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Carrie Brownstein

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NEWS
May 28, 1999 | By Sara Sherr, For the Daily News
Before I start the column, a few questions about the new Star Wars hoo-ha: On what planet do they speak Monotone? What is that weirdo Rasta kangaroo-lizard thing? Why does Natalie Portman have the presence of a lampshade? When did the Bozo the Clown guy from the Prodigy start his acting career? Why do I suddenly miss Princess Leia and Han Solo? This week, it's safe to say that all the alt kids who are not seeing "Star Wars" or going "downa' shore" to get their first sunburn of the long, hot summer will either be at Sleater-Kinney tonight at the Trocadero (7 p.m., 10th and Arch Streets, 215-922-LIVE, $8)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1997 | By Sara Sherr, FOR THE INQUIRER
From the moment Sleater-Kinney took the Pontiac Grille stage on Friday night, there was a palpable feeling of excitement in the overheated confines of the tiny, filled-to-capacity club. Even the sound check elicited reverence from the mostly female all-ages crowd. When Janet Weiss tested her drum kit, the front row danced along. And when exuberant frontwoman/guitarist Corin Tucker let out one of her impassioned wails, which fall in the middle ground between Belinda Carlisle and Courtney Love, members of the crowd screamed "yeah!"
NEWS
October 21, 2002 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Though Sleater-Kinney's roots are in the stridently punk riot grrl movement of the early '90s, the trio is now an amazing rock band, pure and not so simple. Saturday night at the sold-out Trocadero, S-K rollicked through 75 minutes of ecstatic blasts of inspiring rock and roll. The group's brilliance comes from its balance of three equals. Corin Tucker's commanding, quivering voice - part girl-group swagger, part punk-rock force - could overwhelm, and it went from a seductive whisper to a scream in the joyous "Words and Guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1999 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oh Lord, please don't let Rammstein be misunderstood. That's all that Christoph "Doom" Schneider asks. "Lots of people think we're trying to be dark or political or whatever," says the drummer for the German industrial-metal band, speaking through an interpreter on the phone from Berlin. "But we're just trying to take our music to extremes, like any good band would. " The misinterpretation of Rammstein - a standout at last year's Family Values tour and the headliner at the Electric Factory on Wednesday - took a serious turn when instant analysis rendered the band, along with Marilyn Manson and KMFDM, guilty by assocation in the killings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"I could be demure like girls who are soft for boys who are fearful of getting an earful," Corin Tucker sang in Sleater-Kinney's first song at the Trocadero on Saturday. Then, the singer with the five-alarm voice tossed that idea aside for a better one: "I gotta rock!" Sleater-Kinney - Tucker, fellow singer-guitarist Carrie Brownstein, and perpetually pounding drummer Janet Weiss - are adored by ardent female fans and boys not fearful of getting an earful (rock critics, especially)
NEWS
June 27, 2005 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Sleater-Kinney made its intentions clear from the top at the Trocadero on Friday. After the not-so-funny introduction from Saturday Night Live's Fred Armisen ("Let's welcome . . . Ashlee Simpson!"), Carrie Brownstein, Corin Tucker and Janet Weiss dove into "The Fox," the pounding, dissonant song that opens the bracing new album The Woods. Although the lyrics told an Aesop's fable-like story of a duck tempted by a good-looking fox, the heavy guitar chords and Tucker's screeches turned them into an ominous nightmare.
NEWS
October 30, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
You could tell that Corin Tucker had been away from the indie rock circuit for a while because the Sleater-Kinney and now solo singer expressed surprise Thursday night at how hot it was in the First Unitarian Church basement, where she was fronting her brand new Corin Tucker Band in their first Philadelphia show. A little warm in the church? That's a master-of-the-obvious observation, like saying that Sleater-Kinney - the Pacific Northwest riot-grrl trio of singer-guitarist Tucker, guitarist Carrie Brownstein, and drummer Janet Weiss - was one of the best, and most emphatically rocking American bands of the last 15 years.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Saturday Night Live , NBC's long-running comic showcase, sheds its skin every few years, along with cast members. In the most recent shedding, before the current season, SNL lost Fred Armisen, who - with "special musical guest Ian Rubbish" - comes to Underground Arts Thursday night for a solo show. With SNL since 2002, Armisen, 46, created oddball characters such as Venezuelan nightclub host Fericito, unfunny Native American comedian Billy Smith - and Rubbish, a politically perverse '70s/'80s punk guitarist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Desperately loved bands break up and get back together all the time. What's rare is when they come back at full strength, returning not only with skills intact and wisdom gained, but also with the sense of urgency that made them so desperately loved in the first place. Such is the case with Sleater-Kinney, the glorious three-piece band of singer-guitarists Corin Tucker and Carrie Brownstein and drummer Janet Weiss, who played a bristling-with-energy show at Union Transfer on Saturday night.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Saturday Night Live , NBC's long-running comic showcase, sheds its skin every few years, along with cast members. In the most recent shedding, before the current season, SNL lost Fred Armisen, who - with "special musical guest Ian Rubbish" - comes to Underground Arts Thursday night for a solo show. With SNL since 2002, Armisen, 46, created oddball characters such as Venezuelan nightclub host Fericito, unfunny Native American comedian Billy Smith - and Rubbish, a politically perverse '70s/'80s punk guitarist.
NEWS
October 30, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
You could tell that Corin Tucker had been away from the indie rock circuit for a while because the Sleater-Kinney and now solo singer expressed surprise Thursday night at how hot it was in the First Unitarian Church basement, where she was fronting her brand new Corin Tucker Band in their first Philadelphia show. A little warm in the church? That's a master-of-the-obvious observation, like saying that Sleater-Kinney - the Pacific Northwest riot-grrl trio of singer-guitarist Tucker, guitarist Carrie Brownstein, and drummer Janet Weiss - was one of the best, and most emphatically rocking American bands of the last 15 years.
NEWS
June 27, 2005 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Sleater-Kinney made its intentions clear from the top at the Trocadero on Friday. After the not-so-funny introduction from Saturday Night Live's Fred Armisen ("Let's welcome . . . Ashlee Simpson!"), Carrie Brownstein, Corin Tucker and Janet Weiss dove into "The Fox," the pounding, dissonant song that opens the bracing new album The Woods. Although the lyrics told an Aesop's fable-like story of a duck tempted by a good-looking fox, the heavy guitar chords and Tucker's screeches turned them into an ominous nightmare.
NEWS
October 21, 2002 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Though Sleater-Kinney's roots are in the stridently punk riot grrl movement of the early '90s, the trio is now an amazing rock band, pure and not so simple. Saturday night at the sold-out Trocadero, S-K rollicked through 75 minutes of ecstatic blasts of inspiring rock and roll. The group's brilliance comes from its balance of three equals. Corin Tucker's commanding, quivering voice - part girl-group swagger, part punk-rock force - could overwhelm, and it went from a seductive whisper to a scream in the joyous "Words and Guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2002 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Last year, Sleater-Kinney went on sabbatical. Janet Weiss worked with her second band, Quasi. Corin Tucker gave birth to her son, Marshall. And Carrie Brownstein taught high school English, did post-graduate work in socio-linguistics, and acted in the independent movie Group. In December, Brownstein moved south from Olympia, Wash., to Portland, Ore., where Tucker and Weiss have lived for years. The re-energized trio set about making One Beat, their sixth and most wide- ranging record, which is, in part, a politicized response to events since last year's terrorist attacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"I could be demure like girls who are soft for boys who are fearful of getting an earful," Corin Tucker sang in Sleater-Kinney's first song at the Trocadero on Saturday. Then, the singer with the five-alarm voice tossed that idea aside for a better one: "I gotta rock!" Sleater-Kinney - Tucker, fellow singer-guitarist Carrie Brownstein, and perpetually pounding drummer Janet Weiss - are adored by ardent female fans and boys not fearful of getting an earful (rock critics, especially)
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | By Sara Sherr, For the Daily News
There's too much to do this weekend! When it rains it pours, I guess. Here's the rundown: Tonight: Garage-turned-glam rockers The Makers are at the Khyber (9 o'clock, 56 S. 2nd St., 215-238-5888, $7). Because of their foray into a concept album and acoustic guitars with "Rock Star God," an angry Khyber-happy-hour backlasher wrote "The Fakers" in magic marker graffiti, and somehow brought the Delta 72's Gregg Foreman into all of this. My question is, what did any of these guys ever do to anyone?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1999 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oh Lord, please don't let Rammstein be misunderstood. That's all that Christoph "Doom" Schneider asks. "Lots of people think we're trying to be dark or political or whatever," says the drummer for the German industrial-metal band, speaking through an interpreter on the phone from Berlin. "But we're just trying to take our music to extremes, like any good band would. " The misinterpretation of Rammstein - a standout at last year's Family Values tour and the headliner at the Electric Factory on Wednesday - took a serious turn when instant analysis rendered the band, along with Marilyn Manson and KMFDM, guilty by assocation in the killings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo.
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