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Cargo Ship

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NEWS
March 5, 1999 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coast Guard helicopters delivered three water pumps to assist a 372-foot Panamanian cargo ship that called for help yesterday after it began taking on water in 15-foot seas, 30-knot winds and snow squalls about 26 miles east of Barnegat Light. The ship, the Star of Puerto Rico, was carrying automobiles from New York to the Dominican Republic and had 18 people aboard, officials said. Forced to turn around, it was able to continue back toward New York at 6 knots as pumping began.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2016
The U.S. Coast Guard has proposed a $65,000 civil fine against a cargo ship that delivered fresh fruit to the Port of Wilmington earlier this month. The Nassau, Bahamas-flagged Discovery Bay reefer was cited for "nonfunctioning" oil pollution prevention equipment, and other infractions, during a routine inspection by the Coast Guard on Jan. 4. The captain and 20 crew are being detained while the ship gets new equipment, and the crew is retrained, said Coast Guard Cmdr. Dennis Miller, chief of prevention for the Delaware River and Bay. The fruit came from Valparaiso, Chile.
NEWS
July 25, 1988 | By RAMONA SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
And then there was one. The Khian Sea once again is the only ship at sea with unwanted incinerator ash from Philadelphia, now that a second floating ash pile has returned home. The massive cargo ship Banya rests today in the shadow of the Girard Point Bridge. The Khian Sea has vanished. The Banya arrived Friday at Pier 2 on the Schuylkill with 15,000 tons of char-broiled ash that had crossed the Atlantic twice and sparked an international incident in Guinea. The 535-foot Banya moved up the Delaware River without protest or fanfare, in contrast to the uproar that surrounded the attempted March return of the Khian Sea. The hapless Khian Sea, which has now wandered for nearly 23 months in search of a dump, got no closer to Philadelphia than an anchorage in Delaware Bay. The rusty-hulled vessel, rejected by five nations, retreated to the ocean in May after its agents were unable to work out an unloading deal.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1994 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
One ship proposal has encountered smooth sailing, but another has run into some turbulent water with the Delaware River Port Authority. DRPA is expected today to sign a deal that will give FastShip Atlantic Inc. $7 million to complete its design of a high-tech cargo ship that it says will cut trans-Atlantic travel time in half. "This is the beginning of a whole new era for the port, and it will be just an immense success," said Peter Hearn, FastShip's local general counsel.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | By Dan Gilmore, Special to The Inquirer
The beautiful lady is really a tramp - an elegant tramp steamer. There is nothing like it on the seven seas. It is the 19,500-ton Americana. Three-quarters of its 578-foot length is an honest, hard-working container cargo ship that plies trade routes to South American ports. It delivers and picks up cargo during its 48-day round trips from New York to ports in Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay. Its stern quarter is a magnificent white five-deck liner with luxury accommodations challenging those of the Queen Elizabeth 2. The designer-crafted, temperature-controlled cabins and suites can accommodate 108 passengers.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The Pfc. Eugene A. Obregon is the latest military ship to arrive at Dry Dock No. 3 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard for a routine inspection and repairs. The 50,000-ton Obregon is longer than two football fields and vast enough for military vehicles to drive on and off. It's part of the U.S. military fleet that quickly transports tanks, trucks, humvees, and helicopters - and even ammunition - to troops around the world. Northeast Ship Repair, owner of Philadelphia Ship Repair and a second dock in Boston, won the bid to do the work.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cargo ship that has been stuck in the Delaware River since April because of needed repairs and owners who could not pay for them is poised to set sail next week. The former Nikol H has a new name, Nicolina, as well as a new crew and new owners. A federal lawsuit that had kept the vessel here has been settled. To celebrate, the Seamen's Church Institute, which regularly greets seafarers in ports along the Delaware, provided lunch and a festive farewell Wednesday for the 20 new Filipino crew members.
NEWS
September 4, 2003 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eight Turkish sailors remain stranded on a cargo ship detained along a bank of the Delaware River in early June, victims of a legal tug-of-war between the ship's owner and a German bank. Twenty-one crew members were originally aboard the Istanbul-based Ahmetbey, which was unloading cargo in Bucks County when a federal judge in Philadelphia ordered it "arrested. " Thirteen have been allowed to go home in the last month, but only after more than two months of confinement on the docked ship, questions of port safety and immigration stalling their return to Turkey.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer United Press International also contributed to this article
A dramatic rescue effort was under way early today after a Coast Guard search plane spotted people waving flashlights from a life raft in stormy seas 200 miles off the New Jersey coast, near the site where a 250-foot cargo ship had capsized. As of 2 a.m., one crew member had been rescued and taken on board the merchant ship Eagle, which was assisting the Coast Guard in the rescue effort. The life raft was spotted about 12:15 a.m., five hours after the Lloyd's Bermuda captain radioed a distress signal, saying that the ship was sinking and that the 11 members of the crew were piling into two life rafts.
NEWS
July 18, 2004 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With speakers touting the importance of American commercial shipyards to the nation's economy and security, the six-year-old Kvaerner Philadelphia Shipyard christened its second ship yesterday. The Maunawili, which means "winding mountain" in Hawaiian, was built for the 122-year-old Matson Navigation Co., a subsidiary of Alexander & Baldwin Inc., of Honolulu. During its expected 30 years in service, the 712-foot cargo ship will travel three million miles "and provide a vital lifeline to Hawaii, which are the most isolated populated islands in the world," said James S. Andrasick, president of Matson.
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BUSINESS
February 9, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
When the SeaLand Atlantico cargo ship arrived at the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal in South Philadelphia before dawn Thursday, it was the first time that fresh produce, meat, beer, and electronics traveled directly from the Gulf of Mexico to Philadelphia on an ocean route. Until now, the historic mode for getting limes, avocados, tomatoes, onions, and peppers from the Mexican ports of Veracruz and Altamira to the East Coast has been by truck - through long lines at border crossings and across congested highways.
NEWS
February 3, 2016
FRANCE Cargo ship is towed away from shore Rescuers successfully diverted a cargo ship threatening to run aground in southwestern France after five days adrift, and started towing it Tuesday toward the Spanish port of Bilbao. Broadcast images showed the 538-foot Modern Express listing dramatically as it was towed by another ship via a cable on Monday afternoon. The maritime authority for France's Atlantic Coast said in a statement later that the operation was successful and the ship was towed far enough from the coast to avoid running aground.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2016
The U.S. Coast Guard has proposed a $65,000 civil fine against a cargo ship that delivered fresh fruit to the Port of Wilmington earlier this month. The Nassau, Bahamas-flagged Discovery Bay reefer was cited for "nonfunctioning" oil pollution prevention equipment, and other infractions, during a routine inspection by the Coast Guard on Jan. 4. The captain and 20 crew are being detained while the ship gets new equipment, and the crew is retrained, said Coast Guard Cmdr. Dennis Miller, chief of prevention for the Delaware River and Bay. The fruit came from Valparaiso, Chile.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The Pfc. Eugene A. Obregon is the latest military ship to arrive at Dry Dock No. 3 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard for a routine inspection and repairs. The 50,000-ton Obregon is longer than two football fields and vast enough for military vehicles to drive on and off. It's part of the U.S. military fleet that quickly transports tanks, trucks, humvees, and helicopters - and even ammunition - to troops around the world. Northeast Ship Repair, owner of Philadelphia Ship Repair and a second dock in Boston, won the bid to do the work.
TRAVEL
October 19, 2015 | By Frank King, For The Inquirer
Periodically, I receive from my university alumni office brochures advertising exotic trips to far-off destinations. I usually browse through them and then throw them in the trash. But then I saw one advertising a cruise celebrating the centennial anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal. Rather than a massive cruise ship, the trip was on a luxury yacht-size vessel with only 36 staterooms accommodating 72 passengers. I knew that trip was worth experiencing, so I promptly called the travel agent, who informed me only one stateroom was available.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cargo ship that has been stuck in the Delaware River since April because of needed repairs and owners who could not pay for them is poised to set sail next week. The former Nikol H has a new name, Nicolina, as well as a new crew and new owners. A federal lawsuit that had kept the vessel here has been settled. To celebrate, the Seamen's Church Institute, which regularly greets seafarers in ports along the Delaware, provided lunch and a festive farewell Wednesday for the 20 new Filipino crew members.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Greek-owned cargo ship has been anchored in the Delaware River for nearly 16 weeks, with 20 crew on board, caught in a quagmire between U.S. Coast Guard demands for operational repairs, and an owner who has not paid bills incurred since April. The Nikol H, which is registered in the Marshall Islands, needs additional repairs before sailing, and the owners allegedly owe as much as $1.2 million, which prompted vendors and others to sue to recover costs for providing fuel, food, and supplies while the ship has been here.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Seamen's Church Institute has been a fixture on the Philadelphia waterfront for nearly 170 years, providing friendly help each year to 40,000 seafarers whose ships dock in ports along the Delaware. Soon, the interdenominational ministry will have a new head chaplain and executive director: the Rev. Peter B. Stube, 61, an Episcopal priest who served 13 years as rector of the Church of the Redeemer in Springfield, Delaware County. For the last decade, he has been rector of Christ Church of New Bern, N.C., the second-largest parish in the Diocese of East Carolina.
NEWS
November 1, 2012
Two cargo ships originally bound for the Port of New York and New Jersey will unload instead at Packer Avenue Marine Terminal in South Philadelphia because of lingering power outages, flooding, and potential damage to the New York harbor caused by Hurricane Sandy. The vessels will unload here temporarily. One shipper currently serves the Philadelphia port in addition to New York, said Tom Holt Jr., who runs the terminal at Packer Avenue and Columbus Boulevard. Agencies, including the U.S. Coast Guard and Army Corps of Engineers, have been surveying channels in the New York harbor, looking for underwater obstructions and damage to terminals and berths caused by the storm.
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