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Carriage House

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REAL_ESTATE
August 19, 2013 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
For Ron and Virginia DiLeo, adding a 400-square-foot screened side porch last year was the final step in the 11-year-old transformation of their Pipersville arts-and-crafts carriage house into their ideal home. The porch isn't just a porch - it is now the focus of the DiLeos' Upper Bucks County retreat. No ordinary appendage, it features stylish couches backed in black metal, chairs, a full bar, and a table that can accommodate up to 16 people. The screens allow the couple and their guests to face either the countryside or a road leading to the Delaware River.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber, For The Inquirer
For a long-ago architecture class at the Rhode Island School of Design, Jeff Carpenter designed a plan to convert an abandoned boathouse into a home. Though he decided to pursue painting, not architecture, the project always stuck with him. Carpenter drew on this experience two years ago when he and his then-partner, artist Sallie Ketcham, renovated an oversized carriage house in the Art Museum area into a nautically inspired home. Carpenter, a representational abstract painter whose work has appeared in museums like the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and the Museum of Contemporary Art/Denver, was living in Massachusetts in 2009.
NEWS
October 23, 1998 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The planned demolition of a Frank Furness carriage house was canceled yesterday - for now. Ted Goldsborough, president of the Lower Merion Historic District, received the news at 7:30 a.m. after two weeks in which he and other Lower Merion historic preservationists mounted a hasty campaign to save the dwelling. Believing that demolition would come this week, the group had planned to gather at the historic tract in protest yesterday. That was canceled, too - for now. "I can't be more pleased that [the owner]
TRAVEL
September 30, 2012 | By Clarke Canfield, Associated Press
SCARBOROUGH, Maine - The studio where painter Winslow Homer derived inspiration on Maine's craggy coast and produced some of his most notable seascapes isn't heated with wood or illuminated by oil lamps as it was in Homer's day. But in most other ways, the studio has now been restored to what it was like when Homer lived there, from 1883 until his death in 1910, following a multiyear, $2.8 million restoration by the Portland Museum of Art. ...
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Artist Daniel Anthonisen lives in a rustic carriage house in Point Pleasant, Bucks County, that basically consists of one room and a loft. For Anthonisen, 41, it's a perfect fit. His tiny carriage house sits next to a historic home that dates to 1794 on the expansive property of architect Alan Ritchie and his wife, Rosa, an interior designer. Ritchie is a partner in the New York architectural firm of Johnson-Ritchie, which has designed buildings including Trump International, the Chrysler Center, and locally, the Business Center at Drexel University.
NEWS
February 28, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
The owner of a large house on North Church Street will not be permitted to subdivide it, according to a recommendation by the West Chester Planning Commission. Robert Schunn, who owns a house at 411 N. Church St., next to the West Chester Public Library, asked the Planning Commission in January whether he could subdivide the carriage-house property from the main house, renovate the carriage house and sell both properties. Doing so would result in a nonconforming lot. The commission recommended last week that the application be denied because siting and construction of a driveway would be awkward, drainage from the driveway had nowhere to go, and plantings would be destroyed.
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jean K. Wolf, the chair of the Lower Merion Historic Architecture Review Board, got the first phone call. A historic building was scheduled for demolition, the director of the township building department told her two weeks ago. The permit would be issued promptly. That was enough to set the phones ringing in Lower Merion's toughest preservationist circles. Today at 11:15 a.m., many of those people will gather at the edge of the Gladwyne tract to let its new owner know how much this aging Frank Furness carriage house means to them.
REAL_ESTATE
September 27, 2009 | By Christine Bahls FOR THE INQUIRER
The year was 2007, and Daniel Traub was thinking of coming home. A photojournalist and fine-arts photographer, Traub, 37, had been away a long time, living in Beijing, Shanghai, and New York, but he thought it was time to return to his native Philadelphia. He hadn't seen much of his parents, architect David S. Traub and artist Lily Yeh, during his years away, and time, as we all know, waits for no one. But where to live? About the same time, his father was looking to move, too - out of his pricey office space in Center City.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | By Andrew Backover, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If you blink while driving through the heart of Gibbsboro, you almost certainly will miss the Gibbsboro Book Barn and Bindery, situated on a pastoral side street among modest homes. Or you might assume it is just a rickety old barn - which, in fact, it is. But inside the red, two-story structure on Washington Avenue is a collection of written treasures, some of which are far older than the barn itself, a former carriage house built in the 1880s. "I thought the barn would make a neat setting for a bookstore," said Book Barn owner Bill Walton, a 52-year-old Cherry Hill resident.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A tenant who was told he must move from a carriage house on the 500 block of County Line Road because of a zoning code violation said yesterday he was stunned and did not know where he would relocate. "I just heard about it (Wednesday)," said the tenant, a self-employed carpenter who gave only his first name, Joe. "I fixed up this place on my own for the past couple of years, and now I have to get out. Where am I going to go?" A quick tour of the hallway and his apartment showed the premises to be tidy and well-maintained, but tenants in the carriage house and adjacent mansion must move out because they are violating the township's single-family zoning ordinance, township officials have ordered.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2016
Broadway Musical Benefit Concert and Silent Auction Benefit concert for the Parkinson Council. Arden Theatre, 40 N. 2nd St.; 215-979-1445. theparkinsoncouncil.org/2016-musical-benefit-concert/. $40; $30 concert only. 3/28. 6 pm. Gloucester Abbey: Downton Style Fashions Exhibit features ladies' fashions from the period covered by the PBS series Downton Abbey. Gloucester County Historical Society Museum, 58 N. Broad St., Woodbury; 856-848-8531. Included in admission. 3/25. Rustic Farm Primitives Open House Sale & Show Everything that's old, odd, vintage, and unusual.
NEWS
August 29, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, Conshohocken has owned not one, but two valuable properties that sat mostly vacant, even as it rented office space for its staff. This month, the borough is rectifying that problem, with one of the buildings opening as a new borough hall and police station, and the other undergoing a market analysis to see if it might be turned into a bed and breakfast or event venue, or put to some other use. The progress was years in the making and...
REAL_ESTATE
August 3, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Realtor Joanne Davidow makes her way up the gypsum-caked stairs of one of the three townhouses being sculpted from historic carriage houses in the 2100 block of Sansom Street. The day is a warm and humid one, but the veteran agent's enthusiasm for the interior reworking of the 19th-century building is not affected by the weather. "Look at the detail in those windows," said Davidow, vice president, sales manager, of Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Fox & Roach, as she looked at something one is more likely to find in a church than in a carriage house that had been converted to office use. A work in progress, these rehabs are just three pieces of an 11-unit townhouse project on Van Pelt Street between Sansom and Walnut that is bringing prices from $950,000 to $2.3 million, she said.
NEWS
July 5, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Warrington is anything but a shrinking violet. She resists categories. Early on, back in the 1950s and 1960s, she studied dance with Sydney King and then became a member of Arthur Hall's Afro American Dance Ensemble. Always interested in writing and communication and politics, she moved into journalism, becoming news director for WDAS radio, and has been an off-and-on reporter and talk host on black radio in the city for nearly 40 years. From 1984 to 1992, she was press secretary for Mayor W. Wilson Goode.
REAL_ESTATE
April 21, 2014 | By Laura Hoover, For The Inquirer
Sometimes, when you live in a city, the best place to look is up. That's what Wes and Michala Costello decided when they discovered a fixer-upper in the neighborhood they wanted to live in. "It was the ugliest house ever," Michala, a real estate agent, says of the two-story carriage house tucked away on a side street in Chestnut Hill. But her husband, who had experience with mortgages and appraisals, had a vision. "He drew a quick sketch of the home with a third story, and asked me, 'What if it looked like this?
REAL_ESTATE
August 19, 2013 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
For Ron and Virginia DiLeo, adding a 400-square-foot screened side porch last year was the final step in the 11-year-old transformation of their Pipersville arts-and-crafts carriage house into their ideal home. The porch isn't just a porch - it is now the focus of the DiLeos' Upper Bucks County retreat. No ordinary appendage, it features stylish couches backed in black metal, chairs, a full bar, and a table that can accommodate up to 16 people. The screens allow the couple and their guests to face either the countryside or a road leading to the Delaware River.
REAL_ESTATE
May 12, 2013 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
For the last two years, family and friends have asked Anna Del Vecchio when she'll be moving from her trinity in Bella Vista. The answer is always the same. "I'm not going anywhere. Everything I need is here . . . my baker, the Ninth Street Market, and my bank is on the corner," says Del Vecchio, 75. She does readily concede, though, that she wanted nothing to do with the run-down shell that the property was when she first saw it. She was a young housewife with three preschool-age children in 1966, when her husband, Anthony Del Vecchio, said he had found a house for them.
TRAVEL
September 30, 2012 | By Clarke Canfield, Associated Press
SCARBOROUGH, Maine - The studio where painter Winslow Homer derived inspiration on Maine's craggy coast and produced some of his most notable seascapes isn't heated with wood or illuminated by oil lamps as it was in Homer's day. But in most other ways, the studio has now been restored to what it was like when Homer lived there, from 1883 until his death in 1910, following a multiyear, $2.8 million restoration by the Portland Museum of Art. ...
NEWS
August 7, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack W. Blumenfeld began his development career rather modestly while still a senior at Temple University. "He started to build the carriage house in back of 526 Spruce St.," his son Eric recalled. The Spruce Street property was a boarding house owned by his mother, Molly, where the family also lived. From the humble start of a carriage house in Society Hill in the late 1940s, Mr. Blumenfeld went on to establish a successful development firm that built projects in the Philadelphia region.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since 1972, when members of Philadelphia's long-prominent Chew family transferred ownership of Cliveden, the historic family residence, to the National Trust for Historic Preservation, it has functioned as a traditional house museum. Every day, visitors serenely toured the mansion, built by patriarch Benjamin Chew in 1767, admiring the elegant period furniture and listening to stories of the old-money gentry and the exciting days of the War of Independence. Every year, crowds massed to watch a vivid reenactment of the 1777 Battle of Germantown, George Washington's gallant but failed attack on British troops holed up at Cliveden.
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