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Carlos Santana

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NEWS
November 10, 1990 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
On his excellent new album, Spirits Dancing in the Flesh, Carlos Santana concocted a medley, "Mother Earth," that joined his melodic concepts with those of John Coltrane and Jimi Hendrix. While some viewed this as groundbreaking, it merely formalized the approach that has guided Santana's live performances for decades. Without ever creating something as clunky as a "world music" hybrid, the guitarist has shown that by integrating musical elements from a variety of cultures, it is possible to create a wholly engaging forum for open-minded, interactive music.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1994 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER Dan DeLuca, Sara Sherr, Tom Moon and Sam Wood also contributed to this article
"We didn't want to come out as a blueprint of yesterday," Carlos Santana reports from his home outside San Francisco, "so we changed everything around. " The live Sacred Fire (Polydor), released less than a year ago, bears little resemblance to his current show. "We do anything and everything to constantly keep all the windows and the doors open in the house so it's vented. You know, you don't want it to smell like last night. " While Sacred Fire includes a smattering of new tunes among the inevitable hits, at the Mann on Sunday Santana will play a smattering of even newer tunes among the inevitable hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2000 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Carlos Santana, the Woodstock-era guitarist whose album of collaborations with modern-rock artists, Supernatural, blossomed into a multiplatinum success, capped his comeback year with a near-sweep of the major Grammy Award categories last night at Los Angeles' Staples Center. The Mexican-born artist won for album of the year and rock album, while various songs from Supernatural took six other prizes - among them record of the year for "Smooth," Santana's first-ever No. 1 single.
NEWS
October 7, 1991 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL MALLY
IT WAS CHILLY and rainy, but Carlos Santana and his band, Santana, drew a crowd at a "be-in" in Fairmount Park. Yesterday's concert attracted about 50,000, according to organizers.
SPORTS
May 16, 2011
ATLANTA - In a pregame ceremony, Major League Baseball honored Ernie Banks, Carlos Santana (the musician, not the catcher), and Morgan Freeman. It was an odd collection, but a part of the festivities for the Civil Rights Game. Phillies president David Montgomery was among the special guests, along with commissioner Bud Selig. The fifth annual game was moved to Atlanta for the first time after previously being in Cincinnati and Memphis. It was Hank Aaron's idea to bring the game to Atlanta.
NEWS
February 25, 2000
Viva Carlos! Viva Santana! You won eight Grammy awards Wednesday night, fitting recognition of more than 30 years of sweet playing. In the 1960s and 1970s, your band - one of the first multicultural, world-music groups - was a hit-maker, the high point of the original Woodstock with the blazing "Soul Sacrifice. " Amid the thick forest of electric guitarists, yours is one of the few truly distinctive sounds, a mastery of "sustain" and Latin melody. Felicidades, hombre! All the time, you've stuck to your humane philosophy of harmony among people.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1995 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
The typically breezy Mann Music Center was as still and humid as a sauna on Friday night, but that didn't stop a near-capacity crowd from coming to see Santana heat up the stage. Veteran Latin-rocker Carlos Santana and a 6-member backing band sweated their way through a percolating set that drew on salsa, merengue, reggae, jazz, blues, gospel, and, of course, rock. The music was so danceable and assertive, I doubt that anyone at the Mann worried about anything, including the weather, during the two-hour set. The supple rhythm section - two percussionists, a bassist, and Philadelphia native Billy Johnson on drums - shifted dynamics often enough to keep Santana's long jams engaging.
SPORTS
May 16, 2011
ATLANTA - The public-address system at Turner Field wasn't too clear and most of the early arrivals probably weren't paying a lot of attention when various dignitaries from baseball's Civil Rights Weekend ceremonies were being introduced on the field before the Phillies-Braves game. But when noted musician Carlos Santana, winner of the Beacon of Change Award, stepped to the podium, his parting shot rang out loud and clear. "The people of Atlanta should be ashamed of themselves," he said before going back to his seat.
NEWS
February 20, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Depardieu shrugs off flak for going dark to play Dumas Gerard Depardieu yesterday dismissed critics who have attacked him for darkening his skin to play mixed-race author Alexandre Dumas in the new film L'autre Dumas. Patrick Lozes of France's Representative Council for Black Associations said it's insulting that a white actor was cast to play Dumas, whose grandmother was a Haitian slave. "It is a way of saying that we don't have any black actor who has the talent to play [Dumas]
NEWS
February 12, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Carlos Santana, 60, was having hallucinations three years ago. He said he was confused and disoriented and complained that people were talking to him from inside his TV set. So Santana tried to check himself into a hospital. He was told to go home, take two Tylenols and see a doctor in the morning. Santana, who has a history of mental illness, was frustrated, said Assistant District Attorney Mark Gilson yesterday. The next day, Jan. 29, 1997, Santana took out his anger on a 35-year-old fellow resident of a boarding home on Montrose Street near 18th, said Gilson.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Carlos Santana has been and done many things in his 40-year-plus career as a guitarist and composer, but one thing the Mexican-born titan of psychedelic rock has avoided, until now, was an album solely dedicated to his ethnic roots. Santana, 66, who plays the Borgata on June 13 and 14, just never felt the need to make a Latin music album. "For us, it's a way of life, not a product or a project," he explains. "All in due time. " "Due time" arrived in May, when Santana's latest album, Corazon , appeared.
SPORTS
June 17, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
PRETTY MUCH everything about Stephen Strasburg's return from the disabled list went well except the result. Washington's ace righthander allowed one run and one hit in five innings, but the Nationals' offense did nothing to support him in yesterday's 2-0 loss to the Indians in Cleveland. "I felt really good and definitely could have gone for a few more innings, but they didn't want me to," he said. "It was good to be out there after 2 weeks. " Strasburg (3-6) was activated before the game and made his first start since May 31 when he strained a muscle in his back.
SPORTS
April 11, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
KYLE DRABEK won for the first time since June, Edwin Encarnacion homered and the Toronto Blue Jays beat the visiting Boston Red Sox, 7-3, Tuesday night. Drabek (1-0) struggled in two starts against Boston last season, allowing 12 runs and 15 hits and taking the loss in a 14-1 home defeat on June 12, his last start before being demoted to Triple A. The righthander, the Phillies' first-round draft pick in 2006, was much sharper this time, giving up one run and three hits in 5 1/3 innings and setting down nine straight in one stretch.
SPORTS
May 16, 2011
ATLANTA - The public-address system at Turner Field wasn't too clear and most of the early arrivals probably weren't paying a lot of attention when various dignitaries from baseball's Civil Rights Weekend ceremonies were being introduced on the field before the Phillies-Braves game. But when noted musician Carlos Santana, winner of the Beacon of Change Award, stepped to the podium, his parting shot rang out loud and clear. "The people of Atlanta should be ashamed of themselves," he said before going back to his seat.
SPORTS
May 16, 2011
ATLANTA - In a pregame ceremony, Major League Baseball honored Ernie Banks, Carlos Santana (the musician, not the catcher), and Morgan Freeman. It was an odd collection, but a part of the festivities for the Civil Rights Game. Phillies president David Montgomery was among the special guests, along with commissioner Bud Selig. The fifth annual game was moved to Atlanta for the first time after previously being in Cincinnati and Memphis. It was Hank Aaron's idea to bring the game to Atlanta.
SPORTS
June 14, 2010 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Collision course Washington's Adam Dunn is a moose. He's also a former University of Texas football player. Cleveland's rookie catcher, Carlos Santana, found this out the hard way Sunday when he got freight-trained at home plate by the Nationals' 6-foot-6, 287-pound first baseman in the second inning. Santana moved to his left to possibly catch an overthrow when he inadvertently stepped into the path of the onrushing Dunn. Santana was knocked off his feet and did a backward somersault.
NEWS
February 20, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Depardieu shrugs off flak for going dark to play Dumas Gerard Depardieu yesterday dismissed critics who have attacked him for darkening his skin to play mixed-race author Alexandre Dumas in the new film L'autre Dumas. Patrick Lozes of France's Representative Council for Black Associations said it's insulting that a white actor was cast to play Dumas, whose grandmother was a Haitian slave. "It is a way of saying that we don't have any black actor who has the talent to play [Dumas]
NEWS
February 25, 2000
Viva Carlos! Viva Santana! You won eight Grammy awards Wednesday night, fitting recognition of more than 30 years of sweet playing. In the 1960s and 1970s, your band - one of the first multicultural, world-music groups - was a hit-maker, the high point of the original Woodstock with the blazing "Soul Sacrifice. " Amid the thick forest of electric guitarists, yours is one of the few truly distinctive sounds, a mastery of "sustain" and Latin melody. Felicidades, hombre! All the time, you've stuck to your humane philosophy of harmony among people.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2000 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Carlos Santana, the Woodstock-era guitarist whose album of collaborations with modern-rock artists, Supernatural, blossomed into a multiplatinum success, capped his comeback year with a near-sweep of the major Grammy Award categories last night at Los Angeles' Staples Center. The Mexican-born artist won for album of the year and rock album, while various songs from Supernatural took six other prizes - among them record of the year for "Smooth," Santana's first-ever No. 1 single.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
They are infuriating and enthralling, often all too predictable and other times so surprising you wonder "ON WHAT PLANET have the voters been residing the last year?" We're talking, of course, about the Grammy Awards, the music industry's annual pat on its collective back and trip to the bank, happening again tomorrow night at 8 in a live telecast on Channel 3. No, a winner couldn't raise much at the hock shop for one of those miniature gold grammophones (shades of the "wind up" music machine age)
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