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NEWS
November 16, 2001 | By Judy Harch
November is Alzheimer's Awareness Month. Unless Alzheimer's disease touches our lives personally, most of us have very little knowledge of the tremendous impact it has on caregivers and their families. For the last two years, I have been cowriting a book for Alzheimer's caregivers with my friend Jim Knittweis of Philadelphia. Jim was a primary caregiver for his father as they shared the difficult journey known as the "long good-bye. " Recently, Jim and I attended the South Jersey chapter of the Alzheimer's Association's annual caregiver conference at Salem Community College.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Carol Bertino likens the elderly to oysters. Within the shell of the oyster is a beautiful pearl, created from a grain of sand that irritates the inside of the mollusk. Of the elderly, she said, "On the outside we often just see wrinkles. " But what people don't see, she said, is what happens inside, just like what happens in oysters. "So it is with many older people. They've had many difficult experiences. " Bertino is administrator of Promise Alternative Care Inc., a nonprofit, Cherry Hill-based medical day-care center primarily for the elderly.
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Sheila-Rea York warmly welcomed a visitor to the immaculate cottage in Mount Airy, then provided blue hospital-style shoe covers and antibacterial soap for hand washing. She led the way to the bedroom and proudly introduced the focus of her life - her mother, Dorothy York, 86. The octogenarian was propped up in a hospital bed, wearing a floral lilac nightgown. She can't walk and is disabled by many infirmities, including dementia. "I'm real old," she said when asked her age. "They used to change people's age way back to get jobs and all, and I'm older than they say. " Aside, Rea York murmured, "My mother says she's 129 years old. " Rea York fits the National Alliance for Caregiving's profile of a "higher-hour" caregiver: a fiftysomething woman who spends an average of 62 hours a week bathing, dressing, nursing, running errands, communicating with doctors, and managing the finances of an adult family member.
NEWS
June 18, 2014
SHE JUST wouldn't move. My sisters and I had a meeting with our mother to talk about her living situation. It was hard to care for her when she lived in another state. After two strokes, she had trouble walking. She needed help with meal preparation and bathing. She got some assistance from friends, but it was a struggle. We were so relieved when our mother, 74, agreed to move in with my older sister, who had purchased a split-level home partly to accommodate the possibility of our mother living there.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | By Shaun Stanert, Special to The Inquirer
When people must tackle the often overwhelming responsibility of caring for an aging disabled spouse or relative, they often forget to take care of themselves. Too often the chores "can consume the caregiver's emotional as well as financial resources," said social worker Claudia Whittaker, who is organizing a support group for caregivers in Bucks County in January. The group is designed to help people like a 66-year-old man from Warrington - the husband of a blind woman recently disabled by an aortic aneurism.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
'So you fell and you couldn't get up?" I asked. It took my 83-year-old mother a second to get my reference to the alarm company's infamous TV commercial, but, luckily, she often shares my dark sense of humor. She was in her yard feeding birds when her four-footed cane tipped on uneven ground and she toppled over. She's grown more frail of late and couldn't stand back up. My brother, who lives near her, insists that she carry a cellphone. She summoned him. That's when her story took a surprising turn.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Compassionate and loving Samuel, 13, is very affectionate and helpful with his caregivers. He likes reading books with them and then discussing the stories. Sam also enjoys doing puzzles, playing video games and watching movies. He shows his creative side through the cars he builds with Legos. Although Sam frequently participates with his peers in games, he happily plays independently. Sam has been diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome. In school he benefits from special education services and individual attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: My mother's Alzheimer's became apparent after she was in a car accident. I should have noticed the signs earlier, but I didn't. Her body recovered, her mind did not. I built a new house with a separate suite for her. My wife and I tried to care for her for a year, but I'm disabled and Mom was afraid of my wife. There was never a moment's peace. Fearing for our collective health, I finally placed Mom into an assisted living facility. It was one of the hardest decisions of my life.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Vikki Ortiz Healy, Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO - Doug Wyman got up early Tuesday to make breakfast for his wife, Barbara: coffee, oatmeal and fresh fruit. He drew a bath and helped her get dressed, then sat with her through her favorite morning TV shows. Not because it was Valentine's Day. Because of love. After 63 years of marriage, the couple developed their routine when Alzheimer's disease left Barbara unable to do things herself. But it's a routine that Doug Wyman - like a growing number of men who have assumed the role of caregiver in recent years - embraces proudly.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Bill Manzi took a deep breath, and yet another. Breathe-in-the-nose, breathe-out-the-mouth deep breaths. Then he answered his wife Susan's question, the same one she had just asked but had forgotten due to dementia. Susan Strohmetz is in the early stages of the disease. After she was diagnosed last year, Manzi almost immediately enrolled in a six-week-long caregiver class at the Penn Memory Center, where she is being treated ( www.philly.com/memory ). Strohmetz, now 70 and retired, was diagnosed in 2014 with mild cognitive impairment.
NEWS
March 24, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
The worst six months of Candice Archibald's life began last summer while she was playing Frisbee at Old Swedes' Church with her red nose pit bull Otto. Her baby. That's what Candice calls her pets: her kids. Like so many of us, that's how she loves and treats them - like they're her kids. And that's how she loves and treats the animals she takes care of for her dog-walking business. Like they're her kids, too. That's how she treats Sadie, my crazy little Australian cattle dog. My wife and I would do anything for Sadie.
NEWS
January 31, 2016
ISSUE | BLIZZARD OF 2016 The neighborhood the plows forgot Mayor Kenney has been praised for the storm cleanup, but not by residents of East Germantown, where most of the streets as of Thursday had yet to see a plow pass through - not even on the bus routes ("Storming into good graces," Thursday). I have owned House at Pooh Corner Day Care in East Germantown for more than 35 years, and this is the first time I have seen the bus routes go unplowed. My teachers had to walk long distances to work because the Route XH bus was suspended for days.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Expect to say "I'm sorry" a lot if you decide to try one of the trendier ways to communicate with people who have Alzheimer's. There was a time when caregivers tried orienting people with dementia to reality. That often feels like the natural thing to do. "No, Mom, I actually did tell you that. Like, five times. " But at Daylesford Crossing, an assisted-living facility in Paoli, workers are more likely to just go with it if a resident has some strange ideas. Let's say Mom or Grandma is furiously accusing her neighbor of stealing something.
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Sheila-Rea York warmly welcomed a visitor to the immaculate cottage in Mount Airy, then provided blue hospital-style shoe covers and antibacterial soap for hand washing. She led the way to the bedroom and proudly introduced the focus of her life - her mother, Dorothy York, 86. The octogenarian was propped up in a hospital bed, wearing a floral lilac nightgown. She can't walk and is disabled by many infirmities, including dementia. "I'm real old," she said when asked her age. "They used to change people's age way back to get jobs and all, and I'm older than they say. " Aside, Rea York murmured, "My mother says she's 129 years old. " Rea York fits the National Alliance for Caregiving's profile of a "higher-hour" caregiver: a fiftysomething woman who spends an average of 62 hours a week bathing, dressing, nursing, running errands, communicating with doctors, and managing the finances of an adult family member.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Dementia can ruin a social life. Friends don't know how to act around someone whose brain is failing, and people with dementia often withdraw as social situations get more confusing. As a result, people with Alzheimer's or another memory-robbing dementia - and their caregivers - can become isolated. Knowing that, Genevieve Ilg, a social-work graduate student who is interning at the Penn Memory Center, was intrigued when she read about "memory cafés," a European innovation that is slowly taking hold in the United States.
NEWS
October 16, 2015
ALTHOUGH THE shelves in my home office are packed with books by financial experts offering really good advice, it was my grandmother Big Mama who taught me most of what I know about handling money. And she did it while living below the poverty line. To this day, I marvel at how Big Mama raised five grandchildren on her tiny salary. Pride and frustration with the welfare system made her refuse monetary assistance from the state. At times we may not have had enough for seconds during meals, but we never went hungry.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Corporate mergers often mean layoffs, as new bosses redefine standards. But when Valley View at Elwyn, an assisted-living home for deaf residents, joined the Mercy Health System, something very different happened. Valley View's 13 direct-care providers are deaf and use American Sign Language with their patients, some of whom have lived there for 30 years. But Mercy LIFE (Living Independently for Elders) requires staff to be registered nurse aides, and Valley View's staff lacked that qualification.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
RUBY HORNE Hill had that special glow about her that nobody could really explain. But she had the ability to light up a room just by stepping into it. Yes, she was a beauty, but more important, according to her family, she had a beautiful spirit. "When Ruby walked into a room, the room lit up like bright sunshine," her family said. Ruby Horne Hill, a talented artist and designer and a dedicated family matriarch, died June 9. She was 90 and lived in West Philadelphia. Ruby had many gifts.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A POLICE OFFICER testified yesterday that when he checked on an elderly woman in an East Frankford home in November, he thought she was dead. Officer Mike Laverghetta said that when he went into the home on Haworth Street near Worth about 11 a.m. Nov. 7, he saw Prane Paciunas, 89, lying on a mattress on the living-room floor. Paciunas had a large comforter pulled up to her neck and bugs all around her, the officer said at a preliminary hearing for Jean Dombrowski, 48, who was Paciunas' caregiver and who had power of attorney over her affairs.
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