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Cardiac Arrest

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NEWS
April 25, 2008 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Max King is no fan of sensationalism, but he relishes declaring, "I literally died. " The former journalist and just-retired president of the Heinz Endowments, one of the nation's largest independent philanthropies, was speaking to Pittsburgh civic leaders at the Carnegie Museum of Art 18 months ago when his heart suddenly stopped beating. After he collapsed, six people sprang into action, performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and restoring his heartbeat with an automated external defibrillator.
SPORTS
October 28, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Sao Caetano defender Serginho died yesterday after collapsing during a soccer match in Sao Paolo, Brazil. The 30-year-old player likely suffered cardiac arrest, doctor Marco Aurelio Cunha said. The official cause of death was not immediately released. Serginho collapsed away from the play 59 minutes into the match against Sao Paulo at Morumbi Stadium. Players from both teams quickly called for medical assistance when Serginho fell unconscious inside Sao Caetano's penalty box. Doctors rushed to the field and attempted to revive him. Serginho was still unconscious when he was taken to Hospital Sao Luiz in Sao Paulo, doctors said.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
They were all charged with "crimes of the heart" and sentenced to serve their time behind the bars of a plywood jail. The 11 inmates were under "cardiac arrest" by the American Heart Association and were imprisoned at the Towne House Restaurant, Media, until they raised at least $300 "bail" each. The event was sponsored by the Delaware County Council of the Heart Association and the Frankford Trust Co. The money raised - more than $4,000 - will benefit the American Heart Association's medical research and educational programs, according to Cathy Everline, a field director for the organization.
NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cooling the body is the one practice that has been shown to reduce brain injury after resuscitation for cardiac arrest. Yet "therapeutic hypothermia" is rarely used on patients who are already hospitalized when their hearts stop, according to a study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers. Disappointing as that may sound, interpreting the findings is difficult. Outside the hospital, cardiac arrest - complete stoppage of the heart, which can be fatal within minutes - is usually caused by a heart-related problem.
NEWS
June 2, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A major study led by Cooper University Hospital suggests a new way to improve dismal survival rates after cardiac arrest: Turn down the patient's oxygen. Stinting on oxygen may seem counterintuitive, since the brain begins to die when deprived of oxygen-rich blood for more than five minutes. But studies in dogs and in premature infants have long shown that too much oxygen can be harmful. The new study, published in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Association, is the first solid evidence that this vital gas is also a double-edged therapy after the heart suddenly stops - as it does in 220,000 Americans every year.
SPORTS
December 15, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Jed Bedford, a prolific three-point shooter who captained Columbus (Ga.) State's basketball team, died yesterday about an hour after collapsing during a practice. Bedford, 21, was taken to St. Francis Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The Muscogee County Coroner told university officials that cardiac arrest was the cause of death. "One of my greatest fears as a coach was realized today," Columbus State coach Herbert Greene said. "These players are like family to me and to each other.
SPORTS
May 24, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Washington State women's basketball coach June Daugherty was upgraded from critical to serious condition yesterday, a day after going into cardiac arrest while at a medical clinic for a checkup. The 50-year-old Daugherty was "doing as well as can be expected," said Mike Daugherty, her husband and the team's associate head coach. The Daughertys are the parents of 13-year-old twins. Fired by Washington, Daugherty was hired last month at Washington State. She took over a program that has not had a winning season since 1995-96.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allison MacMath had no medical training. But on a cold morning in February, when a man beside her at the dog park suddenly collapsed to the snow, she remembered a simple tip: When giving CPR, skip mouth-to-mouth, and pump to the beat of an aptly named Bee Gees song. As she leaned against his chest, she said, she sang in her head, but out loud at the hook, "Stayin' alive. Stayin' alive," willing him to hear her. The man's wife comforted him with her own words. "Mostly, 'I love you, Frank, I love you,' " MacMath remembered Saturday, turning to Frank Norris, the man whose life she helped save.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the paramedics reached Frank Rizzo, lying on the floor of the bathroom in his Center City campaign headquarters, his face was blue and his arms were pale. He had no pulse. He was not breathing. His heart was beating erratically. He was, doctors would later say, in a "state of full cardiac arrest. " In Philadelphia, according to city Emergency Medical Services statistics, the chances of such a person surviving are only about 6 percent. "The odds are against a patient pulling out of cardiac arrest," said Dr. Joseph Zeccardi, director of the emergency department at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, where Rizzo was taken.
NEWS
April 25, 2008 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Max King is no fan of sensationalism, but he relishes declaring, "I literally died. " The former journalist and current head of the Heinz Endowments, one of the nation's largest independent philanthropies, was speaking to Pittsburgh civic leaders at the Carnegie Museum of Art 18 months ago when his heart suddenly stopped beating. After he collapsed, six people sprang into action, performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and restoring his heartbeat with an automated external defibrillator.
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NEWS
July 1, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FRANK VEGA'S life was a mess. A serious heroin addict, drug peddler, jail bird, suicidal. In other words, a hopeless case, like so many in the dreary inner-city neighborhoods that harbor society's dregs. But something happened to Frank Vega while he was serving a 19-month sentence on drug charges in Holmesburg Prison. He had a dream. He saw broken people, like him, going into buildings and coming out restored. He believed it was a message from God, telling him he'd better do something for the people in his community, the ones he had for so long simply exploited for his own selfish gain.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles P. Steckel Jr., 84, of Broomall, a teacher and longtime vice principal at the former Monsignor Bonner High School, died Monday, June 8, of cardiac arrest at St. Martha's Manor in Downingtown. Mr. Steckel, a resident of Broomall for more than 35 years, was known for his kindness, generosity, and dry sense of humor. Born and reared in Allentown, the oldest of 12 children, Mr. Steckel told wonderful stories about growing up in such a large family. He worked for Western Electric Co. for two years after graduation from Allentown Central Catholic High School.
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
One of the most mind-blowing musicians of all time, jazz great Ornette Coleman, 85, died of cardiac arrest Thursday in New York. From the beginning, Mr. Coleman was an energetic innovator intent on moving the music forward. The saxophonist, who was raised in Fort Worth, Texas, and played early on with Pee Wee Crayton's band - Crayton is famously supposed to have paid him "not to play" - and a Silas Green From New Orleans tent show, started off his solo career in 1958, leading a band that featured trumpeter Don Cherry on the appropriately titled Something Else!
SPORTS
May 8, 2015 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
UP UNTIL EARLY Tuesday morning, I had looked at Ernie Johnson as the geeky guy on TNT who did an absolutely terrific job keeping Charles, Kenny and Shaq under control. In a span of less than 24 hours, my respect for Johnson reached a level that I cannot comprehend. At 2 a.m. on Tuesday, I watched an episode of ESPN's E:60 in which Johnson was featured. So I watched, and cried. Since becoming the face of Turner Sports in 1990, Johnson has faced some major dilemmas. There was cancer in 2006, which he beat; there was the death of his father in 2011, which he still beats himself up for not being there when Dad died; and then there was Michael.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
RACERS HAVE plenty to focus on during a 10-mile run. How to keep a man's heart beating and lungs pumping isn't usually one of them. But that's exactly what a group of about 12 health-care workers competing in the Broad Street Run went through on Sunday when one of their own collapsed right in front of them. Thanks to their efforts, that 31-year-old man is alive today. After seeing their colleague off in an ambulance, those lifesavers all went on to finish the race. "People stopped out of the kindness of their hearts as soon as he went down," said Kristen, a physician's assistant who didn't want her last name published.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AS 40,000 RUNNERS barreled down Broad Street, four law-enforcement officials were in a race of their own. The prize was more than a medal and bragging rights - it was a man's life. FBI Special Agents Erik Negron, Tom Powell and Brian Hoffman, as well as Philadelphia Police Officer Matthew Fleming, took action Sunday morning during the Broad Street Run, working together to revive a 35-year-old man, one of two runners who had gone into cardiac arrest, authorities said last night. It happened in a split-second, according to Special Agent J.J. Klaver, an FBI spokesman.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
A "DEPRAVED HEART. " Who knew the quaint-sounding phrase - it sounds pulled from a Bronte novel - was an actual legal term? But Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby used it yesterday to describe the second-degree murder charge brought against one of the officers in the death of Freddie Gray. Officer Caesar Goodson Jr. allegedly acted with a "depraved heart" when he recklessly drove the van that transported Gray, who was not secured with a seatbelt, to the police station after a bogus arrest.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allison MacMath had no medical training. But on a cold morning in February, when a man beside her at the dog park suddenly collapsed to the snow, she remembered a simple tip: When giving CPR, skip mouth-to-mouth, and pump to the beat of an aptly named Bee Gees song. As she leaned against his chest, she said, she sang in her head, but out loud at the hook, "Stayin' alive. Stayin' alive," willing him to hear her. The man's wife comforted him with her own words. "Mostly, 'I love you, Frank, I love you,' " MacMath remembered Saturday, turning to Frank Norris, the man whose life she helped save.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene V. Alessandroni II, 77, of Chestnut Hill, a career prosecutor in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office, died Tuesday, Nov. 25, of cardiac arrest at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Alessandroni, known as "Gene," was the son of Walter E. and Ethel Alessandroni. His father, then state attorney general, had received the Republican Party's endorsement for lieutenant governor. He, his wife, and two others were headed to a campaign appearance on May 8, 1966, when their twin-engine plane crashed near Somerset, leaving no survivors.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer and Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writers
Ambulances and two helicopters were dispatched to the fire at the home of Cooper University Health System's chief executive and his wife during a significant attempt to save the couple last month, according to a dispatch log released to The Inquirer on Wednesday. John P. Sheridan Jr. and his wife, Joyce, were unresponsive when pulled Sept. 28 from the second-story master bedroom in the home in the Skillman section of Montgomery Township, Somerset County, N.J. As medics tried to revive both, rescue teams continued searching for another victim, possibly a son who also lived there.
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