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NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Diane Marie Turner, 66, of Upper Darby, whose dedication to American troops included sending care packages to those deployed abroad, died Tuesday, Sept. 24, of heart failure at her home. She had not been ill, her family said. Many years ago, the former Diane Marie DiValerio helped form the Upper Darby Marine Corps League Detachment No. 884 of Upper Darby Ladies Auxiliary. She was a past president. In 2003, she started a program in which the auxiliary sent hundreds of cartons filled with comfort items for the troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
September 30, 1991
If you have an image burned into your mind of starving little European kids being fed and clothed from CARE packages from the United States, you are probably both a good person and one old enough to remember the noblest action our nation ever took. Forget it. It's a lot more likely the largesse is going to have to flow the other way. Without a war to cause the problem. While we Americans were squandering our wealth fighting the Red Menace (something we still do, even though the Red Menace is so obsolete it wouldn't even make a good name for a wrestler)
NEWS
November 29, 2007 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christmas in Iraq? Joe Villani tried to imagine what it would feel like to more than 100,000 American troops separated from their loved ones at the holidays, and he knew he had to help. So when Lockheed Martin in Moorestown, where he works, began an in-house campaign to collect gifts for the soldiers this month, Villani kicked into high gear. The Navy veteran, his wife and their teenage son and daughter reached beyond the office to more than 500 people in the Moorestown Soccer Club.
NEWS
July 15, 2007 | By Pete Kennedy FOR THE INQUIRER
In 2003, Joyce Kline began sending care packages to the Army unit with which her son-in-law, Sgt. Bill Horn, was stationed in Afghanistan. Since than, she has collected and shipped these packages to 14 military units serving in that country and Iraq. On Saturday, she'll welcome everyone who has helped her in this effort to "Operation Military Care Package Day" at Hibernia United Methodist Church in Coatesville. She'll also gladly accept donations of material to be shipped to the troops.
NEWS
February 9, 2003 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No longer can schools, churches and charitable groups mail care packages of goodies to our soldiers overseas. And no longer can Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts send U.S. troops letters and treats. The longtime practice of sending mail to "Any Service Member" ended with the anthrax contamination of mail in 2001. The U.S. Defense Department immediately stopped forwarding correspondence and packages from the public. That left the job to the United Service Organizations - now financially struggling to keep up with the needs of tens of thousands of mobilized troops.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | By JACK KRAUSS
The other morning my wife rolled over sleepily - 5:30 a.m. - and whispered, "Is the coffee ready yet, hon?" "Sure, it's automatic now, remember?" I answered, "We got that coffeemaker. " "Oh, that's right," she mumbled and turned back over. Then, as an afterthought, she giggled, "Guess I don't need you for that anymore. " "Guess not," I said, pretending to grumble. I got out of bed 10 minutes later and went downstairs to the kitchen, wondering just how much of my grumble was pretense.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1996 | By Kent Steinriede, FOR THE INQUIRER
George Ball pulled eight Italian bean seeds from his pocket and placed seven of them on his desk. "This will produce several hundred of its kind in four months," he said of the one seed still in his hand. And the yield of those hundreds of seeds will feed many hungry people. The nature of seeds and the seed business put Ball and W. Atlee Burpee & Co., of Warminster, in an unusual position when it comes to helping Third World nations with shrinking food supplies. "In the seed business, you always build a surplus," said Ball, Burpee's CEO. "That very overage can be used to heal a country.
NEWS
June 20, 2004 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Saying good-bye to her 20-year-old son as he left for Baghdad in March was "the hardest thing I've ever done in my life," said Paula Zimmerman of Folcroft. Right away, she and her family started sending letters and care packages to her older son, Army Pfc. Kevin Zimmerman, a graduate of Academy Park High School. But when she learned that some soldiers in his company - Crazyhorse Company, First Battalion, 12th Calvary Regiment - didn't have family to provide emotional support or even a letter or postcard, "it just bothered me," Zimmerman said.
NEWS
July 22, 2004
RE THE letter from Kate Hurster, who has yet to hear a response to the soldiers who are against the war: She's not looking. As long as people like Michael Moore and the news media continue to use the demise of our fallen heroes to affect the outcome of the November election, the only way to get more than one side of the story is to seek it out yourself. I have written letters, baked cookies and sent care packages to our military all over the world. The things that stand out in my mind are quite different.
NEWS
January 22, 2003
IN HIS Jan. 16 commentary, Michael Smerconish asks why the American Friends Service Committee plans to send care packages of soap to Iraq. Are we traitors? Nuts? Misguided? For more than 85 years, the work of the Service Committee has been synonymous with building peace in troubled regions of the world. Through two world wars - when Friends aided Jews and Germans - more than 1 million children were fed daily. When racial hysteria caused thousands of U.S. citizens to be uprooted and exiled to internment camps, we worked against the injustice.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Diane Marie Turner, 66, of Upper Darby, whose dedication to American troops included sending care packages to those deployed abroad, died Tuesday, Sept. 24, of heart failure at her home. She had not been ill, her family said. Many years ago, the former Diane Marie DiValerio helped form the Upper Darby Marine Corps League Detachment No. 884 of Upper Darby Ladies Auxiliary. She was a past president. In 2003, she started a program in which the auxiliary sent hundreds of cartons filled with comfort items for the troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I have an aging father with a health condition that is likely terminal, with few treatment options. I live far away from him and my mother, and my half-siblings don't make much of an effort to see him. My parents are left with little social support and so many painful unknowns. My mother especially has completely neglected her own health in caring for him. I've been turning myself inside out, using all my spare vacation time to see them (the only thing that seems to help their spirits)
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SHE WAS CALLED "Florence Nightingale. " And Lorraine Teresa Dade-Trumpler earned the title. Like the 19th-century English nurse, whose name has become synonymous with helping the ill and needy, Lorraine dedicated much of her life to easing the pain of the sick and shut-ins in her city. As a mother of Jones Temple Church of God in Christ, in North Philadelphia, of which her late husband was pastor, Lorraine spread her concern among children and adults, using her considerable cooking and baking skills to feed the hungry and taking flowers and gifts to those who needed a touch of love.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Keira Knightley , 27, makes a dangerous claim in the March issue of Marie Claire: The world of movies, fashion, and TV isn't real . It's not substantial. Not worth dying for. "My career is on the verge of being ridiculous all the time," Keira says. "It's all smoke and mirrors. " Keira, who has played many women of substance in the pics, including Tolstoy' s Anna Karenina, Freud muse Sabina Spielrein , Austen 's Elizabeth Bennet, and King Arthur 's Guinevere , says showbiz is a "very insecure profession.
SPORTS
November 28, 2012
RUNNING BACKS as big as Bryce Brown, who is 6-foot and 225 pounds, aren't supposed to be as fast as Bryce Brown.  They aren't supposed to be able to run a 4.37 40-yard dash like Brown did at the predraft workout that convinced the Eagles to take a seventh-round flier on a kid who quit two college programs and entered the draft with just 104 college carries.  And they aren't supposed to get to a corner and turn it and have an entire defense eat...
NEWS
November 12, 2012
JERUSALEM - Israel was drawn into the fighting in neighboring Syria for the first time Sunday, firing warning shots across the border after an errant mortar shell landed near an Israeli military installation in the Golan Heights. While Israel appeared eager to calm the situation, its response was a potent reminder of how easily the Syrian civil war - already spilling across borders with Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan - could explode into a wider regional conflagration. Israel has little love for President Bashar Assad, who has provided refuge and support to Israel's bitterest enemies through the years.
NEWS
October 10, 2012
Through Oct. 17, Philly.com and The Inquirer will mark breast cancer awareness month by publishing a profile a day of transformative moments reported by patients. The series culminates in a special Philly.com/Inquirer/Daily News section Oct. 18, and can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer . Perhaps it was luck, fate, or a blessing, but weeks before being diagnosed with breast cancer, Karen Weiss read a book by Corrie Ten Boom called The Hiding Place . Weiss was amazed how the faith of the author, who hid Dutch Jews from the Nazis, grew only stronger as horrors mounted.
NEWS
June 11, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They left for training a year ago and spent the last nine months in Iraq. They guarded detainees, provided convoy security, and helped guide Iraq's transition to a fledgling republic. Now every member of the 50th Infantry Brigade Combat Team - more than 2,800 soldiers - has come home, safe and sound, to a hero's welcome. With Blackhawk helicopters circling overhead and artillery booming nearby, the soldiers will march a mile tomorrow morning from the Statehouse in downtown Trenton to Sovereign Bank Arena, where they will be thanked during ceremonies.
NEWS
March 19, 2008 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In October, when Army Sgt. Mingo Byrd, a graduate of Philadelphia's Olney High School, called to tell his mother he was being sent to Iraq for the third time - another 15 long months - she handled the news with her customary patience and strength. That's how he remembers it. And that's how Namorah Byrd wants it. But inside, she says, she was coming undone. "My heart sank," recalled the Philadelphia resident, who teaches English at Gloucester County College. "I felt numb when I hung up the phone, emotionally frozen.
NEWS
March 6, 2008
No signs of horse abuse at Valley Forge I was distressed to read the article referencing alleged horse abuse at Valley Forge Military Academy and College ("Horse-abuse charges denied at academy," Feb. 26). I have been riding there on a regular basis for over a year, and my observations and experience are exactly the opposite. I have never seen any signs of abuse, neglect or mistreatment at any time. To the contrary, I have been very impressed by how well the staff cares for and treats the horses.
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