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Carl Van Horn

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NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid the jabs and jibes of the highly charged presidential debate Tuesday night, Mitt Romney kicked off a local mystery when he referenced a recent college graduate who is having trouble finding a full-time job. Who is the young Philadelphia-area woman who, like many in her generation, is having difficulty getting into the workforce, even after earning a college degree? Sources in the Romney campaign speculate that the unmentioned millennial generation woman may have met the candidate when he appeared for a rally at Valley Forge Military Academy in Wayne on Sept.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The nation's economic boom is leaving out the working poor, who worry about earning enough to support their families, according to a new survey. The survey, by Rutgers University and the University of Connecticut, defined the working poor as families earning no more than twice the federal government's poverty threshold - which in 1997 was $12,802 for a family of three. "I think there are two myths which this study helps deal with," said Carl Van Horn, professor and director of the John Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The recession is over and the job market is improving, albeit barely, but the psychological aftermath of the worst financial downturn since the Great Depression persists, according to a sweeping national survey by Rutgers University. The majority of those surveyed say they believe that there has been a permanent and painful change in the nation's economy. Gone forever, they say, are the ability of the young to afford college, of employees to feel secure, and of workers to land good jobs at good pay. "What this reflects is how wide and deep the whole shock was," said Carl Van Horn, director of the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers, one of the study's coauthors.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid the jabs and jibes of the highly charged presidential debate Tuesday night, Mitt Romney fast-fueled a Philadelphia-area mystery when he referenced a recent college graduate who could not find full-time work. Who is the unnamed Generation Y woman whose story was profound enough to rate a mention from the Republican presidential nominee? As of Wednesday night, it wasn't clear. Officials of the Romney campaign were called, e-mailed, and generally bothered for comment, but none could provide a name.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's part time - and then there's the shift that Olivia Smith-Bey, 20, said she worked Wednesday at McDonald's. A stunning 56 minutes. "I got there at 2 p.m. and clocked in," she said. "Not even an hour. " There wasn't enough business, she said, so she was sent home, after spending $2.25 each way to get from her house in West Philadelphia to the restaurant in North Philadelphia. "I was upset," she said. Smith-Bey could be Exhibit A in a study of part-time workers that is to be released Thursday by Rutgers University's John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, in New Brunswick.
NEWS
November 8, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 10 million Americans - the highest number in 25 years - are out of work as the nation's economic crisis deepens, the Labor Department said yesterday. The nation's payrolls declined by 240,000 jobs last month, and the unemployment rate rose to 6.5 percent, from 6.1 percent in September. The unemployment rate last stood at 6.5 percent in March 1994. Total employment has fallen by 1.2 million jobs since January, with big job losses in manufacturing, construction, retailing and financial services.
NEWS
August 6, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Hunt started a new job July 18, which makes her somewhat of a national rarity - one of 117,000 new jobs added to the nation's payrolls in July, according to the U.S. Labor Department's Friday report. Hunt, of Cinnaminson, had a small part to play in the decline of the unemployment rate, which edged down from 9.2 percent in June to 9.1 percent in July. The private sector added 154,000 new jobs, but they were offset by deep cuts in government employment, particularly at the state and local levels, where payrolls decreased by 39,000.
NEWS
July 21, 2010 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sandra Greene, an unemployed project manager at an insurance company, has her theory about why, despite positive signs of growth in the economy, unemployment has been so persistently and frustratingly sticky. "I think the people who have jobs are afraid to lose them," Greene said. "The companies know that and are working them harder. " Greene's research consists of talking to friends who still have their jobs, but economists use statistics like the rise in productivity to buttress Greene's point.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jane Hunt started a new job July 18, which makes her somewhat of a national rarity - one of 117,000 new jobs added to the nation's payrolls in July, according to the U.S. Labor Department's Friday report. Hunt, of Cinnaminson, had a small part to play in the decline of the unemployment rate, which edged down from 9.2 percent in June to 9.1 percent in July. The private sector added 154,000 new jobs, but they were offset by deep cuts in government employment, particularly at the state and local levels, where payrolls decreased by 39,000.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two things may be happening - simultaneously - to Sandy Ellis-Johnson, 59, caught in a long cycle of part-time jobs when she needs full-time work. She may actually get a job, and she may become homeless as soon as Monday. The owner of the house where she's living is moving tenants out to make repairs. And with her part-time income of $7.25 an hour for 20 hours a week, Ellis-Johnson doesn't make enough to find another place. More than 7.5 million part-time American workers are older than 50, and for most of them, 4 out of 5, part-time work is a choice - with income as a motivator, but also job satisfaction and a desire to stay connected to the work world.
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BUSINESS
October 5, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two things may be happening - simultaneously - to Sandy Ellis-Johnson, 59, caught in a long cycle of part-time jobs when she needs full-time work. She may actually get a job, and she may become homeless as soon as Monday. The owner of the house where she's living is moving tenants out to make repairs. And with her part-time income of $7.25 an hour for 20 hours a week, Ellis-Johnson doesn't make enough to find another place. More than 7.5 million part-time American workers are older than 50, and for most of them, 4 out of 5, part-time work is a choice - with income as a motivator, but also job satisfaction and a desire to stay connected to the work world.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's part time - and then there's the shift that Olivia Smith-Bey, 20, said she worked Wednesday at McDonald's. A stunning 56 minutes. "I got there at 2 p.m. and clocked in," she said. "Not even an hour. " There wasn't enough business, she said, so she was sent home, after spending $2.25 each way to get from her house in West Philadelphia to the restaurant in North Philadelphia. "I was upset," she said. Smith-Bey could be Exhibit A in a study of part-time workers that is to be released Thursday by Rutgers University's John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, in New Brunswick.
NEWS
September 2, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the phone call came, Anthony Reynolds, a big man with a ready laugh, cried like a baby. His ex-wife, living in Texas, had taken their son, 7, to a hospital for an important but minor procedure, and the hospital had turned them away. No insurance. She called. He cried. "When I lost my job, I didn't have the heart to tell her that my benefits had been cut," he said. "I was so ashamed," he said. "I'm 1,800 miles from my kids, and I can't do anything for them. " By the statistics economists gather, the recession officially ended five years ago, in June 2009.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The recession is over and the job market is improving, albeit barely, but the psychological aftermath of the worst financial downturn since the Great Depression persists, according to a sweeping national survey by Rutgers University. The majority of those surveyed say they believe that there has been a permanent and painful change in the nation's economy. Gone forever, they say, are the ability of the young to afford college, of employees to feel secure, and of workers to land good jobs at good pay. "What this reflects is how wide and deep the whole shock was," said Carl Van Horn, director of the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers, one of the study's coauthors.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid the jabs and jibes of the highly charged presidential debate Tuesday night, Mitt Romney fast-fueled a Philadelphia-area mystery when he referenced a recent college graduate who could not find full-time work. Who is the unnamed Generation Y woman whose story was profound enough to rate a mention from the Republican presidential nominee? As of Wednesday night, it wasn't clear. Officials of the Romney campaign were called, e-mailed, and generally bothered for comment, but none could provide a name.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid the jabs and jibes of the highly charged presidential debate Tuesday night, Mitt Romney kicked off a local mystery when he referenced a recent college graduate who is having trouble finding a full-time job. Who is the young Philadelphia-area woman who, like many in her generation, is having difficulty getting into the workforce, even after earning a college degree? Sources in the Romney campaign speculate that the unmentioned millennial generation woman may have met the candidate when he appeared for a rally at Valley Forge Military Academy in Wayne on Sept.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a time of life normally suffused with hope and energy, 22-year-old Evelyn De Jesus has little to be optimistic about. The 2008 graduate of Mastbaum Vocational/Technical School did a year at Pennsylvania State University but could not afford it and dropped out. Once dreaming of becoming a lawyer, De Jesus - who lives in North Philadelphia with her unemployed boyfriend and 2-year-old son - now earns poverty wages of $10 an hour at a...
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
College graduates encountering today's tough job market often wish they could hit the rewind button, a new study from Rutgers University finds. Maybe then, they wouldn't face a situation in which four graduates in 10 get first jobs that don't use their degrees and work at low salaries barely covering their student-loan payments. Maybe then, more than half would have full-time jobs. According to the Rutgers study, released Wednesday, only one in two college graduates who earned diplomas between 2006 and 2011 now has a full-time job, and of those, four in 10 work in jobs that don't even require four-year degrees.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writers
With a degree in economics, Yevgeniy Levich, 23, may understand better than most why so many people his age are out of work. He blames the lack of jobs on a myriad of reasons: the lack of regulation in banking that led to this economic crisis; a failed theory that lowering taxes leads to investment; a proposal for infrastructure jobs that doesn't do much for someone who doesn't work with his hands - that's all the macro stuff. Microeconomics is this: Levich, a Central High School graduate with degrees in economics and journalism from New York University, is still living with his parents in Northeast Philadelphia and hoping that he'll land a job as a nightclub office assistant.
NEWS
August 6, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Hunt started a new job July 18, which makes her somewhat of a national rarity - one of 117,000 new jobs added to the nation's payrolls in July, according to the U.S. Labor Department's Friday report. Hunt, of Cinnaminson, had a small part to play in the decline of the unemployment rate, which edged down from 9.2 percent in June to 9.1 percent in July. The private sector added 154,000 new jobs, but they were offset by deep cuts in government employment, particularly at the state and local levels, where payrolls decreased by 39,000.
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