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NEWS
May 7, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Ron Cortes
The Learning for Life Career Fair for high school students was held yesterday at the CoreStates Center. The Cradle of Liberty Council, Boy Scouts of America, said 80 corporations and other organizations would be represented.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It is typical of the deadpan wit and acid insight of Billy Wilder's Sunset Boulevard that the entire film is narrated by a corpse. The body is floating in a swimming pool, and Wilder's mordant demolition of the Hollywood dream factory and its bizarre custodians was also a reflection of Gloria Swanson's waning career when she took the role of faded silent star Norma Desmond in 1950. Swanson was 52 at the time and Wilder gave her the part only after Mae West, Pola Negri and Mary Pickford declined.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A conference for blacks and Hispanics interested in careers in science and mathematics will be held tonight and tomorrow at Lincoln University in southern Chester County. Students at all Philadelphia-area high schools are invited to attend. Among the speakers are Rosalyn Yalow, winner of the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1977, who will give the keynote address at 9 a.m. tomorrow. Other speakers include Rustum Roy of Penn State University; Niara Sudarkasa, president of Lincoln University; Thomas Smith of Howard University, and Carl Mansfield of Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The difference between the careers of educators Ruth Wright Hayre and Dora W. Campbell can be measured in time and isms. Hayre could not get a job as a secondary school teacher in Philadelphia when she graduated from college in the early 1930s. She was black and a woman. Forty years later, the baggage of racism and sexism would be lighter for Campbell. But not light enough that she didn't seek mentoring and moral support from others like her. Campbell's help came from the Black Women's Educational Alliance (BWEA)
NEWS
March 30, 2004 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Local writer Bruce Graham has been writing for the stage for 20 years, and, for most of that time, he has also been writing scripts for movies and television. With these two careers going simultaneously, it appeared inevitable that, sooner or later, Graham would either write a play about Hollywood or a movie about the theater. The play has arrived first. According to Goldman, given its world premiere by the Philadelphia Theatre Company, is an engaging mix of Graham's two careers.
LIVING
May 16, 1995 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
They know their stuff, these people on the Republican presidential campaign trail. How to respond to disasters. How to regulate financial markets. How to steer federal money to public television. And they may never get to use this know-how. They are not the candidates for president. They are the candidates' wives. More than ever before, the field of potential first ladies in the Republican Party includes women who have their own careers, their own professional identities.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Robert Lyman Thayer Sr., 83, whose varied career included public relations, his own business and social work, died Sunday of heart-related problems in the medical facility of the Brittany Pointe Estates retirement community in Upper Gwynedd Township. He had resided in Trooper, then in Lower Salford Township before moving to the retirement community six years ago. Mr. Thayer worked in public relations for General Electric Co. in Schenectady, N.Y., then owned and operated a chain-link fence business in the Florida Keys.
NEWS
March 9, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Careers in technology will be the focus of a fair from 5:30 to 8 p.m. next Thursday at Delaware County Community College, Route 252 and Media Line Road, Marple Township. Careers to be highlighted include allied health, electronics, telecommunications, graphic design, computer-assisted design, construction, architecture, computer repair and composite materials. Companies participating in the fair include Fidelity Bank, SEPTA, Philadelphia Electric Co., IBM, Wang Laboratories, Boeing Helicopter and Du Pont Co. The fair is free and open to the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1994 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Friends and fans of the Curtis Institute must have been feeling good on Monday when two students made auspicious debuts with the Concerto Soloists Chamber Orchestra at the Walnut Street Theatre. Ignat Solzhenitsyn, heard in October playing piano with the chamber group, led them in a program of Handel, Beethoven and David Diamond that evening, filling in for indisposed emeritus conductor Max Rudolf. Solzhenitsyn's piano soloist Monday evening was 18-year-old Curtis colleague Ye Zhu. Fine careers appear justified for both, given the confidence and joyousness of their musicmaking.
NEWS
June 7, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When he was 61 in 1975, Gil Scheetz decided he needed a bit more education. Way back in 1932, his formal education had ended with a Bucks County high school graduation. So he went to four nearby colleges and, by the time he was 69, had earned four degrees. And then he began yet another career. On May 12, Gilbert A. Scheetz, 94, a man of several accomplishments, died of colon cancer at his home in Sellersville. Mr. Scheetz graduated from the Consolidated Sellersville-Perkasie High School the year after it opened, and was a lineman on its 1931 football team.
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SPORTS
September 9, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
MIAMI - On Thursday, for the second time in three days, the Phillies will start a pitcher who has attempted to reclaim his career with the addition of a two-seam fastball. Alec Asher, who will start Thursday in Washington, was told by the Phillies at the end of last season that he needed to learn how to throw a two-seamer. The sinker, manager Pete Mackanin said, gives a needed second look. Asher rode the pitch to great success in the minors this season before he was suspended for 80 games in June after testing positive for a performance-enhancing drug.
NEWS
August 30, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - At 28, Jennifer Storm came face to face with her past. She had just become executive director of the Dauphin County Victim/Witness Assistance Program, and her first case involved the rape of a 12-year-old girl. Storm herself had been raped at 12, by a 28-year-old stranger on the way to a roller rink, and suddenly she saw her ordeal in a new light. "I can't even begin to explain how much that little girl gave me," Storm, 41, said in an interview Tuesday. "I had never felt more confident in my life's mission.
NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By Les Bowen, STAFF WRITER
THE EAGLES drafted eight players in 2007, five before they took Brent Celek 162nd overall, two after choosing Celek in the fifth round. None of the other seven players the team assembled then still plays football for a living. "I think it's been a few years" since anyone else in his Eagles draft class played in the NFL, Celek said this week. He's right - second-round quarterback Kevin Kolb and third-round linebacker Stewart Bradley both finished their careers in 2012. Everyone else was done before that.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Keith Zakarin has a tough argument to make, but that is, after all, what lawyers are paid to do. Zakarin is a partner at Center City's Duane Morris, where he chairs a practice group that represents more than a hundred career schools and colleges and industry groups. The firm is one of a handful nationwide that have made the sector a thriving, profitable practice. Its clients are largely vocational and occupational training programs; they teach a variety of trades and skills from cosmetology to nursing to criminal justice, among many others, with degree programs of up to four years.
SPORTS
August 17, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
If he were a younger, more sentimental man, Vin Scully probably would have accompanied the Dodgers to Philadelphia for the Citizens Bank Park series that begins Tuesday. But the sport's most eloquent, mellifluous and beloved broadcaster is 88 now and happy for any respite from the spotlit hoopla that has accompanied his 67th and last season. A final visit here would have brought Scully full circle, back to the city where, in the third inning of a Dodgers-Phillies game at Shibe Park on April 18, 1950, his long and distinguished career officially began.
SPORTS
August 5, 2016 | By Paul Domowitch, STAFF WRITER
EVERY PLAYER in the National Football League aspires to win a Super Bowl. But few of them also aspire to win Best in Show at Westminster. OK, only one. Before he became a football star at Detroit Catholic Central High School and the University of Michigan, Eagles defensive tackle Mike Martin was a pretty big deal in the dog-show world. When he was a freshman in high school, he was named the No. 1 junior handler in the working-dog group by the American Kennel Club. The working-dog group includes larger breeds such as St. Bernards, Bernese mountain dogs, boxers, Great Danes, bull mastiffs, Siberian huskies and Rottweilers.
SPORTS
August 2, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
SPRINGFIELD, N.J. - Jimmy Walker didn't expect winning his first career major championship to be easy, but even he had to be surprised how many great shots he had to strike at rain-soaked Baltusrol Golf Club before finally joining the pantheon of Grand Slam champions. The unassuming 37-year-old from Texas appeared to have the PGA Championship securely in hand Sunday after a birdie at the 17th hole gave him a 3-stroke lead over defending champion Jason Day. But Day's eagle at the par-5 18th meant that Walker needed a par to collect the Wanamaker Trophy.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: My partner, "Andrew," and I have been together for four years. I'm a high school teacher, and he works for a major department store. Andrew has always wanted to be a flight attendant and now has the opportunity to interview for a position with a regional carrier. If he gets the job, he will have to relocate to the mid-Atlantic. I want him to follow his dreams and be successful, and I want to support him, but right now I'm not in a position financially to leave my job and go with him. Although I'm a good teacher, there is additional education I need to pursue, and I have worked with my department chair on a five-year plan that includes some study abroad.
SPORTS
July 26, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. - It was a made-for-Hollywood story that reached its peak in the Big Apple after the briefest of stops in Miami. The final emotional act played out Sunday in the place where some of baseball's greatest players have been coming for years to take the ultimate bow. Tears started flowing as soon as catcher Mike Piazza stepped to the podium to begin his 28-minute Hall of Fame induction speech in the searing heat Sunday afternoon....
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Danielle Arnold-Schwartz, a teacher in the Lower Merion School District, considers education her calling. Yet, when her 16-year-old daughter began mulling the same career path, she advised her to choose a second major, just in case. The profession, Arnold-Schwartz warned, has been undermined by skin-and-bones school budgets, testing overkill, increasingly rigorous teacher evaluations, and dimming public respect, among a raft of relatively recent negatives. "I don't think you'll find this as satisfying as you think," she told her daughter.
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