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Carmina Burana

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NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Carmina Burana , the Carl Orff cantata that inspires extremes of adoration and revulsion, emerged a changed piece Thursday night. It ascended from its typical semiprofessional performance circumstances to the best this city can offer: the Philadelphia Singers Chorale at its full-tilt best, with the Philadelphia Orchestra in precise form under guest conductor Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos. Frühbeck came into this string of Kimmel Center performances (opening Thursday and continuing Saturday)
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | By TOM DI NARDO, Daily News Classical Music Writer
The Choral Arts Society and full orchestra under conductor Sean Deibler performs Carl Orff's earthy cantata, "Carmina Burana," at the Academy of Music Sunday at 7:30 p.m. This excellent ensemble usually offers major yet rare choral works that deserve more frequent hearings, but this time aims the varied skills of its choristers at this more familiar, undeniably powerful work. "Carmina Burana" is a unique blend of hedonistic drama and hypnotic rhythms, a work with a completely unique signature.
NEWS
August 6, 1986 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Audiences love John Butler's lusty ballet, Carmina Burana, and its throbbing, pseudo-antique score by Carl Orff. Many critics find it vulgar. It's as speciously medieval as the images on modern Tarot cards. But it has been a seat-filler for many dance companies since Butler created it for the New York City Opera in 1959. One reason is a blatant sexuality that confirms the old chestnut that dance is the vertical expression of a horizontal idea. In a triumphant performance by the Pennsylvania Ballet and a 100-voice choir at the Mann Music Center last night, torrents of wild paganism and pounding movement were tempered by moments of tenderness.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1990 | By Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Ballet brought one of its old favorites, "Carmina Burana," out of repertory mothballs last night at the Shubert Theatre and proceeded to give an electrifying demonstration of just why this show-bizzy, glamorous number is the company's most requested dance. Although it wasn't in the active repertory during Robert Weiss' tenure as artistic director (1982-1989), "Carmina Burana" wasn't forgotten. Frankly, it's not hard to understand why. For starts, there is Carl Orff's spine- tingling choral music, which takes its text from medieval poems celebrating life's earthy pleasures and delicious vices.
NEWS
February 17, 2003 | By Elizabeth Zimmer FOR THE INQUIRER
Degas fever grips the region as the Philadelphia Museum of Art show and Matthew Neenan's new ballet open. At the Art Museum, long lines and a gift shop full of ballet trinkets testify to the appeal of the French painter, born in 1834, who made his ballerina fetish a lifelong study. At the Academy of Music, the Pennsylvania Ballet premiered Le Travail, corps member Neenan's fourth choreography for the troupe and the first work for which it has commissioned an original score. Media-based composer Robert Maggio, 39, begins his ambitious 25-minute piece with a quote from Adolphe Adam's music for Giselle, but it soon develops into dense waves of practically Prokofievian drama, more elaborate by half than what occurs on stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2007 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Pennsylvania Ballet unleashed a triumph Thursday night, with its world premiere of a steamy, explosive new Carmina Burana at the Academy of Music. Any worries about replacing John Butler's version - a favorite for four decades - now can be forgotten. The hour-long ballet, choreographed by corps de ballet member and de facto resident choreographer Matthew Neenan, sped along in a revel of eruptive jumps, sexy duets and full, lush ensemble sections. Loosely based on a series of poems about drinking, gambling, fate, life and love, it was danced in an ever-changing variety of skin-tight costumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1986 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
The Pilobolus dance group can make six bodies look like one, one body look like six, and however many bodies there actually are up there on stage look like an animal only a 6-year-old has seen in his dreams. The company makes these complicated configurations seem easy. But the one thing Pilobolus finds difficult is to refrain from humor. It takes a droll frame of mind to name a company after a fungus, and drollery sometimes informs the titles of its dances, as well. Pilobolus' most famous piece is called Untitled; and it's partly the title that has given the dance its fame.
NEWS
March 30, 2004 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In celebration of its 130th anniversary, the Mendelssohn Club accomplished what is, for many, the impossible: Its Sunday concert at the Kimmel Center gave you reason to respect Carl Orff's annoyingly popular Carmina Burana. These choral settings of ribald poetry by sodden medieval monks have always given audiences reasons to be at least superficially excited. Whether drinking songs or dreamy odes to queens and goddesses, the tunes have the insistent simplicity (though not the charm)
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Nothing all that unusual seemed likely to unfold at the Philadelphia Orchestra's second consecutive subscription week with principal guest conductor Stéphane Denève: A potentially pop-slanted John Williams film score suite; Graffiti , a choral work by the increasingly popular Magnus Lindberg; and excerpts from Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet ballet. Yet the orchestra, Philadelphia Singers Chorale, and the audience had plenty to contend with at Thursday's concert, which was one of the more distinctive programs of the season - a confounding, mixed success.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
The Pennsylvania Ballet was not to be outdone by the weather last night. The program presented at the Mann Music Center was every bit as sizzling as the air. The major portion of the program was given over to Carmina Burana, John Butler's intense interpretation of Carl Orff's fire-and-brimstone score. The program opened with Ravel's seething Bolero, choreographed by artistic director Robert Weiss. Sandwiched between the two works were dazzling virtuoso pas de deux - the high-flying Corsaire, which featured an absolutely outstanding performance by Marin Boieru, and Balanchine's take on Neopolitan verve, Tarantella.
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NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Most members of the Philharmonic of Southern New Jersey don't play music for a living. Rather, they live to play music. Thus a physicist, a pharmacist, a data analyst, and a lawyer or two will be among the performers onstage at the amateur ensemble's 25th anniversary concert. "This fills a need in my life," says Neil Aaronson, 35, a violist who lives in Mays Landing and teaches physics at Stockton University. "Playing the viola makes me feel whole. " I met Aaronson and others in the respected 95-member Philharmonic during a rehearsal last week for the anniversary concert.
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Nothing all that unusual seemed likely to unfold at the Philadelphia Orchestra's second consecutive subscription week with principal guest conductor Stéphane Denève: A potentially pop-slanted John Williams film score suite; Graffiti , a choral work by the increasingly popular Magnus Lindberg; and excerpts from Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet ballet. Yet the orchestra, Philadelphia Singers Chorale, and the audience had plenty to contend with at Thursday's concert, which was one of the more distinctive programs of the season - a confounding, mixed success.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Ballet gave an encore of a signature work and added another Balanchine ballet to its repertoire for its opening Thursday night at the Academy of Music. Both were part of the company's yearlong 50th anniversary celebration. Carmina Burana has been in the troupe's repertoire since 1966, when John Butler staged his 1959 work on Pennsylvania Ballet to Carl Orff's secular cantata. In 2007, choreographer-in-residence Matthew Neenan reinterpreted the ballet with new choreography, costumes, and sets.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Carmina Burana , the Carl Orff cantata that inspires extremes of adoration and revulsion, emerged a changed piece Thursday night. It ascended from its typical semiprofessional performance circumstances to the best this city can offer: the Philadelphia Singers Chorale at its full-tilt best, with the Philadelphia Orchestra in precise form under guest conductor Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos. Frühbeck came into this string of Kimmel Center performances (opening Thursday and continuing Saturday)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2010 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Pennsylvania Ballet premiered Matthew Neenan's Carmina Burana at the Academy of Music in March 2007 to great fanfare, then took it to New York's City Center, then packed it away. It hadn't been seen since until Thursday night, when the company brought it back to the Academy on a program with Balanchine's The Four Temperaments. Carmina is a rich piece with a large cast, many (quirky) costume changes, and Carl Orff's rowdy "secular cantata" performed by the Orchestra of the Pennsylvania Ballet and the Philadelphia Singers Chorale.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2007 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Pennsylvania Ballet unleashed a triumph Thursday night, with its world premiere of a steamy, explosive new Carmina Burana at the Academy of Music. Any worries about replacing John Butler's version - a favorite for four decades - now can be forgotten. The hour-long ballet, choreographed by corps de ballet member and de facto resident choreographer Matthew Neenan, sped along in a revel of eruptive jumps, sexy duets and full, lush ensemble sections. Loosely based on a series of poems about drinking, gambling, fate, life and love, it was danced in an ever-changing variety of skin-tight costumes.
NEWS
March 6, 2007 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
John Butler's rousing Carmina Burana has been a signature piece for Pennsylvania Ballet for four decades. This week, the company is doing something drastic: replacing it. "I love Butler's Carmina Burana," artistic director Roy Kaiser said. "I grew up with it. I danced it for many years. " And that may have been part of the problem, he said. "For us, anyway, it started to look a little dated. I just didn't think we did it as well as we should have. " So Matthew Neenan, the corps de ballet dancer who in the last decade has become the company's de facto resident choreographer, was chosen to turn Carmina from a modest ballet of four principals and 12 corps dancers to a larger, more lush work for 32 dancers.
NEWS
March 30, 2004 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In celebration of its 130th anniversary, the Mendelssohn Club accomplished what is, for many, the impossible: Its Sunday concert at the Kimmel Center gave you reason to respect Carl Orff's annoyingly popular Carmina Burana. These choral settings of ribald poetry by sodden medieval monks have always given audiences reasons to be at least superficially excited. Whether drinking songs or dreamy odes to queens and goddesses, the tunes have the insistent simplicity (though not the charm)
NEWS
February 17, 2003 | By Elizabeth Zimmer FOR THE INQUIRER
Degas fever grips the region as the Philadelphia Museum of Art show and Matthew Neenan's new ballet open. At the Art Museum, long lines and a gift shop full of ballet trinkets testify to the appeal of the French painter, born in 1834, who made his ballerina fetish a lifelong study. At the Academy of Music, the Pennsylvania Ballet premiered Le Travail, corps member Neenan's fourth choreography for the troupe and the first work for which it has commissioned an original score. Media-based composer Robert Maggio, 39, begins his ambitious 25-minute piece with a quote from Adolphe Adam's music for Giselle, but it soon develops into dense waves of practically Prokofievian drama, more elaborate by half than what occurs on stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Everybody loves Carmina. Carl Orff's Carmina Burana, that is. Listeners stood up and cheered as if they didn't want to go home Thursday night at the Philadelphia Orchestra concert at the Academy of Music. "Did you see the maestro!" one listener enthused after the program, his arms mimicking Wolfgang Sawallisch's signals for the thumping, infectious music. But the maestro didn't "conduct the audience," as interpreters of this crowd-pleaser sometimes do. The music wasn't terribly snazzy, extra fast or enhanced with tricks, like speeding up, slowing down or stretching out already emphatic moments.
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