CollectionsCarpal Tunnel Syndrome
IN THE NEWS

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 3, 2000 | By Peter Nolan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Carpal tunnel syndrome is not limited to those who use keyboards. The malady, which causes severe pain in overused wrists, is also a common condition for shot-putters, as Upper Darby's Katie Link knows all too well. Link, a sophomore, is a hard worker whose practice routine, until several weeks ago, involved throwing the shot daily. The hard work had paid off. In her two years, Link threw for progressively greater distances in every meet, breaking the school record and then breaking her record in each consecutive meet.
NEWS
March 8, 1999 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're sharing information on the recent hand transplants that made news around the world. They're studying the latest treatments on the now-ubiquitous carpal tunnel syndrome. And they're revisiting more commonplace problems - ligament tears and fractures. Nearly 1,000 hand specialists, surgeons and therapists from across the nation and 22 countries gathered for a major medical symposium over the weekend at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel in Center City. The four-day conference - ending tomorrow - is the largest annual meeting of its kind in the nation and follows striking medical strides, including the successful hand transplant of Matthew Scott of Absecon, N.J., in January and an earlier hand transplant in France.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The battle between the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Campbell Soup Co.'s Pepperidge Farm unit has been called a "landmark" in the history of carpal tunnel syndrome. In this instance, the carpal tunnel syndrome arose not from computers, which tend to get the most publicity, but from cookies. In 1988, a worker in a Pepperidge Farm plant in Downingtown that produced cookies and crackers complained to OSHA that a large number of employees suffered from hand and wrist injuries as a result of the motions required in picking up and packing cookies.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Four women who underwent wrist surgery are suing the Willow Grove surgeon who operated on them, contending the technique he used to relieve their carpal tunnel syndrome made it worse. The women are seeking $20,000 each in damages from David M. Pagnanelli, a surgeon who practices at three hospitals - Abington Memorial, North Penn and Grand View. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a debilitating condition of the hands and wrists usually caused by repetitive stress on the ligaments and muscles.
SPORTS
August 12, 1988 | By JOE GREENDAY, Special to the Daily News
Welcome to General Hospital, better known as the 70th PGA Championship. Back spasms, carpal tunnel syndrome and pneumonia were as common as pars, birdies and bogeys in the golfers' vernacular after the opening round at Oak Tree Golf Club yesterday. Playing hurt is a standard practice among NFL players, but PGA Tour pros are not exactly immune. Paul Azinger, 1987 PGA Player of the Year, made a remarkable recovery from a back ailment to become a threat in this overheated classic.
SPORTS
October 31, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Harold Reynolds plans to sue ESPN over his departure from the network as a baseball analyst last summer. Published reports have said he was fired for sexual harassment. Reynolds played 12 major league seasons and joined ESPN in 1996. "After numerous conversations and multiple mediation discussions with ESPN executives, it is clear that ESPN had no intention of solving this problem amicably," he said in a statement. ESPN spokesman Josh Krulewitz said yesterday that the network had been made aware that Reynolds either has filed a lawsuit or plans to in coming days.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1999 | By Caille Millner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If your workday consists of sitting at a computer terminal, you might start to feel numbness and tingling in your wrists and hands. Concerned about repetitive stress injuries (RSI) such as carpal tunnel syndrome, you might purchase an "ergonomically correct" keyboard or mouse. But like 200,000 Americans a year, you might need surgery for RSI anyway. A study published in the July 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association claims that one in five people who experience pain and numbness in their arms may have carpal tunnel syndrome or a related stress injury.
NEWS
April 8, 1995 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's still a certain snob factor among American orchestras when it comes to hiring conductors. Major groups tend to shy away from little-known names, and they remain inexplicably timid about putting Americans atop the podium. And so it was surprising to see the Philadelphia Orchestra bring in a guest conductor this weekend who responds to both descriptions. Carl St. Clair, a Texas native and music director of the Pacific Symphony Orchestra, in Santa Ana, Calif., made an impression yesterday afternoon as a solid and often imaginative leader.
NEWS
March 10, 2001 | By David Gartner
The first major piece of legislation that President Bush to sign will be a bill repealing health and safety protections for millions of workers. Using a little-known device that limits public debate, the Senate this week stayed into the night to overturn regulations for the nation's biggest and costliest job-safety problem. The House then followed suit. Every year, nearly 1 million Americans report taking time away from work because of musculoskeletal disorders such as lower back injuries or carpal tunnel syndrome.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Way back in 1982, when Pac-Man Fever hit the airwaves and teenage boys knew little of carpal tunnel syndrome, the challenging video game Asteroids ruled the arcades - and Scott Safran was king. The 15-year-old from Cherry Hill spent hours smashing boulders and racking up spaceships on a console at the local 7-Eleven store. That November, he set his sights on the world Asteroids record, choosing the All-American Billiard Arcade in Bucks County as his venue. His mother lent him a quarter, Safran dropped it in the slot, and an endurance match between man and machine began.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2011 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
It's time to take a long, hard look at your TV viewing habits. Why? Because there are some new and disturbing findings about what prolonged TV-watching can do to your health and to the environment. We'll get to that data in a minute. First, are you a TV addict? Before you answer, remember that denial is the primary attribute of addiction. I can't tell you how many people loftily say to me, "I only watch the History Channel" or "I only watch PBS. " Yet, I've found over and over again that if you hide in the bushes outside these people's houses and peek in their windows at night, you'll see them absorbed in Wipeout or Operation Repo or Swamp Wars . Here are 10 simple questions to determine if you're a TV addict.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2010 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
British playwright Laura Wade works the manual metaphor hard in Other Hands, currently receiving its U.S. premiere courtesy of Luna Theater. During the play, four of the cast's eight hands are crippled by carpal tunnel syndrome or repetitive stress injury, or perhaps just sympathy pains - no one can pinpoint the source. But while ice, braces, and injections dull the physical aches, the real handicap at the core of computer fix-it guy Steve's (Christopher Bohan) and corporate downsizer Hayley's (Amanda Grove)
SPORTS
May 31, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Joba Chamberlain received his long-awaited promotion, and the rookie righthander will make his first start for the Yankees at home in the Bronx. Manager Joe Girardi said the 22-year-old will take the mound at Yankee Stadium on Tuesday night against Toronto and be limited to 65 or 70 pitches. After deliberating about the decision during New York's off day Thursday and consulting with general manager Brian Cashman, Girardi said yesterday he decided to keep Andy Pettitte on his regular throwing schedule and use the lefthander for Monday's series finale against the Twins.
SPORTS
October 31, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Harold Reynolds plans to sue ESPN over his departure from the network as a baseball analyst last summer. Published reports have said he was fired for sexual harassment. Reynolds played 12 major league seasons and joined ESPN in 1996. "After numerous conversations and multiple mediation discussions with ESPN executives, it is clear that ESPN had no intention of solving this problem amicably," he said in a statement. ESPN spokesman Josh Krulewitz said yesterday that the network had been made aware that Reynolds either has filed a lawsuit or plans to in coming days.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Way back in 1982, when Pac-Man Fever hit the airwaves and teenage boys knew little of carpal tunnel syndrome, the challenging video game Asteroids ruled the arcades - and Scott Safran was king. The 15-year-old from Cherry Hill spent hours smashing boulders and racking up spaceships on a console at the local 7-Eleven store. That November, he set his sights on the world Asteroids record, choosing the All-American Billiard Arcade in Bucks County as his venue. His mother lent him a quarter, Safran dropped it in the slot, and an endurance match between man and machine began.
NEWS
March 10, 2001 | By David Gartner
The first major piece of legislation that President Bush to sign will be a bill repealing health and safety protections for millions of workers. Using a little-known device that limits public debate, the Senate this week stayed into the night to overturn regulations for the nation's biggest and costliest job-safety problem. The House then followed suit. Every year, nearly 1 million Americans report taking time away from work because of musculoskeletal disorders such as lower back injuries or carpal tunnel syndrome.
SPORTS
February 3, 2000 | By Peter Nolan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Carpal tunnel syndrome is not limited to those who use keyboards. The malady, which causes severe pain in overused wrists, is also a common condition for shot-putters, as Upper Darby's Katie Link knows all too well. Link, a sophomore, is a hard worker whose practice routine, until several weeks ago, involved throwing the shot daily. The hard work had paid off. In her two years, Link threw for progressively greater distances in every meet, breaking the school record and then breaking her record in each consecutive meet.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1999 | By Caille Millner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If your workday consists of sitting at a computer terminal, you might start to feel numbness and tingling in your wrists and hands. Concerned about repetitive stress injuries (RSI) such as carpal tunnel syndrome, you might purchase an "ergonomically correct" keyboard or mouse. But like 200,000 Americans a year, you might need surgery for RSI anyway. A study published in the July 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association claims that one in five people who experience pain and numbness in their arms may have carpal tunnel syndrome or a related stress injury.
NEWS
March 8, 1999 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're sharing information on the recent hand transplants that made news around the world. They're studying the latest treatments on the now-ubiquitous carpal tunnel syndrome. And they're revisiting more commonplace problems - ligament tears and fractures. Nearly 1,000 hand specialists, surgeons and therapists from across the nation and 22 countries gathered for a major medical symposium over the weekend at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel in Center City. The four-day conference - ending tomorrow - is the largest annual meeting of its kind in the nation and follows striking medical strides, including the successful hand transplant of Matthew Scott of Absecon, N.J., in January and an earlier hand transplant in France.
SPORTS
August 7, 1995 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It might soon be the only Phillies streak worth monitoring. Gregg Jefferies has not slammed a helmet in frustration for six games now, a run of restraint that, not coincidentally, began the day of Jim Fregosi's Atlanta Address. "It's just something I'm putting an honest effort into doing," Jefferies said before yesterday's doubleheader. "I'm trying not to let everything get so built up inside me. It's been tough. The losing, the injuries, the frustrations of the team. " The helmet-hurling habit, which had annoyed some teammates and coaches, reached its apex a week ago Sunday in Chicago.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|