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Cargo Containers

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BUSINESS
October 29, 1998 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael Ehrlich says he's been "pulling [his] hair out," trying to get his houseware products from Asia to the United States in time for the Christmas shopping season. Ehrlich is vice president of Creative Home Decors, a Philadelphia importer of Asian general merchandise and houseware goods. But because of a shortage of empty cargo containers in Asia, U.S. importers such as Creative Home Decors are having difficulty getting products out of the Far East. Even when containers are available, there is not enough space on the ships leaving Asian ports.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Laura Copeland, SANTA CRUZ SENTINEL
ZAYANTE, Calif. - Suspended from a crane in the Santa Cruz Mountains, Connie DeWitt's kitchen and bathroom are inches from nudging a madrone tree. The 30-foot shipping container was the largest of six trucked from Oakland, Calif., up a muddy road one Thursday afternoon. Before dinner, less than eight hours after the containers arrived, workers from NorCal Construction in Santa Cruz had ground the final bits of rust off the boxes and welded them together to create DeWitt's two-story mountain retreat.
NEWS
October 7, 1996 | GEORGE REYNOLDS/ DAILY NEWS
Striking International Longshoremen's Association members picket Holt Cargo Systems at the Packer Marine Terminal in South Philadelphia yesterday. At issue is whether ILA members or workers from the International Association of Machinists will repair and maintain cargo containers for Holt. Managers have been unloading ships since the walkout began.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A Philadelphia firm allegedly paid more than $600,000 in kickbacks to sell steel to a company building cargo containers for the Navy, prosecutors charged yesterday in a civil suit filed in federal court here. Alleging that the Navy was overcharged to make up for the kickbacks, prosecutors are seeking more than $1.8 million in damages from the firm, DeReve & Co., 1518 Walnut St., and its owner, William Goldstein. Prosecutors alleged that Goldstein paid the kickbacks to two officers of a Lancaster firm, United Chem Con Corp.
NEWS
April 1, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein and Peter Boylan INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Terrorists and weapons of mass destruction could reach U.S. ports concealed among millions of uninspected cargo containers, U.S. maritime security officials fear, but measures to stop them aren't likely to be in place before 2008 under current plans. So U.S. officials are pressing the rest of the world to move faster to install a system of electronic devices on boats that allows global tracking of incoming ships. Even then, the system wouldn't be in place before mid-2004. In addition to surveillance of ships, U.S. officials want penetrating checks into the backgrounds of foreign crew members and - most important - a better idea of what's inside the seaborne cargo containers that deliver nearly a half-trillion dollars' worth of U.S. imports annually.
NEWS
December 15, 1999 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Attention, Kmart shoppers. Thieves hit your store early yesterday morning. Again. For the second time in as many days, bandits targeted the Kmart on Orthodox Street near Castor Avenue in the Northeast. But their efforts were not so fruitful as those of the previous day's robbers. These thieves, described by police as two white males, made off with several boxes of bottled water. The two gunmen who struck in the wee hours Monday morning, described by police as two black males wearing gauze masks, got somewhere between $40,000 and $140,000 in cash.
NEWS
November 17, 1990 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A consultant for a now-defunct Lancaster military contractor pleaded guilty yesterday in U.S. District Court to charges that he provided gratuities to a member of Congress and a congressional aide and that he understated his income in an effort to avoid paying taxes. Federal prosecutors said the consultant, Raymond S. Wittig, 45, of Rockville, Md., was expected to cooperate in an ongoing criminal investigation of a congressman and a congressional aide who allegedly accepted use of a Delaware beach house in return for helping United Chem-Con, the Lancaster firm, obtain federal contracts.
NEWS
December 21, 1988 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The crewmen of the foundering Greek freighter Stark tried in vain to pump water from their leaking vessel before abandoning ship 300 miles south of Bermuda, a man who identified himself as the Stark's captain said yesterday. The ship started leaking on its port side, said the captain, who spoke in a brief, shouted conversation from the railing of the German ship Sea Merchant, which was docked at the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal in South Philadelphia. "We started pumping the water outside," said the captain, who did not give his name before returning to a meeting aboard the ship with U.S. customs and immigration officials.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
As New Jersey communities go, Cinnaminson was hardly one of Hurricane Sandy's hardest hit. But for a small business based there, the monumental storm just might prove to be the validation it needs. Not for its typical work, but for something it has been trying to promote for a few years. Sea Box Inc. has been an expert for nearly 30 years in customizing shipping containers, turning vessels ordinarily used for moving products from one point to another into works of creative functionality.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1992 | By David Johnston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Heavy-machinery manufacturers urged a legislative committee yesterday to move quickly to enlarge railroad-tunnel and bridge openings across the state to save industrial jobs. A series of speakers warned the House Business and Commerce committee that Pennsylvania was very late in joining the "double-stack revolution. " That is the rapid shift to shipping cargo in containers that can be transferred from truck to ship to rail car, where the containers can be stacked two high to cut shipping costs.
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BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
As New Jersey communities go, Cinnaminson was hardly one of Hurricane Sandy's hardest hit. But for a small business based there, the monumental storm just might prove to be the validation it needs. Not for its typical work, but for something it has been trying to promote for a few years. Sea Box Inc. has been an expert for nearly 30 years in customizing shipping containers, turning vessels ordinarily used for moving products from one point to another into works of creative functionality.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Jim Brennan is a rarity for a small-business owner: He has an executive-style corner office. But before you get too envious, consider that it is partly made from a shipping container. Then again, be envious. From his rather unusual perch in Burlington County, Brennan has been presiding over a business whose growth has been staggering, especially for these woeful economic times - and for a U.S.-based manufacturer. For 28 years, Brennan's Sea Box Inc., in Cinnaminson, has been demonstrating with astonishing creativity the many uses for shipping containers - including a giant movie screen when stacked 10 high, living quarters for circus elephants, mobile repair stations for military vehicles in war zones, and the latest adaptation, temporary emergency housing.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Laura Copeland, SANTA CRUZ SENTINEL
ZAYANTE, Calif. - Suspended from a crane in the Santa Cruz Mountains, Connie DeWitt's kitchen and bathroom are inches from nudging a madrone tree. The 30-foot shipping container was the largest of six trucked from Oakland, Calif., up a muddy road one Thursday afternoon. Before dinner, less than eight hours after the containers arrived, workers from NorCal Construction in Santa Cruz had ground the final bits of rust off the boxes and welded them together to create DeWitt's two-story mountain retreat.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2007 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moving the Regional Produce Market to the Navy Yard would create serious security risks and block major growth at the Port of Philadelphia, maritime business and labor leaders said yesterday. Uwe Schulz, president of the Ports of the Delaware River Marine Trade Association, pressed port officials to fight a plan by Gov. Rendell and State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo (D., Phila.) to put the new produce terminal on the Navy Yard site, just south of the port. The association is the employer group that hires labor for the port.
NEWS
April 1, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein and Peter Boylan INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Terrorists and weapons of mass destruction could reach U.S. ports concealed among millions of uninspected cargo containers, U.S. maritime security officials fear, but measures to stop them aren't likely to be in place before 2008 under current plans. So U.S. officials are pressing the rest of the world to move faster to install a system of electronic devices on boats that allows global tracking of incoming ships. Even then, the system wouldn't be in place before mid-2004. In addition to surveillance of ships, U.S. officials want penetrating checks into the backgrounds of foreign crew members and - most important - a better idea of what's inside the seaborne cargo containers that deliver nearly a half-trillion dollars' worth of U.S. imports annually.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2000 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
FastShip Inc., the Philadelphia firm that hopes to launch high-speed ocean cargo service between here and Europe, has agreed to acquire a portion of the long-dormant Conrail Port Richmond Terminal. The yard was built by the old Reading Railroad on the eve of World War I as its gateway to the Atlantic Ocean for cargo ranging from coal and iron ore to sugar. If the plans - expected to be announced today - come to fruition, Port Richmond would become the ultramodern home port and maintenance base for a new generation of ocean cargo ships.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First they came crammed into rusty fishing boats, filthy, overcrowded and dangerous. Now would-be Chinese immigrants are paying tens of thousands of dollars to be smuggled into the United States in 40-foot-long cargo containers, stacked between hundreds of others on huge cargo ships. In the last two weeks, authorities on the West Coast have arrested 75 Chinese immigrants who had arrived on ships docking at Los Angeles, Long Beach, Calif., and Seattle. On Monday, 25 people also were arrested leaving a ship in Vancouver, British Columbia.
NEWS
December 15, 1999 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Attention, Kmart shoppers. Thieves hit your store early yesterday morning. Again. For the second time in as many days, bandits targeted the Kmart on Orthodox Street near Castor Avenue in the Northeast. But their efforts were not so fruitful as those of the previous day's robbers. These thieves, described by police as two white males, made off with several boxes of bottled water. The two gunmen who struck in the wee hours Monday morning, described by police as two black males wearing gauze masks, got somewhere between $40,000 and $140,000 in cash.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1998 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael Ehrlich says he's been "pulling [his] hair out," trying to get his houseware products from Asia to the United States in time for the Christmas shopping season. Ehrlich is vice president of Creative Home Decors, a Philadelphia importer of Asian general merchandise and houseware goods. But because of a shortage of empty cargo containers in Asia, U.S. importers such as Creative Home Decors are having difficulty getting products out of the Far East. Even when containers are available, there is not enough space on the ships leaving Asian ports.
NEWS
April 4, 1997 | Daily News wire services
PORT ORANGE, Fla. Disabled man wants to lease his kidneys "Kidneys?" reads the newspaper ad. "I have 2 excellent ones! Long-term lease available. " Bob Loturco, 60, disabled and barely surviving on a $550 a month Social Security pension, wants to ease his retirement years by leasing one of his kidneys for 99 years to someone in need. Price negotiable. "It's my darn kidney," the former boat builder and car salesman said Wednesday. He has emphysema and cannot work but he is not dying and believes one kidney will do just fine.
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