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Carmen Miranda

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NEWS
October 17, 1989 | BY DONALD KAUL
As regular readers of this column both know, I generally try to keep things pretty light. I realize that many of you lead difficult lives and the last thing you need when you pick up your newspaper is overweening significance. That's why I concentrate on inconsequential fluff like Congress, the National Rifle Association and Dan Quayle. I may ween occasionally, but I never overween. But every once in a while an issue comes along that's just too important to ignore, one that touches our lives in a meaningful way and demands attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Birds of a different feather flock together in Rio , Carlos Saldanha's joyous carnival   of animation celebrating avian (and human) biodiversity. Winging and singing creatures frolic in Brazil's capital of fun. Storks samba! Toucans tumba! Parrots party in kaleidoscopic formations to the music of Sergio Mendes! For Rio-born Saldanha, imaginative director of Ice Age and Robots , the featured breed is the Indigo Macaw, an endangered species gorgeously rendered by animation artists and hilariously realized by the vocal talents of Jesse Eisenberg and Anne Hathaway.
SPORTS
January 18, 1996 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the glittery halls and ballrooms of the luxurious Biltmore Hotel, where baseball set up shop this week, photos of rich and famous visitors - Spencer Tracy, Lucille Ball, Carmen Miranda - adorn every wall. And now, after three fruitless days of roaming those halls and ballrooms, Phillies general manager Lee Thomas knows the truth: He had a better chance of trading for Carmen Miranda this week than he did of trading for a decent starting pitcher. "We've talked to so many clubs here, but I don't really think we ever got into a conversation with any club that was the right fit for us," a frustrated Thomas said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1990 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here she comes. As a matter of fact, here they all come. This weekend, Philadelphians will have an opportunity to get an advance look at the 50 who will be competing in the Miss America Pageant in Atlantic City. They will arrive here tomorrow for a round of activities that will include dining at a couple of the city's better-known spots. Tomorrow night, 25 of the contestants - and their chaperones, naturally - will be at Downey's, Front and South Streets, for a buffet dinner, starting at 6:30.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1989 | People magazine, Marilyn Beck, the New York Post, the New York Daily News and United Press International contributed to this report
TAN-MAN HAMILTON JUDGES HIS PEERS Sylvester Stallone rates a nine on the George Hamilton Tan-o-meter, while the ashen Madonna gets only a one. Us magazine asked the perpetually bronzed Hamilton to rank the tans in Hollywood and, after Stallone, he gave old friend Elizabeth Taylor an eight, saying, "Elizabeth tans more easily than I do. " Corbin Bernsen of "L.A. Law" ("a contender in the George Hamilton Cocoa Butter Open in the teak or mahogany category") gets a seven, Farrah Fawcett a six, Kurt Russell a five, Michelle Pfeiffer a four and Meryl Streep a three.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By Inquirer Staff Writer Dianna Marder
Lady Down-in-the-Mouth Debbie Anderson, 50, of Haddon Township, works as a caricaturist at parties and weddings, but just can't seem to stay away from sewing machines and glue guns. Each year, she enters the Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire's costume contest. This year, she won with the getup you see here - a dragon swallowing a damsel in distress. She calls it Lady Down-in-the-Mouth. Anderson has learned a thing or two about costume-making over the years. "It's hard to be evil when you're short," says Anderson, who is 5-foot-4.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
"I saw a werewolf with a Chinese menu in his hand walking the streets of Soho in the rain he was looking for a place called Lee How Fook gonna get a big dish of beef chow mein Ah-oooooh! . . . werewolves of London. " Warren Zevon Dressing for dinner takes on an entirely new meaning on Halloween night, when several area restaurants will operate with skeletal staffs. In the costume sense, that is. Costumed customers will likewise be seen all over town.
NEWS
January 20, 1995 | By Tamara Chuang, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Her mission: to get people thinking about the price of ignorance. Her credo: "Xenophobia is learned, so it can be unlearned. " Her medium: paints - acrylics, to be specific. Native New Yorker Soraida Martinez, who grew up in a mixed-race family of Puerto Rican origin, creates vibrant works that beckon understanding between the races and the sexes. Her latest exhibition, at the Markeim Gallery in Haddonfield, is called Soraida's Verdadism, or "Soraida's truth. " Verdadism, from the Spanish word for truth, is a term she coined for her series of Cubistlike, in-your-face paintings.
NEWS
January 6, 1987 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Johnny Lucas, a mere human, seemed to be in danger of being swallowed up in a psychedelic implosion. He was surrounded and dwarfed by an incredible dazzlement of vivid cloth, flamboyant plumes, uncountable tiny mirrors and improbable images of humans, animals and mythic beings. Lucas, with a sweeping gesture inadequate to his surroundings, presented Exhibit A in defense of the decision to twice postpone the 1987 Mummers Parade. "I can't tell you how many thousands and thousands of dollars are represented here," he said in the storeroom of costumes for the Golden Sunrise New Year's Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Every time he comes to America, Caetano Veloso has to hear about how he's the Brazilian Bob Dylan, the reigning poet and thinker of his age. He's embarrassed by the comparison. Puzzled, too. "Well, uhmmm, it does get tiresome," demurred Veloso, 60. "And it's a little lazy, really. I love Dylan, I can't escape him. But I never set out to be like him or anyone else. " In fact, divining the Anglo equivalent of Veloso - who appears next Sunday at the Kimmel Center on a tour to herald his newly translated memoir, Tropical Truth: A Story of Music & Revolution in Brazil, and double CD, Live in Bahia - is an exercise in futility.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Birds of a different feather flock together in Rio , Carlos Saldanha's joyous carnival   of animation celebrating avian (and human) biodiversity. Winging and singing creatures frolic in Brazil's capital of fun. Storks samba! Toucans tumba! Parrots party in kaleidoscopic formations to the music of Sergio Mendes! For Rio-born Saldanha, imaginative director of Ice Age and Robots , the featured breed is the Indigo Macaw, an endangered species gorgeously rendered by animation artists and hilariously realized by the vocal talents of Jesse Eisenberg and Anne Hathaway.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Every time he comes to America, Caetano Veloso has to hear about how he's the Brazilian Bob Dylan, the reigning poet and thinker of his age. He's embarrassed by the comparison. Puzzled, too. "Well, uhmmm, it does get tiresome," demurred Veloso, 60. "And it's a little lazy, really. I love Dylan, I can't escape him. But I never set out to be like him or anyone else. " In fact, divining the Anglo equivalent of Veloso - who appears next Sunday at the Kimmel Center on a tour to herald his newly translated memoir, Tropical Truth: A Story of Music & Revolution in Brazil, and double CD, Live in Bahia - is an exercise in futility.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By Inquirer Staff Writer Dianna Marder
Lady Down-in-the-Mouth Debbie Anderson, 50, of Haddon Township, works as a caricaturist at parties and weddings, but just can't seem to stay away from sewing machines and glue guns. Each year, she enters the Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire's costume contest. This year, she won with the getup you see here - a dragon swallowing a damsel in distress. She calls it Lady Down-in-the-Mouth. Anderson has learned a thing or two about costume-making over the years. "It's hard to be evil when you're short," says Anderson, who is 5-foot-4.
SPORTS
January 18, 1996 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the glittery halls and ballrooms of the luxurious Biltmore Hotel, where baseball set up shop this week, photos of rich and famous visitors - Spencer Tracy, Lucille Ball, Carmen Miranda - adorn every wall. And now, after three fruitless days of roaming those halls and ballrooms, Phillies general manager Lee Thomas knows the truth: He had a better chance of trading for Carmen Miranda this week than he did of trading for a decent starting pitcher. "We've talked to so many clubs here, but I don't really think we ever got into a conversation with any club that was the right fit for us," a frustrated Thomas said yesterday.
NEWS
January 20, 1995 | By Tamara Chuang, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Her mission: to get people thinking about the price of ignorance. Her credo: "Xenophobia is learned, so it can be unlearned. " Her medium: paints - acrylics, to be specific. Native New Yorker Soraida Martinez, who grew up in a mixed-race family of Puerto Rican origin, creates vibrant works that beckon understanding between the races and the sexes. Her latest exhibition, at the Markeim Gallery in Haddonfield, is called Soraida's Verdadism, or "Soraida's truth. " Verdadism, from the Spanish word for truth, is a term she coined for her series of Cubistlike, in-your-face paintings.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
Sombrero-capped trumpet players blasting brassy music . . . Dapper Cuban band leaders hollering "Babaloo!" . . . Brazilian dancers shimmying with fruit salad atop their heads . . . For a long time, the term "Latin music" has sparked less-than-accurate images for many Americans. As the Hispanic population in the United States continues to grow, Latin music - a blanket term that covers numerous musical genres - is gaining new ground and acceptance. Crossover acts such as Gloria Estefan have scored hits over the years in the states, and non-Hispanic artists as diverse as jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, soul singer Wilson Pickett, ragtime pianist Scott Joplin, blues innovator W.C. Handy and rock 'n' roller Chuck Berry have drawn from Latin influences.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1990 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here she comes. As a matter of fact, here they all come. This weekend, Philadelphians will have an opportunity to get an advance look at the 50 who will be competing in the Miss America Pageant in Atlantic City. They will arrive here tomorrow for a round of activities that will include dining at a couple of the city's better-known spots. Tomorrow night, 25 of the contestants - and their chaperones, naturally - will be at Downey's, Front and South Streets, for a buffet dinner, starting at 6:30.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
"I saw a werewolf with a Chinese menu in his hand walking the streets of Soho in the rain he was looking for a place called Lee How Fook gonna get a big dish of beef chow mein Ah-oooooh! . . . werewolves of London. " Warren Zevon Dressing for dinner takes on an entirely new meaning on Halloween night, when several area restaurants will operate with skeletal staffs. In the costume sense, that is. Costumed customers will likewise be seen all over town.
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | BY DONALD KAUL
As regular readers of this column both know, I generally try to keep things pretty light. I realize that many of you lead difficult lives and the last thing you need when you pick up your newspaper is overweening significance. That's why I concentrate on inconsequential fluff like Congress, the National Rifle Association and Dan Quayle. I may ween occasionally, but I never overween. But every once in a while an issue comes along that's just too important to ignore, one that touches our lives in a meaningful way and demands attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1989 | People magazine, Marilyn Beck, the New York Post, the New York Daily News and United Press International contributed to this report
TAN-MAN HAMILTON JUDGES HIS PEERS Sylvester Stallone rates a nine on the George Hamilton Tan-o-meter, while the ashen Madonna gets only a one. Us magazine asked the perpetually bronzed Hamilton to rank the tans in Hollywood and, after Stallone, he gave old friend Elizabeth Taylor an eight, saying, "Elizabeth tans more easily than I do. " Corbin Bernsen of "L.A. Law" ("a contender in the George Hamilton Cocoa Butter Open in the teak or mahogany category") gets a seven, Farrah Fawcett a six, Kurt Russell a five, Michelle Pfeiffer a four and Meryl Streep a three.
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