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Caribbean

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BUSINESS
February 24, 1988 | By Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia-area businesses in need of foreign partners, suppliers or markets should look to the Caribbean rather than the Far East. That was the message yesterday as U.S. business executives and trade officials from several Caribbean nations addressed about 20 people during an all-day conference on Caribbean trade opportunities, conducted at the Rutgers University College Center in Camden. Several speakers said some U.S. businesspeople harbor misconceptions about the Caribbean that make them overlook opportunities there.
NEWS
July 27, 1987 | By Edward A. Padelford
On a summer day in 1982, American officials met with the chief minister of a small Caribbean nation. The meeting, requested by the chief minister of the Turks and Caicos Islands (population about 9,000) was a last-ditch plea by the minister to persuade the U.S. Air Force to keep its small base on Grand Turk Island, or as he phrased it that the "U.S. continue to fly the flag. " The minister's plea failed, but he was successful in persuading the respected Smithsonian Institution to establish an experimental crab-fishing project on the site of the air base.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1992 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steel-drum king Terrence Cameron, backed by his sextet, the Steel Kings, will provide the music. Traditional West Indian food, such as curried goat, "jerk" chicken and rice and beans will be on sale. The event will take place in IH's Hopkinson Hall, at 37th and Chestnut Streets. Admission is $10. The fun begins at 8 p.m. To reserve tickets, call the Folklife Center at 215-895-6537 or TicketMaster at 215-336-2000.
NEWS
December 3, 2006 | By David Swanson FOR THE INQUIRER
Headed to the Caribbean this year? Tens of thousands of people leaving from Philadelphia International Airport are. Here's the rundown on what's noteworthy and what's new. Anguilla is ideal for those seeking peace and quiet, easygoing islanders, fine restaurants, and spectacular white-sand beaches, all of which makes it a big hit with celebs who can afford the often-high price tag. Its undistinguished hills are splotched with scrub, outlined by...
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Once on This Island, a romantic musical fable in Caribbean style, has moved from Off-Broadway to full Broadway status with a becoming modesty. The show's folk-tale quality has been respected in the transition to the Booth Theater. The one setting, a riot of tropical vegetation and color, has the look of a primitive painting. The 11 performers form a vital ensemble as they give themselves over to the tale's West Indies rhythms and superstitions with childlike abandon. They play gods and men without prejudice to either.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: We're planning a trip to the Caribbean soon, and recently we heard a report warning against eating certain fish. Do you know of any specific species to avoid? U.D., Downingtown Answer: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has this to say about fish dangers: "Some fish are not guaranteed to be safe even when cooked because of the presence of toxins in their flesh. Tropical-reef fish, red snapper, amberjack, grouper and sea bass can occasionally be toxic at unpredictable times if they are caught on tropical reefs rather than open ocean.
NEWS
November 12, 1995 | By Judi Dash, FOR THE INQUIRER
There was no apple, no snake, but we still felt like a latter-day Adam and Eve as we splashed naked in our private plunge pool surrounded by a Garden of Eden with room service. We were spending a few days at Jalousie Plantation, a two-year-old resort and spa nestled in the lush cleavage between the twin peaks of St. Lucia's 2,000-foot-high Pitons. Most visitors briefly get to see these towering mountains - considered the Caribbean's most distinctive land formations - while flying into the country, cruising by, or bouncing past on the gutted roads to the beach resorts.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Hurricane Mitch cut through the western Caribbean yesterday, pummeling coastal Honduras and Belize with driving rain and fierce winds that snapped trees and sent thousands of people fleeing for higher ground. Ten storm-related deaths were reported. Honduran President Carlos Flores Facusse declared the highest state of alert and sent in troops to evacuate thousands of people from villages on the sparsely populated coast. Thousands more made their way to safer ground on their own. Most of the population of Belize City fled inland in cars and government buses, while tourists rushed to find ways out of the Mexican resorts of Cancun and Cozumel, where the storm is expected to hit by the end of the week.
NEWS
March 30, 1986 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who needs the Jersey shore? Here are two reasons to visit the Caribbean this summer, aside from the usual one, which is that prices are low, even though the weather, in many cases, is more breezy than broiling: On the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica, rain is the predominant summer weather pattern. Travelers with the New York Zoological Society's turtle- tagging project will have lots of opportunity to walk the beaches, in the rain, at night. That's when the green sea turtles come up on land.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | By Don Cunningham, Special to The Inquirer
With quiet grace, the small woman made her way through the maze of chairs to the center of the room, adjusted her headwrap and said a few words in a soft Jamaican accent. Then she began to read excerpts from a novel called Jane and Louisa Will Soon Come Home. The gracious woman, Erna Brodber, wrote it. It's not a book many American students will find on their required-reading lists, even though it earned Brodber acclaim as one of the Caribbean region's finest writers. Concern about that kind of omission was what brought about two dozen educators to Abington Friends School in Jenkintown last week to hear Brodber speak at a conference titled "Tradition and Identity in the West Indies.
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NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Julia M. Klein, For The Inquirer
We're clearly not in Kansas anymore. In Jamaica , the songwriters of The Wizard of Oz have transported us to a rural fishing community where the humor is broad, the costumes colorful, the rhythms calypso - and the inhabitants improbably rhyme Pagliacci and Liberace . The New Freedom Theatre's revival of the 1957 Broadway musical, an idiosyncratic theatrical artifact, is energetic, athletically danced, vocally uneven, and often unabashedly...
TRAVEL
May 2, 2016 | By Nancy M. Alterman, For The Inquirer
It didn't take long to persuade my 23-year-old daughter and her boyfriend to join me on a 14-day Carnival Cruise to the southern Caribbean. Both were reluctant to use all their vacation time for one celebration - my 60th birthday. But with some adjusting, we found a way to make it work. Leaving from Baltimore, we wouldn't need to deal with the hassles of flying or arrive exhausted to get started on a trip of a lifetime. And that it was. From the moment we left, we were silly with joy at our good fortune.
NEWS
October 11, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ADENAH BAYOH has a mind for business. As the first black woman in New Jersey to open an IHOP franchise, she now owns three restaurants in the flapjack chain. She co-founded a real estate firm that's building a $150 million residential and retail development in the Garden State. And she was identified as one of the Top 50 women in business by NJBIZ, a weekly journal. But the 37-year-old North Jersey entrepreneur's pursuits aren't limited to the business world. She is also encouraging young women to pursue their dreams by establishing a scholarship.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
PICTURE A grizzly, swashbuckling pirate who sails the high seas in search of ships to plunder. Now, add a yarmulke. Actually, Jewish pirates who ransacked Spanish ships in Caribbean waters during Colonial times wore more intimidating Cavalier-style hats. But make no mistake: There were Jewish pirates of the Caribbean. "They were pirates through and through," said Sahar Oz, director of programming for the Gershman Y, which hosts a talk about the Sephardic seafarers Thursday, in conjunction with a photo exhibit on Caribbean synagogues.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
This is the time of year when many of us dream of flying south to hang out on a warm beach. Increasingly, though, travelers are coming home with more than a deeper tan and a better mood. Some soon have the high fever and intense joint pain of a virus that's taken our southern neighbors by storm in the last year and has already found a home in Florida. Chikungunya, which can cause weeks of arthritis-like joint pain, has been migrating around the world from East Africa since the late 1950s.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jumping on the interest generated by President Obama's new policy on Cuba, the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania said Tuesday that it would conduct a conference April 1 in New York City for companies and executives interested in doing business in the Caribbean nation. "This is going to be a really big change for the entire region, and a historic change for relations between the United States and Cuba," said Mukul Pandya, editor-in-chief of Knowledge@Wharton , who will host the Cuba Opportunity Summit.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dulce de leche is not currently a flavor offered by Philadelphia-based Bassetts Ice Cream Co. "Closest to that is our classic butterscotch vanilla, which has . . . those caramel notes that a dulce de leche does," Bassetts president Michael Strange said Wednesday when asked whether and how his company would serve Cuba if a U.S. plan to reestablish diplomatic ties and expand economic trade after nearly 53 years succeeds. "If we find the right retail partners there . . . and they give us direction on flavor . . . I would certainly look into developing those flavors," Strange said.
SPORTS
July 24, 2014 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
ANYBODY WHO met Dan Borislow understood almost instantly they were dealing with a larger-than-life figure - in business, at the racetrack, as a gambler, in life, savoring anything and everything he did. The Plymouth Whitemarsh and Widener University grad made millions in the telecom business, first with Tel-Save, a long-distance telephone-service provider and, more recently, with "magicJack," the device that enables people to make long-distance calls...
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cecile Kaplan Dalton, 77, of Radnor, a retired chemistry teacher at Philadelphia-area colleges, died Wednesday, Jan. 8, in her sleep after surgery for breast cancer in Houston. For many years, Dr. Dalton taught organic chemistry at Swarthmore College, Bryn Mawr College, and Temple University. She had a passion for teaching the serious, focused postbaccalaureate students who returned to college to complete the requirements for medical school. "She enjoyed helping them pursue their dream of becoming a doctor," said her son Aaron.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marcena Moore, 91, of Philadelphia, whose zest for music and astronomy was equaled only by her love of travel, died Sunday, Dec. 1, of respiratory failure at her home. Mrs. Moore was the controller of the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia from 1970 to 1996. Under the council's aegis, she led several trips, which kindled her passion for travel, her family said. Mrs. Moore's travels included visits to all seven continents, including a voyage aboard a Russian icebreaker to the Antarctic.
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