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Carolina Herrera

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LIVING
November 2, 1994 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Remember gabardine pantsuits from the 1970s? Or those shiny polyester disco dresses from the Saturday Night Fever era? How about tight satin duds made for those who liked to boogie? Do you still have some of those old threads in storage? Well, get ready to dust them off and shake out the mothballs. It's retro time again in the fashion world. Believe it or not, many U.S. designers are reworking styles from the disco days. If you'll recall, it was just last year that designers revisited flower power and other themes from the hippie/free-love segment of the late '60s.
NEWS
April 16, 2002 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber FOR THE INQUIRER
If there's anything in fashion she hates, designer Carolina Herrera says, it's excess. In clothing, in jewelry, in makeup. In anything, really. In her latest collection, for fall 2002, she uses a touch of luxe here, a dash of glam there, but never goes over the line. She was inspired by the provocative photographs of Helmut Newton, hence the seamed stockings and very fitted leather coatdresses. Herrera has reinvented the tuxedo, and declares the suit is back. "I love suits," she said in presenting the collection here Thursday, in a benefit for Children's Hospital of Philadelphia at the Park Hyatt that was sponsored by Saks Fifth Avenue.
LIVING
June 16, 1994 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Carolina Herrera's eyes misted, then glistened with tears when she began to speak of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. "She was so together. Everything she did she did with so much class and I don't think we'll see another woman like her," said the designer, who began creating clothes for Onassis in 1982. From that time until Onassis's death last month, Herrera never spoke publicly of her beloved friend and loyal client. "I respected her privacy. The friendship was very important to me, more important than going around and saying that I dressed her. " Only now, with Onassis buried beside her assassinated first husband, President John F. Kennedy, in Arlington National Cemetery did Herrera speak of her. The remembrance came at the tail end of a 30-minute conversation with the Venezuela-born designer.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | New York Daily News / HARRY HAMBURG
All that glitters is the goal for many of the spring/summer collections shown here this week. Marc Jacobs, for Monday's Perry Ellis show, even knitted shiny threads into some sleeveless sweater dresses. Carolina Herrera showed a simpler, more streamlined look.
NEWS
January 11, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey and Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Debutantes and celebrities went to Suky Rosan to be outfitted for their weddings, and for good reason: "I believe you make big days out of the big days," the owner of one of the Main Line's most exclusive bridal salons once said. "That's what separates us from the animals. " Ms. Rosan, 85, died Thursday at her Haverford home. For more than 30 years, the former model and fashion commentator matched brides such as Allen Iverson's wife, Tawanna, and WCAU-TV (Channel 10) news anchor Renee Chenault-Fattah with the perfect gown.
NEWS
December 20, 1993 | by Joseph Steuer, New York Daily News
Made-to-order wedding dresses, like babies, are usually conceived months before they arrive. But the first time Carolina Herrera heard she would create Marla Maples' wedding dress was Dec. 11. Herrera, the women's clothing designer whose client list flows with some of the world's bluest blood - from Princess Margaret to Jacqueline Onassis - knew she would have to work swiftly. "I often start on a wedding dress six months early," she said during an interview at her office this week.
NEWS
March 25, 2003 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Glitterless pantsuits, flat shoes, and plain-Jane business attire did not descend on Sunday night's Oscarfest, despite the country's somber mood. Instead, our darlings of the big screen came well-dressed and ready to celebrate in slim-fitting black gowns and off-the-shoulder dresses in warm pastels. The colorful looks could mean one of two things: 1. That even though the war with Iraq began just days before, nothing - not even the lack of the traditional red-carpet arrivals - could stop movie stars from wowing their fans with fabulous taste.
NEWS
September 12, 2007 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
While the Marc Jacobs show was definitely the most surprising, Spring 2008 Fashion Week is wrapping up with gusto. Things may have started off slowly, but the later designers have added a flamboyant note by putting unexpected touches on conservative familiar looks. Dresses - especially long ones - will be around for a few more seasons, with the addition of floppy hats and long gloves. Colors range from muted to electric, with a particular emphasis on navy blue. In a word, Carolina Herrera's show was spectacular.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1986 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cher, swathed in Indian printed silk, silver fringe dangling from her ears and a tiny flower tattoo on her bare ankle, started the applause at the Bob Mackie show when a sexy, navel-baring, beaded gown slithered down the runway. "Yeah, that's me," said the actress, who, along with Diana Ross, Carol Burnett and just about all of Hollywood, is a member of the Los Angeles designer's fan club. On the other hand, the New York social set - C.Z. Guest, Nan Kempner, Estee Lauder - is crazy about Carolina Herrera, the South American socialite-turned- designer who provides them with luncheon suits and elegant evening wear.
NEWS
November 10, 2004 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
A few minutes before Carolina Herrera was to showcase her Resort 2005 line, she pointed out a couple of her favorite pieces: "See that pink and white print? We developed that one. And those stripes. See how they are going? Like I told you, they don't have to be straight up and down. And those polka dots! I just love polka dots. " With that, Herrera was whisked away to pose for another photograph. The demure designer was in Newtown Square Monday for a poolside luncheon hosted by the Wellness Community in partnership with Saks Fifth Avenue.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 14, 2010 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Stylist Lori Goldstein is a big deal in the fashion world. In her 20 years in the biz, she's worked with Vogue photographers Steven Meisel and Annie Leibovitz, and produced major fashion spreads at Elle and Glamour magazines. And she's been a consultant for runway giants Donatella Versace, Calvin Klein, and Narciso Rodriguez. But unlike them, she hadn't become a household name. That is, until QVC's Fashion Week telecast last February, when she entered our living rooms with her first women's wear collection - LOGO Instant Chic by Lori Goldstein.
NEWS
February 17, 2009 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Some of fashion's heavy hitters - Kimora Lee Simmons, Betsey Johnson, and Marc Jacobs - have scaled back their presentations this week out of respect for the faltering economy. Still, the more than 100 American designers presenting their fall collections in and around the Bryant Park tents are practicing the law of attraction, believing that if they put their all into their work and stay optimistic, the consumer will again buy designer clothing. They just have to. "I haven't changed anything," said Ralph Rucci, the Philadelphia-bred designer who will close New York Fashion Week Friday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Imagine having Vogue editor-at-large Andr? Leon Talley compliment your style. Then imagine you're an aspiring designer at the University of the Arts. Sort of like sitting on top of the world, eh? Well, that's how five University of the Arts students felt Thursday at the Four Seasons in Center City when Talley, the gregarious friend of Oprah, Oscar and Obama, picked them out of a standing-room-only crowd to praise their personal style. "Fashion may not be the most important thing in life, but it definitely helps you get through it," he said.
LIVING
September 10, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Melanie Brandon is so close to fashion notoriety, she can just about pull it over her head. The title just doesn't fit her perfectly - yet. The Mount Airy native previewed her uniquely Philadelphia spring 2009 collection Monday afternoon on the rooftop of the Scandinavia House on Park Avenue. In addition to the silk chiffons and taffetas and English cottons from which Brandon fashions her airy dresses, her work also features chunky jewelry made from guns confiscated by the Philadelphia Sheriff's Department.
NEWS
May 29, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Carrie, Miranda, Charlotte and Samantha's relationship choices on the HBO series Sex and the City were often painful to watch, but their fashion choices sparked major trends. (Can we say Manolo Blahnik, the pink cell phone, the Carrie necklace, Jimmy Choos?) As designers vied for snippets of screen time, fashion's role in the show grew . . . and grew . . . and grew. In SATC's long-awaited big-screen debut, fashion is officially the film's fifth main character. We see our favorite fashionistas search for, preen in, ogle at and simply walk around in a bevy of absolutely dreamlike, hot-off-the-runway ensembles.
NEWS
March 4, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Under dim lights and to the beat of electronic music, South Philadelphia-born designer Ralph Rucci floated an exquisite black duchess satin gown down the circular runway in Le Couvent des Cordeliers. The sleeveless, slightly high-necked bodice glittered. The full skirt was covered with ostrich feathers placed with such exactness, the bottom of the garment looked like one continuous piece of textured velvet. The dress captured the regality that a finale piece should. "My collection is about how to look and live in a moment when luxury is an excess or trend," Rucci said moments after the last model delicately walked the runway.
NEWS
September 12, 2007 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
While the Marc Jacobs show was definitely the most surprising, Spring 2008 Fashion Week is wrapping up with gusto. Things may have started off slowly, but the later designers have added a flamboyant note by putting unexpected touches on conservative familiar looks. Dresses - especially long ones - will be around for a few more seasons, with the addition of floppy hats and long gloves. Colors range from muted to electric, with a particular emphasis on navy blue. In a word, Carolina Herrera's show was spectacular.
NEWS
June 24, 2007 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
For her ready-to-wear collection at Moore College of Art and Design's annual student fashion show, Andrea Felker dyed white silk pink, digitally imprinting it with chocolate-brown circles, to use for her A-line dresses, bubble skirts, and empire-waist blouses. In addition, she strung beads for jewelry and knitted merino wool in pink and brown swirls to trim both a handbag and a dress. "I wanted to create everything in this collection to make it a little more special," Felker said.
NEWS
June 24, 2007 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
For her ready-to-wear collection at Moore College of Art and Design's annual student fashion show, Andrea Felker dyed white silk pink, digitally imprinting it with chocolate-brown circles, to use for her A-line dresses, bubble skirts, and empire-waist blouses. In addition, she strung beads for jewelry and knitted merino wool in pink and brown swirls to trim both a handbag and a dress. "I wanted to create everything in this collection to make it a little more special," Felker said.
NEWS
February 26, 2007 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Actresses skipped necklaces and posed on the Kodak Theatre's red carpet on their way into the 79th annual Oscar ceremony last night in blush-colored and jewel-toned Grecian-styled and strapless gowns. This is not surprising, as these looks dominated this year's red-carpet season. But last night's bare necks drew even more attention to designer detail, which was a combination of sexy, off-the-shoulder tops, basket-weave bodices, and full skirts fashioned from layers of ruffles and tulle.
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