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Carillon

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NEWS
December 7, 2000 | By Elisa Ung, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The country's second-oldest carillon will soon ring again over Rittenhouse Square, perhaps as early as Christmas Eve. Its 25 bells, first hung atop the Church of the Holy Trinity in 1882, were donated by a Philadelphia dry-goods merchant in memory of his wife. Corrosion silenced them eight years ago, but a parishioner's hefty check started a restoration that began in February. Once rusty and dirty, the copper bells now gleam golden, and they can be played manually or electronically.
NEWS
April 30, 2001 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the Church of the Holy Trinity, across from the northwest corner of Rittenhouse Square, the bell tower sang out yesterday, on a magnificent spring afternoon. In its first full-throated concert in more than a decade, the 25-bell carillon rang out to a square thick with hundreds strolling and sunning. And after a 4 p.m. ceremony celebrated the occasion, congregants at the Episcopal church joined the public on the square to hear the bells in glorious harmonies. "The bells are God's witnesses that God is . . . never out of season," the Rev. Terence C. Roper, rector of Holy Trinity, told more than 100 folks gathered inside the church.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | By Elisa Ung, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1882, the 25 bells were hung in the 12-story tower of the Church of the Holy Trinity on Rittenhouse Square, the gift of a Philadelphia dry-goods merchant in memory of his wife. The second-oldest carillon in the United States - and the oldest manually operated one - rang regularly into the 1900s. But the bells eventually became corroded and fell out of use, and have been silent since a 1992 July Fourth celebration. Money for a major restoration always came up short. But last fall, a longtime church member offered a six-figure donation, and yesterday, workers began slowly lowering the bells from the tower using chains and ropes, starting a three-month renovation that will allow the carillon to be played manually and electronically.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Grace Toohey, Staff Writer
Sweat drips from her forehead. She strikes her fists on the large keys, her precision evident in the smooth and clear music that sprawls for acres across Valley Forge National Historical Park. The steamy air of a summer night seems to saturate the 100-foot Washington Memorial Chapel steeple that houses the bell tower, where Ulla Laage orchestrates the 58-bell carillon with conviction. "These bells have a special tone to them," said Laage, a visiting carillonneur from Haslev, Demark, who kicked off the chapel's free summer concert series Wednesday night.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | For The Inquirer / SCOTT S. HAMRICK
The Elsie S. Wright carillon and clock, built at a cost of $486,000 at the bequest of Wright and in memory of her and her husband, was dedicated Saturday in Folcroft. At the Delmar Drive site of the 40-foot high structure are (from left) Borough Manager Samuel J. Campagna, Folcroft Council President George Altman and Folcroft-Tinicum District Judge Anthony Michael Truscello.
NEWS
February 24, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
As Neil D. Theobald approaches his 60th birthday, he began looking for a way to honor his late parents. The Temple University president found the answer emanating from a church in Cincinnati. It came in the form of a 1,000-pound vintage bell. The university has installed the refurbished, 150-year-old bell in a cradle atop Shusterman Hall, a former church that Temple renovated in 1997 for conference space. The bell will be illuminated at night and chime on each quarter-hour for those across the North Philadelphia campus to hear.
NEWS
September 15, 2007
There were 40 heroes in the Sept. 11, 2001, crash of Flight 93 - not 39. The very notion that one passenger's name would be omitted from the nation's formal commemoration of the event is extremely disturbing. As for the prospect that the name would belong to one of the four likely leaders of the successful yet tragic effort to stop a hijacked plane from destroying a Washington landmark on 9/11, well, that's even worse. The hope, then, is that the father of one of those heroes will reconsider his vow to keep his son's name from the mountaintop memorial planned in Somerset County, Pa. As a passenger on Flight 93, Tom Burnett Jr. teamed up with Todd Beamer, Mark Bingham, Jeremy Glick and others to storm the cockpit that had been commandeered by al-Qaeda terrorists.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
OH, THOSE BELLS! SOUND ISN'T HEAVENLY FOR ALL A little less joyful noise, please. Two neighbors of the Rev. Robert H. Schuller's Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, Calif., say the church's $5 million stainless-steel carillon bothers their eardrums. The bells ring twice an hour daily, from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. "It's the most gosh-awful noise you ever heard. It's not even music," said Max Stauffer, who lives two houses away from the cathedral. Mr. Schuller's evangelical Protestant church has grown from a drive-in ministry to a Southern California landmark that broadcasts services to 20 million people weekly.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One way to pay tribute to any old great guy in South Philadelphia is to put on a dinner, sell tickets and invite stars. Mike Goffredo, the show-biz promoter and politicos' confidant who died two years ago at age 62, was not just any old great guy. So yesterday, they stood in the parking lot of a shuttered McDonald's at Broad and Carpenter and remembered him by dedicating an Avenue of the Arts carillon bell in his memory. This way, you see, Philadelphia has not heard the last of Mike Goffredo.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Grace Toohey, Staff Writer
Sweat drips from her forehead. She strikes her fists on the large keys, her precision evident in the smooth and clear music that sprawls for acres across Valley Forge National Historical Park. The steamy air of a summer night seems to saturate the 100-foot Washington Memorial Chapel steeple that houses the bell tower, where Ulla Laage orchestrates the 58-bell carillon with conviction. "These bells have a special tone to them," said Laage, a visiting carillonneur from Haslev, Demark, who kicked off the chapel's free summer concert series Wednesday night.
NEWS
February 24, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
As Neil D. Theobald approaches his 60th birthday, he began looking for a way to honor his late parents. The Temple University president found the answer emanating from a church in Cincinnati. It came in the form of a 1,000-pound vintage bell. The university has installed the refurbished, 150-year-old bell in a cradle atop Shusterman Hall, a former church that Temple renovated in 1997 for conference space. The bell will be illuminated at night and chime on each quarter-hour for those across the North Philadelphia campus to hear.
SPORTS
December 25, 2011 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
Jason Babin is locked and loaded, flattened out in that quirky sprinter's crouch, a helmet-tipped missile ready for launch. He appears to be positioned roughly two zip codes away from the ball, almost as though he is playing in another game, but then that is the very crux of the wide nine, the controversial defensive alignment that is, depending on your viewpoint, a stroke of blinding genius or of sheer idiocy. What it has done is help transform a heretofore ordinary player into a quarterback-inhaling beast.
NEWS
September 15, 2007
There were 40 heroes in the Sept. 11, 2001, crash of Flight 93 - not 39. The very notion that one passenger's name would be omitted from the nation's formal commemoration of the event is extremely disturbing. As for the prospect that the name would belong to one of the four likely leaders of the successful yet tragic effort to stop a hijacked plane from destroying a Washington landmark on 9/11, well, that's even worse. The hope, then, is that the father of one of those heroes will reconsider his vow to keep his son's name from the mountaintop memorial planned in Somerset County, Pa. As a passenger on Flight 93, Tom Burnett Jr. teamed up with Todd Beamer, Mark Bingham, Jeremy Glick and others to storm the cockpit that had been commandeered by al-Qaeda terrorists.
NEWS
April 7, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Janet Kitzmiller Dundore, 84, formerly of Flourtown, a carillonneur who performed locally and around the world, died of a heart attack March 31 at Blue Bell Place, an assisted living facility. In 1950, Mrs. Dundore and her husband Dwight, joined St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Whitemarsh. An accomplished pianist, she learned to play the church organ and became fascinated with the church's carillon -- stationary bells in the tower sounded by clappers controlled from a console. She told a reporter in 1991 that when she first tried playing the carillon, "I was scared to death at the volume that came out, I thought it was wonderful.
NEWS
June 27, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Washington Memorial Chapel in Valley Forge National Historical Park begins its series of summer carillon concerts on Wednesday. The concerts will be held rain or shine at 7:30 p.m. each Wednesday through August at the chapel on Route 23 in the park. The series will feature nine professional carillonneurs performing on the chapel's tower carillon and portable instruments. Highlights of the series include carillon music from the British Isles accompanied by an Irish bagpipe band.
NEWS
April 30, 2001 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the Church of the Holy Trinity, across from the northwest corner of Rittenhouse Square, the bell tower sang out yesterday, on a magnificent spring afternoon. In its first full-throated concert in more than a decade, the 25-bell carillon rang out to a square thick with hundreds strolling and sunning. And after a 4 p.m. ceremony celebrated the occasion, congregants at the Episcopal church joined the public on the square to hear the bells in glorious harmonies. "The bells are God's witnesses that God is . . . never out of season," the Rev. Terence C. Roper, rector of Holy Trinity, told more than 100 folks gathered inside the church.
NEWS
December 7, 2000 | By Elisa Ung, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The country's second-oldest carillon will soon ring again over Rittenhouse Square, perhaps as early as Christmas Eve. Its 25 bells, first hung atop the Church of the Holy Trinity in 1882, were donated by a Philadelphia dry-goods merchant in memory of his wife. Corrosion silenced them eight years ago, but a parishioner's hefty check started a restoration that began in February. Once rusty and dirty, the copper bells now gleam golden, and they can be played manually or electronically.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two years after believing that the controversy had been put to rest, officials at Bloomsburg University found themselves again facing the question of for whom the bells toll. Their answer, they hope, will bring lasting harmony both on and off the state-supported college campus in northeastern Pennsylvania. Beginning next month, homemade synthesizer versions of Hanukkah melodies such as "Maoz Tzur," as well as African American-themed songs such as "Happy Kwanzaa" and "Kwanzaa Child," all electronically altered by the school's music department to sound like bells, will emanate from the belfry of gold-domed Carver Hall, the oldest and most distinctive building on campus.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | By Elisa Ung, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1882, the 25 bells were hung in the 12-story tower of the Church of the Holy Trinity on Rittenhouse Square, the gift of a Philadelphia dry-goods merchant in memory of his wife. The second-oldest carillon in the United States - and the oldest manually operated one - rang regularly into the 1900s. But the bells eventually became corroded and fell out of use, and have been silent since a 1992 July Fourth celebration. Money for a major restoration always came up short. But last fall, a longtime church member offered a six-figure donation, and yesterday, workers began slowly lowering the bells from the tower using chains and ropes, starting a three-month renovation that will allow the carillon to be played manually and electronically.
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