new project - the recycling of cardboard boxes. "It's something that's going to hit the whole county eventually," said Bartok, Delran's recycling coordinator. "We're just trying to be a step ahead. " Delran is one of five townships in Burlington County that has implemented the corrugated cardboard project.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1989 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, West Germans worried about how they would contend with an invasion from the East. They thought the hostile hordes would come in heavily armored Soviet tanks, crashing through the farmland and racing across the North German Plain. Instead, the invaders came chugging across the border and limping down the autobahns in Trabants, the rickety passenger cars manufactured in East Germany. Unofficially, the "Trabi" already is being called "the car of the year" here in West Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1993 | By T. Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story includes information from the Associated Press, USA Today, the Washington Post and Reuters
Somebody wanted John F. Kennedy Jr., or at least a life-size cardboard cutout of the dapper young lawyer. The cardboard Kennedy was stolen last weekend from the convention floor in Miami Beach, where the American Booksellers Association was having its annual meeting. The cutout was on display to promote the unauthorized biography of Kennedy, Prince Charming, written by Wendy Leigh, that will hit the shelves in November. CHARLES AND MADONNA, PART 2 Basketball's bad boy Charles Barkley has confirmed reports that he indeed did meet the queen of bad girls, Madonna, in a Phoenix restaurant recently.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1991 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are calling it Phoenix, this printing and manufacturing plant in a West Deptford industrial park, a not-so-subtle allusion to the trouble that nearly consumed it and from which it now hopes to rise. Before last week, when it became Phoenix Display & Packaging Corp., it was Associated Packaging Industries. It was and still is an innovative leader in the obscure but growing business of full-color printing on corrugated cardboard. That may sound like a little-needed skill, but look around the next time you are in a movie lobby, drugstore or grocery.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | By MARK RANDALL
I know that St. Patrick's Day was not invented so that I could experience race shame, but I find that if I think about it in this way, as a sort of Lenten penance, I can get through. I am enough of a genetic mongrel, really, to claim an ancestor from most of the NATO countries, but my mother being half-Irish, and my middle name being, well, Patrick, I was happy enough in my youth to view Irish as the dominant component and on March 17 would don a green sweater, mouth a couple of jovial "Erin go braghs" to my fellow spuds and let it go at that.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
City officials are hoping to cut recycling costs beginning in August when a pilot program to recycle cardboard is initiated. Under a one-year contract, entered this month with Smurfit Recycling of Philadelphia, residents will be asked to separate cardboard boxes - including cereal boxes - from their trash. Containers for liquids such as milk or juice will not be included in the program. The cardboard will be taken to the facility in Philadelphia, where it will be recycled and sold for making new boxes.
REAL_ESTATE
April 30, 1993 | By Al Carrell, FOR THE INQUIRER
When doors stick, you can fix them without a lot of trouble, in most cases. The problem is usually a hinge that needs tightening or loosening. Here's how to find and fix the problem: First, look at the door to see where the problem is. Close the door and slip a thin piece of cardboard between the door and the jamb. Slide it around the egdes and you'll feel it stick where the door is binding. Once you've found the problem area, you can figure out how to fix it. If the door is binding near the bottom, you can probably alleviate the problem by tightening the top hinge a bit. The opposite is true if the door is binding at the top. If the hinge is tightened as far as it can be, or tightening it doesn't do the trick, try placing a shim under the other hinge.
NEWS
October 4, 1996 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When 22-year-old Dave Hall decided to run for state representative against a seven-term incumbent, he put on his boxing gloves, expecting politics to be rough. Since launching his underfunded, seat-of-the-pants campaign for the 178th District, however, Hall says he has done nothing but shadowbox. Hall has called for a series of debates, a campaign-spending limit, and various discussions with community groups. His opponent, Republican Roy Reinard, has ignored him. "I expected that there'd be more interaction between the candidates," said Hall, who is itching to show off his debating skills.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | BY DAVE BARRY
We're moving again. We're not going far: Maybe two miles, as the heat- seeking radar-equipped South Florida Stealth Mosquito flies. It's hard to explain why we're doing this. Call it a crazy whim. We just woke up one morning and said, "I know! Let's put everything we own into boxes!" And that's what we're doing. The giant cardboard mines of Peru are working overtime to meet our box needs, because we have a lot of stuff that we need to take, including many precious heirlooms such as our calculator in which all the keys work perfectly except the "4," and our complete, mint-condition set of 1978 Visa statements (try replacing those at today's prices)
SPORTS
May 12, 2005 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Gino Inverso's parents braced themselves for those turbulent teenage years. Turns out, Hurricane Gino never emerged, but Happy and Humble Gino did. Parents Neil and Teri Inverso could have weathered that storm in a cardboard canoe. "I'm extremely proud," Teri said. "He's a happy kid. I kind of held my breath for that rough time, and it never came. He balances it all well and is really humble. " Inverso, a junior at Council Rock South, gets A's and B's in his advanced-placement and honors courses.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
I met Matt while reporting Wednesday's column on the rising number of young people lost in heroin addiction and living on the streets of Philadelphia. He sat on a crate on Market Street with a sign saying he was a veteran, and any help would be a blessing. I sat down beside him to talk. I had met a dozen or so homeless , addicted young people as I reported the column. When I'm reporting, I find the best people to talk to are the watchers. The ones who seem to set themselves apart - who contemplate life while they experience it. People who may be lost in the tide, but taking it all in even as they drown.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2016 | Jennifer Adams, For The Inquirer
Q: My basement flooded this weekend, and I don't know whether I should throw away or keep the boxes I was using to store books, clothing, etc. My wife thinks we should throw it all away - she has wanted to get rid of it for years - but some of this stuff is from my childhood. And what should we do about the carpet?    - W.B. A: Oh, no. Sorry to hear about this mess. As you know, basements are great for storage. At the same time, we hold on to boxes simply because we have the space.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Forget the oversize video screens, the thundering music, the light show, and the scores of sexy dancers. What matters to illusionist Andrew Basso, one of the seven headliners in the stage extravaganza The Illusionists: Witness the Impossible , is the intimate connection he develops with the people, usually wide-eyed and open-mouthed, who see him do his thing. "I love the live audience," Basso said during a recent visit to South Street Magic Shop in Center City. "Magic transmits something to the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Biographical drama is a tricky enterprise. When a biography centers on a pivotal moment in a life, ( End of the Rainbow , The Mountaintop , Amadeus ) it's perhaps most effective. But when the approach to that life is a chapter-by-chapter memory play, as with Carson Kreitzer's frustratingly didactic Behind the Eye , receiving an equally frustrating production by Gas & Electric Arts, the result - despite nudity and R-rated language - can feel an awful lot like a lecture.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
Izhar Gafni, an Israeli inventor, was in a bike shop discussing his passion one day when the discussion turned to a man who had invented a cardboard canoe. Gafni left the shop, but couldn't get the idea of a cardboard canoe out of his head. "Bicycle is sort of my hobby," Gafni said in a video that's become a hit on the Internet. "It's what I do in my free time. It's in my soul. " "Suddenly, it just struck my mind," Gafni continued. "Why not make a bicycle out of cardboard?"
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | BY NATALIE POMPILIO, pompiln@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
THEY GATHERED yesterday on Mutter Street in North Philadelphia to remember their friend Reina, whose life was ended Monday by an executioner's bullets. There was sadness and anger, but one emotion underlay it all: Fear. "No photos of faces! Look what happened last time!" one neighbor scolded as news photographers crowded the scene. "They're going to keep killing people! There's no one to protect us. " Friends believe that store clerk Rosemary Fernandez Rivera, 33, better known as Reina Aguirre Alonso, was murdered because her killer thought she was a witness to an earlier homicide in the neighborhood.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | BY NATALIE POMPILIO, pompiln@phillynews.com215-854-2595
They gathered Wednesday on Mutter Street in North Philadelphia to remember their friend Reina, whose life was ended Monday by an executioner's bullets. There was sadness and anger, but one emotion underlay it all: Fear. "No photos of faces! Look what happened last time!" one neighbor scolded as news photographers crowded the scene. "They're going to keep killing people! There's no one to protect us. " Friends believe store clerk Rosemary Fernandez Rivera, 33, better known as Reina Aguirre Alonso, was murdered because her killer thought she was a witness to an earlier homicide in the neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
It rises 16 feet in the air, stretching toward the skylighted ceiling of the studio in Old Tarble Hall on the Swarthmore College campus. It is black and creepy. Skeletal fingers reach out toward anyone passing by. Beheaded bodies rise from the top and disembodied arms float near the center. A foot-long scalpel thrusts out, arming a confident Dr. Samuel Gross, the same Samuel Gross memorialized in Thomas Eakins' great 1875 painting, The Gross Clinic . But in this Swarthmore rendering, Dr. Gross has heft and weight.
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The seventh day of Occupy Philadelphia got off to a quiet start, with rain falling lightly on the more than 100 still zipped-up tents. But keeping protesters inside, as rush-hour traffic was splashing by, wasn't the weather so much as the need for sleep. The mini-city was alive late into the night with socializing and social-policy discussions, said Adam Hill, 28, a self-styled "failing independent contractor" from Norristown. "A lot of new people showed up," said Hill, who arrived himself last evening and didn't crash until about 4 a.m. That's about when the tent next to him went up, at the southwest corner of City Hall's Dilworth Plaza.
NEWS
September 30, 2011 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inclusion in a big, beautiful book called Furniture With Soul: Master Woodworkers and Their Craft (Kodansha International) can make the typical woodworker a bit sheepish, a bit more inclined to opine about curly oak than metaphysics. But to drop in on the two Philadelphia-area furniture makers among the 20 in the book - Jack Larimore out in rural somewhere-near-Bridgeton, N.J., and Michael Hurwitz, still in a street-level studio on Third near Market, but headed to Fishtown - is to be drawn in by their intensity, their devotion to creating, their contemplative approach to their craft.
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