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Carnegie Hall

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NEWS
January 2, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Carnegie Hall, more than any other American concert hall, has transcended real estate to be a home and source of dreams. It is a goal for musicians, a validation of life's work, a testing ground for musical ideas. Does any young musician grow up in this country without the ambition to perform there? Carnegie is 33 years younger than the Academy of Music. But in its 100 years, it has taken its place at the very center of performance in this country. The hall's eminence in American legend is the focus of Carnegie Hall at 100: A Place of Dreams, a PBS special seen at 9 tonight on Channels 23, 52 and 39. (It will be aired on Channel 12 at 9 p.m. Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1994 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Verdi's Overture to La Forza del Destino was one of the favorite encores of Riccardo Muti and the Philadelphia Orchestra during Muti's tenure as music director from 1980-92. La Forza's brusque passions seemed to belong as much to the Philadelphians as to their consistently uncompromising maestro. So it was a poignant experience to be a Philadelphian sitting in Carnegie Hall on Thursday night, listening to Muti and the Vienna Philharmonic's blazing rendition of this Verdi overture, which brought an entire audience to its feet.
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Vienna Philharmonic, which on Thursday performed the first of two concerts at Carnegie Hall, is probably the only orchestra that overshadows its conductor. The philharmonic's playing represents a single artistic point of view that comes from deep in the history of the ensemble rather than from its current conductor. It is a viewpoint stemming from Vienna's great days from Haydn to Strauss, for the philharmonic is not an orchestra to plunge into the new, or to survey other nations' music very much.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Whatever else it shapes up to be, 1990-91 is the season of inescapable anniversaries. Carnegie Hall will be 100 years old on May 5, 1991, and Dec. 5, 1991 will be the 200th anniversary of Mozart's death. Carnegie Hall's season - and unofficially the music season of the nation - will get under way tomorrow night, when Andre Previn conducts the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Lincoln Center, New York's other major musical showcase, is noting the Mozart anniversary with a marathon of concerts, symposiums, television events and exhibits whose flavor so far suggests a database rather than a musical occasion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1994 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When does a nascent career become a major one? Pinning down a single defining moment is usually an elusive exercise, but such a time may be at hand for violinist Leila Josefowicz. The signs have been brewing for years. Though just 16, she's played with orchestras obscure to renowned, shared the stage with Johnny Carson and Bob Hope, and has landed a spot studying at the Curtis Institute with not one but two brand-name teachers. But no musical career is complete until it makes a nod to the electronic age, and with the recent signing of a five-year recording contract with Philips, Josefowicz is poised to become a name to rival the Perlmans and Zukermans of the violin world.
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Among orchestras enduring crises in this country - and far more are than are not - the Detroit Symphony's catalogue of setbacks has been severe enough to put you in mind of Job. Struggling to stay afloat, amid fiscal, social and artistic problems in a racially divided city that also is floundering, the orchestra is at the mercy of a recalcitrant Michigan Legislature. The latest blow came three weeks ago when the legislature cut its budget, eliminating an expected $1.9 million. In 1989, the legislature threatened to withhold support because the orchestra had only one black musician.
NEWS
December 15, 2003 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Orchestra 2001 made its first appearance Saturday at Carnegie Hall with little resemblance to the sort of ensemble its name implies, having fashioned itself to accommodate the singular sound world of Philadelphia composer George Crumb. That means Orchestra 2001 resembled, on this particular day, little else in Western music. Performers could barely squeeze through the doors on the Weill Recital Hall stage, so tightly packed were the 50 percussion instruments needed for Crumb's Unto the Hills, a cycle of Appalachian folk songs for voice, piano and four extremely busy percussionists.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1996 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time since 1965, the Philadelphia Orchestra concerts in Carnegie Hall will be presented by the hall itself. Previously, Carnegie presented the orchestra in only one concert each season, and the orchestra assumed all promotional and financial responsibility for its other concerts in the hall. The Philadelphia Orchestra will play seven concerts at Carnegie Hall during the 1996-97 season, officials at the hall announced yesterday. In addition, Carnegie Hall will present orchestra music director Wolfgang Sawallisch and baritone Thomas Hampson in a Feb. 23, 1997, recital.
LIVING
January 11, 2000 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Wolfgang Sawallisch, Roberto Abbado, David Robertson and Vladimir Ashkenazy will lead the Philadelphia Orchestra in seven Carnegie Hall concerts next season. Carnegie Hall's 2000-01 season of 140-plus events, announced yesterday, will include a season-long focus on Stravinsky; world premieres of works by Alexander Goehr, Peter Lieberson, Tania Leon and P.Q. Phan; U.S. premieres of works by Mauricio Kagel, Luciano Berio, Hans Werner Henze, Augusta Read Thomas and Lorin Maazel; three Bach recitals by pianist Andras Schiff; three concerts by soprano Jessye Norman and James Levine; and a four-program series created by pianist Peter Serkin with composer-conductor Oliver Knussen and the London Sinfonietta.
NEWS
September 11, 2003 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's not every day that another Carnegie Hall comes along. But yesterday at noon, in a test-drive for critics and music-industry executives, Carnegie added a third performance space to its storied site on 57th Street, offering the sounds of solo-piano Debussy, a short new work for soprano Ren?e Fleming by John Corigliano, a jazz quintet, and a smattering of world music. Judy and Arthur Zankel Hall, with up to 650 seats, was carved from the space below the famous Isaac Stern Auditorium.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
NEW YORK - Speculation over Yannick Nézet-Séguin's appointment to the Metropolitan Opera continues to rage - but you wouldn't suspect that amid the nonchalant Carnegie Hall crowd at the Philadelphia Orchestra's final concert of its season here. Usually the orchestra plays Carnegie Hall at the end of a subscription series. Wednesday's concert, though, preceded the same program Thursday through Saturday at the Kimmel Center. Though not at its most polished, the orchestra delivered a program of Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 1 with Lang Lang and the Mahler Symphony No. 10 that was greeted with considerable receptivity, though at nearly 21/2 hours, the concert had listeners leaving to catch their trains the minute the symphony ended.
NEWS
May 8, 2016
Yuja, live from New York. Pianist Yuja Wang has worked up a solo recital she's playing in the United States, Paris, and Germany, and at the Concertgebouw, but listeners all over can hear the program when she brings it to Carnegie Hall at 8 p.m. Saturday. Repertoire includes Brahms' Ballades, Op. 10, Nos. 1 and 2; Schumann's Kreisleriana, Op. 16; and the Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 29 in B-flat Major, Op. 106, "Hammerklavier. " The Curtis Institute of Music graduate is something of a visual phenomenon for many, and for those fans, the Carnegie Hall recital will be streamed live online, and available for viewing on free replay for 90 days, at medici.tv.
NEWS
December 3, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Often in the vanguard of evolving developments in recording, the Philadelphia Orchestra was part of the Google Cultural Institute's performing-arts rollout Tuesday, which involved a 60-institution partnership representing more than 20 countries and also including one of Philadelphia's Renaissance bands, Piffaro. The orchestra is represented by a short 360-degree video of Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting Grieg's "In the Hall of the Mountain King" from Peer Gynt before a live audience at Carnegie Hall.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Another triumph for Yannick Nézet-Séguin: The news leaked out Wednesday that the Philadelphia Orchestra music director is Musical America's Artist of the Year. The honor puts him on the cover of Musical America Worldwide: The International Directory of the Performing Arts, a phone-book-size $125 annual publication considered the bible of the classical music industry, a complete Who's Who and How to Find Them. "I am deeply and sincerely honored to accept this prestigious honor," said Nézet-Séguin in a statement released by the Philadelphia Orchestra.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In an extension of its already numerous outreach activities, the Philadelphia Orchestra announced a new partnership Thursday with Carnegie Hall's second youth orchestra, to be formed in 2016. Having already formed the National Youth Orchestra of the USA (NYO-USA) in 2013 for musicians ages 16 to 19, Carnegie Hall is now founding the 80-piece NYO2 for students 14 to 17 who "have been traditionally underserved by local music programs," according to a statement it released. As many as "several dozen" Philadelphia musicians will act as both as coaches and side-by-side players, said Philadelphia Orchestra president and CEO Allison Vulgamore.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'Were we even at the same concert?" So goes the standard complaint critics hear from readers who had a completely different experience from what they read about in the newspaper. And the answer is, often, we weren't. In our cinema-dominated world of standardized experiences, it's hard to believe the Philadelphia Orchestra's repeated subscription concerts vary so significantly that a listener might come away from the same program with radically different impressions. But the performances do indeed change.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Philadelphia Orchestra music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin will be replaced in this week's Kimmel Center and Carnegie Hall concerts by Michael Tilson Thomas. An orchestra spokeswoman said Nézet-Séguin was suffering from sinus problems and had been told by his doctor not to travel. This is the second Carnegie Hall date he will have missed this season; the first was the hall's season-opening gala last month, cancelled due to a stagehands' strike. In another switch, guest pianist Helene Grimaud has requested a change of program from Brahms' Piano Concerto No. 2 to his Piano Concerto No. 1 . Nézet-Séguin has been in his native Montreal, playing concerts that have included chamber music with his partner, violist Pierre Tourville, two Wednesday concerts (9 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.)
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The New Yorkers struck, but the Philadelphians stuck. Stuck to their hometown fans, that is. Unable to perform at Wednesday night's Carnegie Hall season-opening gala after stagehands went on strike, the Philadelphia Orchestra responded with a bold Plan B, putting on an abbreviated concert back home in Verizon Hall. The doors of the Kimmel Center were thrown open Wednesday at 6 p.m. and, to a crowd of about 2,500, the orchestra played a no-intermission 90 minutes of Tchaikovsky, Mozart, and Ravel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - Another "phoenix moment" for the Philadelphia Orchestra? That's how Carnegie Hall's director of artistic planning, Jeremy Geffen, describes the orchestra's arrival Wednesday to open the 2013-14 season in New York City's august concert venue, whose audiences and management cheered the orchestra through its bankruptcy. Slots don't come any more prestigious than opening night. The concert promises guaranteed star power with violinist Joshua Bell and music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin, now in his second season with the Philadelphians.
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